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Behavior Assessment Example

Functional Behavior Assessment, BIP  with Video Modeling: Latency Recording

A.  Child Information:

Bridgit, age 9, 4th grade

The observation took place in Bridgit’s home

 B.  Problem Behavior:

Bridgit is not taking responsibility for her school items after she gets home for the day at about   2:45 pm.  Sometimes her mother is home to remind her; at other times her mother is in class.  Even on the days when Bridgit’s mother is home, Bridgit tends to need repeated reminders to do what should be simple tasks that are well within the abilities of a typical nine-year-old to do by herself each day.  The antecedent seems to be leaving the school environment for the day and wanting to relax and do other fun activities at home.  When Bridgit does not fulfill her responsibilities, her possessions end up scattered all over the house, school “mail” such as field trip forms and notes home stays in her backpack and is not given to her parents, any food remaining in her lunchbox spoils and the ice block does not get frozen for the next day’s lunch, her uniform gets wrinkled or does not get washed, and she does not get a snack far enough ahead of time before dinner.  This also leads to frustration both for Bridgit and for her parents.  The targeted behaviors include:

  1. unpacking her backpack
  2. unpacking her lunchbox
  3. changing out of her uniform into play clothes
  4. placing her uniform at the end of her bed or in the laundry hamper (depending on the day)
  5. washing her hands
  6. getting a snack
  7. finishing this routine before 4 pm each day (75 minutes after arriving home)

C.  Interview:

From the interview with Bridgit’s mom, Chris:

Bridgit is a friendly, energetic girl with a bubbly personality.  She is affectionate and gets along with her siblings and parents, and she seems to enjoy school.  Her giggle is infectious and nearly always present.  Every evening, Bridgit’s parents are involved with making sure she completes her homework.  Outside of school, Bridgit enjoys playing with her friends and doing art projects at home.  She tends to start one project and move on to the next before cleaning up the first.  Although Bridgit knows she is supposed to pick up after herself, she is having difficulty following through.  Bridgit is the one who came up with the original idea of earning a trip to Build-A-Bear if she is able to master her after-school routine, which means she knows that she has a problem and is willing to learn. 

 

D.  Observation Data:

Dates of Observation: Wednesday, September 28; Wednesday, October 5; Friday, October 7,

2011

Place of observation:  Brigit’s home

 

Method of gathering data using Latency Recording: 

Because Bridgit’s mom, Chris, was part of this project, Chris could gather the data at home without Bridgit’s knowledge.  On the days of observation, Chris recorded what time Bridgit began each task, if at all.  The goal is for Bridgit to complete the entire routine by 4pm each day without being asked.  She arrives home at about 2:45pm, so she has plenty of time.  The first week, Bridgit will be allowed two reminders per day in order to earn a completion sticker for each task.  The second week, Brigit will be allowed one reminder per day.  The third week (and any subsequent weeks), Bridgit must complete the routine on her own in order to earn a sticker for each task.  When enough stickers have been earned, Bridgit will have earned a trip to the Build-A-Bear store to create her own stuffed animal.

 

Behavior Prior to Intervention:

Task

Day 1  Wed 9/28

Day 2  Wed 10/5

Day 3  Fri 10/7

Empty backpack

Didn’t complete

Didn’t complete

2:50

Empty lunch box

2:50

2:54

2:56

Play clothes on

3:33

Didn’t complete

After dinner

Uniform

Left on bedroom floor

Left on bathroom floor

Put in hamper

Wash hands

3:42

3:07

3:15

Eat snack

3:45

3:10

4:11

Done by 4 pm

No

No

Completed, but late

 

After the observation, Chris explained to Bridgit what Bridgit was supposed to do and by what time.  Chris then posted the chart of Bridgit’s tasks on the refrigerator so that Bridgit’s time of completion could be filled in by her mom.  The base start time was 2:45 pm (some days Bridgit arrived home earlier), and the required end time was 4pm, giving Bridgit 75 minutes to complete her routine.  For each task completed on time, Bridgit received a sticker on the chart in anticipation of earning enough stickers to be rewarded with a trip to the Build-A-Bear store.  During the first week of implementation, Bridgit was allowed two reminders to complete her tasks.  During the next week, she was allowed one reminder.  After that, she was required to complete the tasks independently.

Behavior with 2 reminders allowed:

 

Task

Wednesday 10/12

Friday  10/14

Empty backpack

 

2:40

2:53

Empty lunchbox

 

2:44

3:00

Play clothes on

 

3:00

3:12

Uniform

 

Left on bedroom floor

3:15

 

Wash hands

 

3:30

3:42

Eat snack

 

3:35

3:45

Done by 4 pm

 

No/uniform left on floor

Yes

 

 

Behavior with 1 reminder allowed:

 

Task         

Monday 10/17

Wednesday 10/19

Empty backpack

 

2:50

2:57

Empty lunchbox

 

2:54

3:00

Play clothes on

 

3:45

3:30

Uniform

 

3:45

Left on floor

Wash hands

 

4:12

3:35

Eat snack

 

4:15

3:45

Done by 4 pm

 

Completed but late

No/uniform left on floor

 

Behavior with zero reminders allowed:

 

Task         

Wednesday 10/26

Friday  10/28

Empty backpack

 

2:50

2:57

Empty lunchbox

 

2:54

3:00

Play clothes on

 

3:45

3:30

Uniform

 

Left on floor

Put in hamper

Wash hands

 

4:12

3:35

Eat snack

 

4:15

3:42

Done by 4 pm

 

No

Yes

 

 

Line graphs of how long it takes Bridgit to begin her tasks after arriving home in minutes (latency):  NOTE: THESE DID NOT COME THROUGH ON THE FORMATTING.  SEE ME FOR MORE INFORMATION!

 

Empty backpack (task not completed 9/28 and 10/5)

Empty lunchbox

Change into play clothes (task not completed 10/5; not completed until after dinner 10/7 [start time is approximate])

 

Put uniform away (task not completed 9/28, 10/5, 10/12, 10/19, 10/26;

completed after dinner 10/5 [start time is approximate])

 

Wash hands

Eat snack

 

Days all tasks were completed (recorded even if late)

F. Hypothesis/ Summary/ Proposed Action/Modification

Throughout the observation, whether before or after implementation of the behavior change plan, the data show that Bridgit was very good about emptying her lunchbox, changing out of her uniform and into play clothes, washing her hands, and getting an afternoon snack.  Once the intervention began, she began emptying her backpack almost as soon as she walked into the door each day.  However, she still needs to work on putting away her uniform and completing her routine in a timely fashion (within 75 minutes).  Nonetheless, Bridgit is showing signs of completing her routine independently: although the wait times for when Bridgit started each of her tasks each day were much lower when she received two reminders than when she received fewer, the times did not increase between the “one reminder” phase and the “zero reminder” phase.  In fact, Bridgit did complete her routine in a timely fashion on one of the observation days with zero reminders.  This is a huge improvement which seems to indicate that she is motivated to learn as well as to earn her trip to Build-A-Bear.  The intervention is working but should be continued.

            Although Bridgit is improving, it might be advisable to get her older siblings involved in the process so that she can be observed on a daily basis instead of two or three times per week (the days when her mom is home).  This would help Bridgit get into her routine more quickly by giving her more days when she is required to perform her tasks as well as more times for her to receive feedback and the rewards of the stickers.  It might also be beneficial for Chris to go over the expectations of the routine again with Bridgit, this time pointing out where the trouble spots are so that Bridgit can be more aware of her behavior and how she can improve.

Strengths and Weaknesses of the Data

Strengths:

Because Chris is Bridgit’s mom, the original observations were made without Bridgit’s knowledge.  Bridgit is also used to being at home every afternoon.  Therefore, her behavior was not altered due to concerns about this project.  Except for the task of washing her hands, it was very obvious whether or not Bridgit had completed a task and if she had completed it by 4pm: If her backpack, lunchbox, and uniform were not put away, she had not done her job.  If everything was still out at 4pm, she had not fulfilled her responsibilities by the prescribed time.  Bridgit’s time at home after school each day is much the same until well after 4pm, so she is not distracted by after-school activities such as piano lessons.  Because Brigit’s daily routine was not any different from what she is used to, the data is much more reliable. 

 

The data was also collected over a four-week period, which gives a more accurate recording of Bridgit’s behavior trends.  Additionally, the number of reminders were decreased each week to zero, which required Bridgit to complete the tasks on her own, indicating whether or not she is truly learning her new behavior instead of simply following someone else’s directions.

Weaknesses: 

The pre-intervention observation took place for only three afternoons.  Although the data recorded was consistent with what Bridgit’s mom, Chris, had noticed for several months, it would have been more credible if it had been officially recorded over two or three weeks.  Variances in health, sleep, occurrences at school, which parent/sibling was home, and time of day would have been accounted for and factored into the observed behavior.  The post-intervention data would have also been more credible if it had been collected every day. 

 

Behavior Intervention for Independently Completing the After-School Routine

Child:  Bridgit

Behavior Intervention Goal: Complete each task independently within the prescribed amount of time (by 4pm each day/75 minutes after arrival)

Individual Goal for the First Week:  Complete all seven after-school routine tasks by 4pm with no more than two reminders each day.

Individual Goal for the Second Week:  Complete all seven after-school routine tasks by 4pm with no more than one reminder each day.

Individual Goal for the Third and Subsequent Weeks:  Complete all seven after-school routine tasks without any reminders by 4pm each day.

Reward for Earning Goal:  Trip to Build-A-Bear to create her own stuffed animal

Video Modeling Shows:  Bridgit’s after-school routine with all tasks completed by 4pm

 

Bridgit’s Fantastic 4th Grade After-School To-do List

 

2 reminders allowed

 

Task

 

Mon______

 

Tues______

 

Wed______

 

Thurs______

 

Fri_______

Empty backpack

 

 

 

 

 

Empty lunch box

 

 

 

 

 

Play clothes on

 

 

 

 

 

Uniform

 

 

 

 

 

Wash Hands

 

 

 

 

 

Eat Snack

 

 

 

 

 

Done by 4pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 reminder allowed

 

Task

 

Mon______

 

Tues______

 

Wed______

 

Thurs______

 

Fri_______

Empty backpack

 

 

 

 

 

Empty lunch box

 

 

 

 

 

Play clothes on

 

 

 

 

 

Uniform

 

 

 

 

 

Wash Hands

 

 

 

 

 

Eat Snack

 

 

 

 

 

Done by 4pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 reminders allowed

 

Task

 

Mon______

 

Tues______

 

Wed______

 

Thurs______

 

Fri_______

Empty backpack

 

 

 

 

 

Empty lunch box

 

 

 

 

 

Play clothes on

 

 

 

 

 

Uniform

 

 

 

 

 

Wash Hands

 

 

 

 

 

Eat Snack

 

 

 

 

 

Done by 4pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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