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TAT2, Task 2

 

 

 

 

 

TAT Task 2

Cara Kusnic

 

Student ID- 000148376

 

Mentor: Kelly Merlot

 

Assessment Code: JPT2

 

Date 02/24/2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Fiction Comprehension, features, and understanding

Instructional Problem Summary:

A significant amount of second grade students struggle with non-fiction reading comprehension. These students are unable to fully understand what they are reading as they are unable to answer questions about the text. A solid foundation in reading comprehension enables students to become better at higher order thinking and problem solving.

 

Needs Analysis Findings

When comparing both graphs, it has been determined that students performed better in the area of Literature comprehension. Students did not do as well in informational text. Twelve out of Twenty-three students did not meet proficiency. When going back over the test with each of those students, it was determined that the majority of them did not go back into the text to answer their questions. They relied on what they thought the answer was rather than locating evidence to support their answers. Those same students are students that struggle in the area of phonological awareness; reading was harder for these students are they were unable to read the words in the text and often guessed what the word or meaning of the word was. The data supports that there is a problem in reading comprehension with seven and eight year old second grade students.

 

Goal of Instruction

By the end of instruction, students will be able to obtain grade level reading comprehension using non-fiction text by achieving 7 out of 10 correct. Second grade students will be able to comprehend what they are reading through small groups and iReady instruction based on individual needs. Students will be assessed through iReady assessments and teacher assessments during one on one instruction.

 

Learner Analysis Findings

Students will need to know the alphabet. It will be important for them to identify and say each letter. They will also have to know the sound that each letter
makes and pronounce it.

 

Every learning group has unique characteristics about them. In the class of twenty-three second grade students, students come from urban areas. Students from this classroom have split homes meaning they are between mom and dad. In some cases the students only have mom or dad. The students in this classroom can be physically aggressive and emotionally imbalanced; however, with the help of PBIS, or Positive Behavior Incentive System, behaviors can be kept at bay. Students enjoy received positive praise for things that they do correctly. The students in this classroom celebrate the successes of everyone all day long. There is no such thing as small progress, everything is a big deal, and everything is important. Students in this classroom enjoy listening to all genres of music, which helps keep their learning environment soothing and productive. Many of the students in this classroom  do not have someone who is willing to help them read at home. They often do not get help with homework, so everything learned occurs in the classroom. Students tend to feel defeated if they make a mistake and want to shut down and no longer read. Luckily in this particular second grade class, when that occurs, clapping and words of encouragement are yelled (not whispered).

 

Planning the Design of the Instructional Unit

Task Analysis with Performance Objectives

 

Task 1 Introduction to Non-Fiction and Fiction Comprehension

 

1.1 Definition of Non-Fiction

1.2 Definition of Fiction

1.3 Similarities and Differences between non-fiction and fiction

Performance Objective

Using a self-selected reading book on their current level, students will compare and contrast a fiction text to a non-fiction text by creating and completing a T-Chart with at least 7 comparisons.

 

 

Task 2 Text Features

2.1 Definition of a text feature

2.2 Identify text features

 

Performance objective:

Using grade level non-fiction text, students will be able to identify three text features, scoring a minimum of 7/10 points on the assessment.

 

 

 

 

Task 3 Strategies to help read a non-fiction text

3.1 Highlight important information

3.2 Identify text features

3.3 Write questions that you have in the margin

Performance Objective:

Given a non-fiction text, students will demonstrate the use of three strategies to read a non-fiction text by highlighting information, identifying text features, and writing questions in the margin.

 

 

 

Learning Theories

 

Constructivism in lessons 1, 2, and 3 is represented by collaboration, student engagement, and class discussion.

 

Behaviorism in Lessons 1-3 is depicted through direct instruction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan #1 Title:  Introductory Lesson to Non-Fiction

 

Performance Objective: Using a self-selected reading book on their current level, students will compare and contrast a fiction text to a non-fiction text by creating and completing a T-Chart with at least 7 comparisons.

 

 

Resources or Materials Needed: T-Chart, non fiction books, fiction books, reading journals, pencil, teacher created assessment,

 

Time: 8:00-10:30 am

Step 1: Pre-Instructional Activities: 8:00-8:15

Students will collaborate with a partner to recall the different features of a fiction book.

Step 2: Content Presentation: 8:15-8:45

Students will be presented the information in a whole group setting via Flipsnack (Kusnic, 2019). https://www.flipsnack.com/ck523/fiction-vs-non-fiction.html

The teacher will show students the flyer created on Flipsnack. Students and teacher will chorally read the flyer. After students and teacher read the Flipsnack chorally, students will locate a fiction and non-fiction book on the shelf and will tell a partner which book is which and why. They will then work with a partner.

Step 3: Learner Participation: 8:45-9:45

When in the whole group setting, students will be expected to partake in the group discussion determining what makes a text non-fiction. During partner work, students will examine a fiction and non-fiction book. On a T-Chart, students will list the differences that they see in both text types. Students are expected to located at least 5 differences between what they see in each book. For instance they should be able to use the comparisons between characters, plot, setting, problem, solution, etc.

Step 4: Assessment: 9:45-10:15

Students will receive an oral assessment when the activity is over. They will use thumbs up and thumbs down to agree or disagree with what a non-fiction text is.

Step 5: Follow-Through Activities: 10:15-10:30

Independently, students will gather a non-fiction and fiction text. They will record their findings in their readers notebook.

 

 

 

Lesson Plan Summary: 

Students will come to the carpet as a whole group. The teacher will display the Flipsnack flyer that was created for this lesson. Teachers and students will read the flyer chorally. Students and teachers will create an anchor chart to depict the differences between fiction and non-fiction books. Next, the teacher would ask students what type of book he/she is holding and how they know. The teacher will pass around the book so they can turn the pages and look in the book. Then there will be a 60 second turn and talk to discuss what genre the book is and how they know. After 60 seconds, students will raise their hands and wait to be called on to provide the class with their determination after their own examination of the book. Students will determine that the text is fiction because of the pictures, the fact that animals can talk, the lack of bold print, the lack of captions. Students will then be given the definition of a non-fiction text. They will see that a non-fiction text holds the elements of a book that a fiction book does not, such as: cations, bold print, headings. The teacher will pass around several different non-fiction texts and students will gather into partners. With their partner, they will create a T-Chart for the elements that they see in a fiction book, and the elements that they see in a non-fiction book. Once they have approximately 30 minutes to do this, we will come back together as a whole group and collaborate. Students will share out their findings with the rest of the group and hold a discussion to talk about their points. Once this has ended, students will be given independent texts to look at and complete their own T-Charts and will locate at least 7 comparisons between fiction and non-fiction texts. Students will have approximately 30-40 minutes to complete this. While students are working, the teacher will call students back to the one on one table where the teacher will conduct an oral assessment and will take anecdotal notes. The best lesson theory for this lesson is Constructivism as students are engaged during every stage of the lesson. The activities in this lesson are student centered and student led. The class must lead each other in a group discussion about the answers that they come up with.

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan #2 Title:  Text Features

 

Performance Objective: Using grade level non-fiction text, students will be able to identify three text features, scoring a minimum of 7/10 points on the assessment.

 

 

Resources or Materials Needed: Reading journal, pencil, a list of text features, books with text features, iReady, teacher assessment, YouTube (Learners, 2017).

Time: 8:00-10:30

Step 1: Pre-Instructional Activities: 8:00-8:15

Review lesson 1, students will preview a non-fiction book silently

Step 2: Content Presentation: 8:15-8:45

Whole group via powerpoint presentation, partner work for collaboration, individual work to locate three text features, scoring a minimum of 7/10 points on the assessment. Students will view a whole group YouTube lesson (Learners, 2017) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciJks5acPmU

Students will watch this short presentation on YouTube of what text features are.

Step 3: Learner Participation:  8:45-9:45

Students will be introduced to text features in a whole group setting. Afterward, they will work with a partner and return to whole group to discuss. Finally, students will work independently to show that they understand what a text feature is and how it pertains to non-fiction.

 

Step 4: Assessment: 9:45-10:15

Students will identify three text features in their given non-fiction text.

Step 5: Follow-Through Activities: 10:15-10:30

Students will continue to identify text features in their independent reading for the week. Students will keep a log of the text features that help them the most during their independent reading.

 

Lesson Plan Summary:

In this lesson, students will begin in the whole group setting. Material will be delivered via the Smartboard. The teacher will have a presentation created that will show students what different text features are and why they are important. Students watch a Youtube video that describes what text-features are and will provide examples. Students will then sit with a partner and discuss why the text features are important and how they help them read non-fiction text. Students will work together on one paper to identify at least seven out of ten text features that are in their book. When their 30 minute time frame is up, students will come back together as a whole group to discuss their findings. Finally, students will be given a teacher made assessment to check for understanding while the rest of the class is on iReady and completing their text feature lesson and quiz. During the teacher assessment, using grade level non-fiction text, students will be able to identify three text features, scoring a minimum of 7/10 points on the assessment.

The best learning theory for this lesson is constructivism since there needs to be a lot of oral discussion and collaboration. Students are engaged during every stage of the lesson. The activities in this lesson are student centered and student led. The class must lead each other in a group discussion about the answers that they come up with.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Plan #3 Title:  Strategies

 

Performance Objective: Given a non-fiction text, students will demonstrate the use of three strategies to read a non-fiction text by highlighting information, identifying text features, and writing questions in the margin.

 

 

 

Resources or Materials Needed: Non-Fiction reading passage, highlighters, pencil

Time: 8:00-10:30

Step 1: Pre-Instructional Activities: 8:00-8:15

Discuss that last two days of instruction, define text feature, define what fiction is, define non-fiction what non-fiction is.

Step 2: Content Presentation: 8:15-8:45

There will be a powerpoint presentation to teach the beginning of the lesson. Collaboration will be needed for the partner work.  

Step 3: Learner Participation: 8:45-9:45

Students will partake in a whole group lesson, collaborate with a partner and show what they know independently. Given a non-fiction text, students will demonstrate the use of three strategies to read a non-fiction text by highlighting information, identifying text features, and writing questions in the margin.

Step 4: Assessment: 9:45-10:15

Students will partake in an online quiz from Quizizz. Click on the link to access the quiz: https://quizizz.com/admin/quiz/569fe768061a465e46c826c4/text-features

(Griffl, 2017).

Step 5: Follow-Through Activities: 10:15-10:30

Students will be able to successfully take tests and be engaged in group discussions as they have a strong foundation. They will also use the strategies that they have learned to help better understand their independent reading.

 

Lesson Plan Summary:

The lesson will begin in the whole group setting. The teacher will provide direct instruction to teach how to use the strategies. Students will discuss what elements of the non-fiction genre are used in their paragraph or passage. They will discuss with a partner what text features are as their review. As such, constructivism will take place as students are engaged and collaborating. Students will then be shown a paragraph on the Smartboard. They will read it independently first. Then, students will collaborate with a partner to determine the important sentences and will highlight the information that they find to be important. Another strategy that they will be taught to use is being able to identify text features to help them read. Finally, is it important to ask questions for clarification and students will do that by notating in the margin. Students will be assessed to make sure they are proficient using the strategies. Given a non-fiction text, students will demonstrate the use of three strategies to read a non-fiction text by highlighting information, identifying text features, and writing questions in the margin. As past of their assessment, students will partake in a Quizizz quiz. The quiz will take approximately 30 minutes. When students finish, gather new books from their book baskets that were put there this morning. Students will read the books, and will locate text-features in their book and write them in their journal along with the title.

 

 Assessment and Evaluation Method

Students will be assessed through performance objectives. While the students are being assessed the teacher will take anecdotal notes and will also use iReady. iReady assessments will be completed on the computer and will give immediate feedback to students on whether they are doing great and can move up, or it will tell them that they need additional support and help. On day three, students will use a test on Quizizz (Griffl, 2017).

 

 

Instructional Unit Revisions

Lessons were checked by Niwakkia Parker, 2nd grade teacher. Niwakkia liked that there was gradual release in the lesson plans. At first, I was going to give oral assessments and Mrs. Parker advised that I should omit them as did one other teacher.

 

 

 

 

References

Kusnic, C. (2019, February 24). Fiction vs. Non-Fiction. Retrieved February 24, 2019, from https://www.flipsnack.com/ck523/fiction-vs-non-fiction.html

 

Griffl. (2017). Text features. Retrieved February 24, 2019, from https://quizizz.com/admin/quiz/569fe768061a465e46c826c4

 

Learners, T. I. (2017, October 02). Text Features: Navigators. Retrieved February 24, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciJks5acPmU

 

 

 

Kusnic, C (2018, August 25). JPT2. Unpublished.

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