AP English Language and Composition

April 16, 2018

AP Vocabulary List #10

  1.  Vernacular – the ordinary, everyday speech of a region
  2. Emotive language – language that expresses emotion
  3. Denotation – dictionary definition for a word
  4. Connotation – suggested meaning of a word or phrase
  5. Slanted Language – language that presents a particular viewpoint in a biased or prejudiced manner

 

  1. Cliché – a phrase or expression that has been used so often that it has lost its value

 

 

April 12, 2018

Homework

1.  Page 196r/198b, Questions on Language #4

2.  One page/front/skip

 

April 9, 2018

 

Homework

1.  Read the essay "On Compassion," page 193/195b.  Write one line-item AP Exam question for paragraphs 1-3.  Skip lines.  The correct answer should not be letter "a."

2.  Due Tuesday.

 

AP Vocabulary List #9

 

  1. Symbol – a thing, idea, or person that stands for something else
  2. Syntax – the order of words in a sentence; also the types and structures of sentences
  3. Thesis – the main idea of the essay; what the writer hopes to prove is true
  4. Tone – the speaker’s (author’s, narrator’s) attitude toward a person, place, idea, or thing
  5. Truism -  a statement that is obviously true and says nothing new or interesting
  6. Understatement – saying less than is necessary by the situation in order to emphasize reality

 

 

April 3, 2018

1. Last Factoid Friday Article/Image - Friday, April 6

2. Vocabulary Quiz - Friday, April 6

 

AP Vocabulary List #8

  1. Parody - A humorous imitation of an original text meant to ridicule; used as a technique in satire
  2. Pathos – elements in a text that appeal to the audience’s emotion
  3. Personification – to give human attributes or qualities to something that is nonliving or nonhuman
  4. Propaganda – information that is spread for the purpose of promoting some cause
  5. Rebuttal – to give an opposing point of view
  6. Rhetorical question – a figure of speech in the form of a question posed for its persuasive effect without the expectation of a reply
  7. Rhetorical strategy – various strategies and appeals that writers use to persuade
  8. Satire – a type of literature (or a rhetorical strategy) that exposes human foolishness through humor, exaggeration, and irony
  9. Staccato phrases -  phrases composed of a series of short, sharp sounds or words
  10. Suspense – as aspect of plot or narrative in which the author withholds information creating an urgent need to know in the reader.

 

 

March 19, 2018

Homework

1. Page 258r/271b, Suggestions for Writing #1

2.  One page/f-b/sk, hi-lite thesis

3.  Due Thursday

4. Period 5: DIDLS for "Size 6."  Due Wednesday

 

March 16, 2018

Homework

1. Page 258r/271b, Questions on Language, #1

2.  One page/front/skip

 

March 13, 2018

Homework

1.  Page 258r/271b, Questions on Writing Strategies - OTHER METHODS

2.  Mini Essay, 1 p/front-back/skip. Highlight thesis.

3.  Due Thursday

 

March 7, 2018

Homework

1.  Read "Size 6," p. 252r/265b

 

 

March 5, 2018

Homework

1.  Read and annotate 2017 Question 2 AP Eng. Lang Prompt

2.  Write vocabulary on back on photocopy

3.  Due: Tuesday

 

February 26, 2018

Homework

1.  Bedford, p. 249r/262b

2.  Questions on Writing Strategy, #3

3.  Mini Essay, 3 paragraphs. Highlight thesis. One page/front-back/skip lines.

4.  Due Wednesday

 

February 20, 2018

Homework

1.  Bedford, p. 249r/262b

2.  Questions on Meaning, #3

3.  Mini Essay. 3 paragraphs. Highlight thesis. One page/front-back/skip lines

4.  Due Friday

 

 

February 12, 2018

Homework

1.  Develop synthesis info on Arizona immigration into a 4-paragraph, typed essay.

2.  Due: Thursday, Feb. 15

Synthesis Prompt

 

Prompt:  Based on the two sources, immigration is a divisive issue in the state of Arizona.  Synthesize the two sources, identify three key issues associated with immigration and develop a position on what the U.S. (national) government should do to develop a humane solution.

 

 

February 5, 2018

Homework

1. Read "Grant and Lee," p. 245 red or 258 beige

2.  Questions on Writing Strategy, p. 249r/262b, # 3

3.  One page/front-back, skip

4.  Due Wed., Feb. 7

 

February 1, 2018

Homework

1. Page 223 red/229 beige

2.  Write each question and answer each question

3.  1 page/front/back/skip

4. Due Monday

 

January 29, 2018

AP Vocabulary Quiz #6

 

  1. Fallacy – an error in reasoning based on incorrect evidence
  2. Figurative language – language that uses figures of speech such as metaphors, similes, personification, etc.
  3. Footnote – an explanatory reference at the bottom of the page of a text
  4. Hyperbole – an exaggeration or overstatement (example: I’m so hungry, I can eat a cow.)
  5. Idealism – the act or practice of viewing things in an ideal form as they should be or as you would like them to be
  6. Idiom – two or more words which when used together, take on a new meaning (example: “what’s up?” for how are you; “kick the bucket” meaning to die)
  7. Implicit – meaning that is implied or suggested (opposite of explicit)

 

 

January 23, 2018

Homework

1.  Page 446 red/ 452 beige

2.  Suggestions for Wrriting #4

3.  1 page/front/skip

4.  Due Thursday, Jan. 25

 

January 16, 2018

Homework:

1. Page 446 red/452 beige

2.  Suggestions for Writing, #2

3.  Answer the first question: "Under what circumstances and conditions should children work?"

4.  Write one page, front/back, skip

5.  Due Thursday, Jan. 18

 

 

January 12, 2018

Homework:

1.  Page 445 red/ 451beige

2.  Questions on Meaning, #3

3.  What are Third World countries?  Google the term "third world."  Is the term still relevant?

4.  Write one page, front/back, skip.

5.  Due Tues, Jan. 16

 

January 10, 2018

 

Factoid Friday

 

-Every other Friday beginning January 19 students will bring an article on their topic from a different source with an index card attached containing the bibliographic information.  One of the articles must be a visual or graphic (cartoon, graph, photo, etc.).  The articles must no longer than 4-5 pages, represent different sides of your topic, and be taken from sources appropriate to college level research.  “Google Scholar” is a suggested search engine.

 

 

-Every 3 or 4 weeks each student will do an infomercial on their topics.  In the first they will take a stand to persuade their audience.  In the second they will argue the opposing side.  The third will be a qualified argument.  Each infomercial will contain a two-minute question and answer period from peers.

 

 

Bibliography

 

Newspaper or Magazine Article: Author’s Last Name/First Name, Title of the Article, Title of the Periodical, Date of Publication, Inclusive Page Numbers of the Article.

 

 

Hoover, Eric.  “New Attacks on Early Decision.” Chronicle of Higher Education.  11 Jan 2002: 45-46.

 

 

Internet Source: Author’s Last Name/First Name, Title of the Article, Title of the Database, Date of Electronic Publication, Date When you Accessed the Source, Network Address or URL

 

Mistral, Gabriela.  “Silueta de Sor Juana Ines.” Abside.  Feb 1998.  3 Oct. 2016 http://www.darmouth.edu/-sorjuana/Commentaries/Mistral.html

 

IMAGES

-GOOGLE IMAGES

-Type in your topic

-Click on image you want

-600 X 800 image size is usually maximum size for 8X11 paper

-Click on VISIT PAGE

-Get web address for bibliography for your image

-Click VIEW IMAGE

-RIGHT CLICK, PRINT

 

 

 

January 10, 2018

AP Vocabulary Quiz #5

 

  1.  Double entendre – a phrase or saying that has two meanings
  2.  Ellipsis – a mark or series of marks (…) used in writing to indicate an omission (missing) letters or words
  3. Empirical, empiricism – knowledge based on experience or observation; the view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge
  4. Episodic – appearing in episodes, a long string of short, individual scenes, stories, or sections
  5. Epigram – a short quotation or verse that precedes text that sets a tone or gives some other context for the text
  6. Ethos -  a speaker or writer’s credibility; his or her character, honesty, etc.
  7. Exemplar – an example, especially one that is a model to emulate or aim for
  8. Explicit – made obvious or clear.

 

 

 

Homework, Nov. 17, 2017

A dissertation is an essay a college student writes to get his PhD (doctorate) in a subject.

  1.  Read the dissertation written by Rebecca Carravilla Izquierdo of Spain titled: “Politics in Johnathan Swift’s Literature,” pages 1-18, and 33-35.
  2. Create a DIDLS
  3. Write a one-page in which you analyze the effectiveness of her rhetorical strategies.  Highlight the thesis.
  4. Be prepared for a quiz
  5. The dissertation is at https://uvadoc.uva.es/bitstream/10324/15813/1/TFG_F_2015_75.pdf
  6. Due Monday, Nov. 27

 

 

Homework- Nov. 9, 2017

  1.  Page 343r/347b: Suggestions for Writing, #1 – 1 page, front-back, skip lines>>DUE MONDAY, NOV. 13
  2. Print a Letter of Complaint.  Change it to a Satirical Letter adding the elements of satire (humor, hyperbole/exaggeration, sarcasm, irony) >>DUE WEDNESDAY, NOV.15.  Staple original letter and your satirical letter.

 

 

 

Nov. 6, 2017

Homework, Page 340r/344b

Journal Writing, 1 page, front, skip lines

 

Oct 30, 2017

Homework, Page 386

Question on Meaning, #1 (highlight thesis)

Question on Writing #1 (rest of page, front, skip lines)

 

AP Vocabulary Quiz #4

  1.  Assertion – the claim or point the author is making
  2. Bias -  a preference for or an inclination towards one side over another
  3. Candor – open and honest communication
  4. Circular reasoning – a type of faulty reasoning in which a writer attempts to support a statement by simply repeating the statement in stronger or different terms
  5. Colloquial – common language or regional language
  6. Counterexample – an exception to a proposed general idea
  7. Diatribe – an explosion of harsh language that typically condemns an idea
  8. Diction – words chosen by a writer or speech writer
  9. Dilemma – usually this is an either/or situation; typically, a moral decision.

 

 

 

AP Vocabulary List #3

  1.  Circumlocution – to write around a subject; to write in circles around a topic without really saying anything
  2. Digress – to move off the point or off the topic
  3. Euphemism – a kinder, gentler, less crude word or phrase to replace one that seems inappropriate in a particular situation; a word or phrase that dilutes or lessens the meaning of a more precise word (for example “casualties” for deaths)
  4. Oxymoron – figurative language in which two contradictory words are combined for effect, such “crazy logic”
  5. Metaphor – a comparison of two very unlike things in which one thing IS another (i.e., “Life is a Dream”)
  6. Paradox – the juxtaposition or placing side by side conflicting ideas that reveal a truth or insight

 

 

AP English Language Exam Vocabulary 2

 

  1. Anecdote – a short narrative of an unusual or interesting event that is often included in an essay or speech to clarify abstract points
  2. Anticlimactic (event) – an event that causes disappointment because it is less exciting than was expected (anticlimax)
  3. Antecedent – that which comes before; the antecedent of a pronoun is the noun to which the pronoun refers.  (You may be expected to find this relationship on the exam.)
  4. Antithesis – the opposite of an idea used to emphasize a point; the juxtaposition (placing side by side) of contrasting words or ideas.  Hope is the antithesis of despair.

 

  1. Antithesis, balanced – a figure of speech in which sharply contrasting ideas are juxtaposed in a balanced or parallel phrase of grammatical structure
  2. Apostrophe – a speaker directly addresses something or someone not living that cannot answer back

 

  1. Appeal to authority – in appealing to authority, the writer refers to expert opinion.

 

 

 

 

Oct. 23, 2017

Homework:

1.  Page 241r/245b

2.  Questions on Meaning, #1

3.  Mini Essay (1 page/front-back/skip)

4.  Can be handwritten.  Underline thesis statement.

5.  Due: Wed, Oct. 25

 

 

Oct 20, 2017

Homework:

1.  SOAPSTone for "Batting Clean-Up", page 239r/245b

 

Oct. 17, 2017

Homework:

1.  Page 237r/243b

2.  Suggestions for Writing, #5

3.  Write Mini-Essay (one page, typed)

 

Oct. 16, 2017

1.  Page 235r/241b

2.  Questions on Meaning #1 (front/back/skip)

 

Oct. 10, 2017

1.  Page 211r/208b

2.  Questions on Writing #3 (front/back/skip) - per. 1

3.  Questions on Writing #2 (front/skip) - per. 5

 

Sept. 29, 2017

 

Homework

  1.  Write a 3-paragraph essay on the topic of “Arm Wrestling with My Father,” p. 146r/144b
  2. Include an AP-level thesis statement.
  3. Prompt: Explain how Brad Manning uses a diction of physicality (physical strength, the human body) to describe his relationship with his father.  Include one quote from the Say-Mean-Matter exercise.
  4. One page, typed. Size 12, New Times Roman.  Double space essay.  Single space name, period, date.  Highlight thesis.  Highlight topic sentence in paragraph 2.

 

 

 

Sept. 25, 2017

Homework:

1.  Read the first two pages of "Arm Wrestling with My Father," page 146-7r/page 144-5b

2.  Write 10 words and their definitions.  These should be words that are crucial for understanding the story.

3.  Title:  10 Words "Arm Wrestling"

 

 

Sept. 20, 2017

Homework

1.  Page 151r/149b (Suggestions for Writing, Question #2)

2.  Journal: Write one page/front/back/skip

 

 

Sept. 19, 2017

Homework

1.  Page 101r/96b, Questions on Writing Strategies

2.  Question #1, 1 page/front/skip

 

 

Sept. 13, 2017

HOMEWORK

1. Read "Fish Cheeks" essay, page 99red, 94beige

2.  There may be a quiz on the reading.

Homework

Sept 11, 2017

  1.  Analyze the rhetorical strategies in “Only Daughter” by Sandra Cisneros.
  2. Write one page, front-back, skip lines.
  3. Paragraph one: introduce the text.  Paragraph two: write your analysis
  4. Include at least 3 rhetorical devices; underline the names of the rhetorical devices.
  5. Include at least 2 quotes as evidence of the rhetorical devices.

 

 

 

Homework

Sept 8, 2017

  1.  Read “Only Daughter,” p. 584-587 (red); p. 596-599 (beige)
  2. Read the Biography at https://www.sandracisneros.com/mylifeandwork/
  3. Create a SOAPSTone for “Only Daughter.”  Include the biographical information from the website in the “Speaker” section of the SOAPSTone.  The “Speaker” section should be 5-6 sentences in length.  Do not copy from the website.  Use quotes or paraphrase.  Include the web address in the “Speaker” section of the SOAPSTone.
  4. “Questions on Meaning,” p. 599 (beige), p. 587 (red): Answer question #1 in a one-page typed essay.  Use Times New Roman, size 12 font, double space.  Highlight the thesis statement.
  5. Due Monday, Sept. 11

 

 

Sept 5, 2017

HOMEWORK

1.  Bedford (Red), page 51-61

     Bedford  (beige), page 49-56

2.  SOAPSTone

3.  Due Thursday

 

 

AUGUST 28, 2017

HOMEWORK

1.  Read Bedford Reader, pages 9-12.  In the Red Book, the title of the reading is "Critical Reading."  In the Beige Book, the title is "Reading Critically."  Create a SOAPSTone on your own paper.  DUE TUESDAY.

2.  Study Vocabulary List #1 for a Quiz on Thursday.

 

 

 

AUGUST 21, 2017

HOMEWORK:

1. Study Vocabulary for Quiz on Thursday, August 24

2.  Bring Journal Book for Vocabulary Lists and bring 3-Ring Binder for Binder Check.  Both: Friday, August 25

 

AP English Language Exam Vocabulary 1

 

  1.  Abstraction – a concept or idea without a specific example; idealized generalizations
  2. Abstract noun – ideas or things that can mean many things to many people, such as peace, honor, etc.
  3. Allegory – a narrative or description with a secondary symbolic meaning underlying the literal (true) meaning.  Satirists (critics) sometimes use allegory because it allows them a way to indirectly attack their satirical target
  4. Alliteration – repetition of the same beginning sounds in words
  5. Allusion – a reference to something in culture, history, or literature that expands the depth of the text if the reader makes the connection
  6. Classical Allusion  – a reference to classical (especially, Greek or Roman) myth, literature, or culture
  7. Analogy – a comparison of two things that are similar in several respects in order to prove a  point or clarify an idea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 10, 2017

1.  Read page 290r/294b ("How to Poison..."): DIDLS/SSTone

2.  Read page 340r/344b ("I Want a Wife"): DIDLS/SSTone

3.  Due, Monday, April 17

 

April 10, 2017

 

AP Vocabulary Most Frequently Used on the Test

  1.  Allusion (allude to) – a reference to something in culture, history, or literature that expands our understanding of the text
  2. Analogy – a comparison of two things that are similar
  3. Anecdote – a short, interesting story placed within an essay, speech, etc.
  4. Antithesis – the opposite of an idea that is used to make a point
  5. Apostrophe – a speaker addresses something or someone who is dead
  6. Appeal to authority - a type of logical claim or appeal to an expert
  7. Circumlocution – to write or speak around a subject, going in circles
  8. Digress – to move off the point or topic one is trying to state
  9. Euphemism – a kind word that replaces a harder, ruder word
  10. Imagery – words that describe what we see, smell, taste, touch, hear
  11. Metaphor – analogy or comparison of two very different things in which ONE very different thing IS another
  12. Oxymoron – combining two contradictory words or concepts (deafening silence)
  13. Paradox – the juxtaposition (placing side by side) of two conflicting ideas to reveal a truth
  14. Parallel structure/syntax- placing parallel elements in sentences or in the structure of a text
  15. Understatement – saying less than is necessary to emphasize a reality

 

 

 

Homework, March 30

1.  Write 2 AP LEVEL thesis statement for each numbered AP Lang. Prompt.  Thesis should be a complex sentence that presents an argument and shows your reader "how you will get there."  

EXAMPLE: By describing the Box Man as dignified and at ease (ARGUMENT), Ascher paints a vivid picture of a man who chose a life of comfort and solitude and defeated loneliness by becoming his own friend (WHERE I'M GOING/ HOW I WILL PROVE MY ARGUMENT).

 

 

Homework, March 27

1.  OPTIC, Cartoon.   Page 802.  Topic: Slang

2.  Bring book.

 

Homework, March 24

1.  OPTIC, "Butterflies," p. 560

2.  Bring book.

 

Homework, March 23

1.  OPTIC: "Chicago," p. 793

2.  Bring book, vocabulary cards

 

 

Homework, March 22

1.  Analyze the rhetorical strategies/figurative language in Anne Sexton's "Young."  Include 3-4 quotes.

2.  Bring book, vocabulary cards.

 

Homework, March 21

1.  Writing Practice:  Explain how Dickinson uses language to present the subject of death.  Include 3-4 quotes.

2.  Bring book, vocabulary cards.

 

Homework, March 20

1.  Writing Practice:  Emily Dickinson implies that eternity is certain.  Support, oppose, or qualify this argument in the American context.  

2.  Bring book, vocabulary cards.

 

Homework, March 13

1.  Support, oppose, or qualify (both) Baca's statement that prison will take almost everything from you.  -- one page, skip, both sides

2.  Bring book, vocabulary cards

 

 

Homework, March 9

1.  Support, oppose, or qualify (both) the argument that human beings should respect the natural environment.  -- one page, skip, both sides

 

Homework, March 8

1. Support, oppose, or qualify (both) Chief Joseph's statement that he should "fight no more forever." - one page, skip, both sides

 

 

Homework, March 7

1.  Analyze the rhetorical strategies in Langston Huges' "I, Too" - one page on the front

2.  Bring vocabulary cards and book

 

 

Homework, March 6

1.  Read poem, "I, Too"

2.  Writing Practice. Prompt: Qualify the argument that African Americans are voiceless.  ("My Guilt," p. 422) - one page, skip, both sides

3.  Bring book

 

REVISED.  DUE, MONDAY, MARCH 13, 2017

 

Homework: Synthesis Essay

Prompt: In his essay, “Close Encounters with US Immigration,” Adnan Khan states that during his three-hour ordeal of trying to cross from Canada into the U.S. after 9/11, he “had been made to feel like an unwanted outsider...guilty of (a) crime.”  In a two-page, typed essay that synthesizes the articles “Apple, Google...” and “To Mexicans…,” defend, challenge, or qualify Khan’s statement.

-defend – agree with

-challenge – argue against

-qualify – do both

 

Guidelines:

-Use a minimum of 2 quotes and maximum of 3 quotes or paraphrase per paragraph.

-Quotes may not be more than 12-words long

-Use parenthetical citations (Shipp) in the paragraphs at the end of the quote or paraphrase.

-Page 3 of your essay will be a bibliography in MLA (Modern Language Association) format.

 

 

 

 

 

Research Paper/Synthesis Essay

Prompt: Beginning October 14, 2016, students were assigned to bring in an article on a specific research topic with the goal of collecting 4 articles and their bibliographic information.  The articles can represent different sides of your topic, i.e., they can argue for or against the topic.  After reading and analyzing these articles, you must now formulate a position on your topic that you clearly state in a claim that supports, opposes, or qualifies (sees both sides) a specific point of view.  Write a 3-page essay in which you clearly state and argue your position while synthesizing 3 or 4 of your articles.  Make certain not to paraphrase or summarize.  Page 4 of your essay will be a bibliography of your sources (articles).  The final essay must be typed, double-spaced, 12-point font, Times New Roman.  You will turn in the written first draft and the typed final copy.

 

 

 

Homework: Synthesis Essay

Prompt: In his essay, “Close Encounters with US Immigration,” Adnan Khan states that during his three-hour ordeal of trying to cross from Canada into the U.S. after 9/11, he “had been made to feel like an unwanted outsider...guilty of (a) crime.”  In a two-page, typed essay that synthesizes the articles “Apple, Google...” and “To Mexicans…,” defend, challenge, or qualify Khan’s statement.

-defend – agree with

-challenge – argue against

-qualify – do both

 

 

Classwork and Homework, Friday, Feb. 17

 1.  Read "Apple, Google, Facebook and Microsoft file opposition to Trump's travel ban" by Alex Hern,  FROM INTERNET.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/feb/06/apple-google-facebook-and-microsoft-file-opposition-to-donald-trump-immigration-ban

2.  Create SOAPSTone.  For TONE, focus on diction.

3.  Read "To Mexicans, US democracy is important.  Now, Trump's rhetoric is calling that into question" by Jesus Velasco, FROM INTERNET.

blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/2016/08/04/to-mexicans-us-democracy-is-important-now-trumps-rhetoric-is-calling-that-into-question/

4.  Create SOAPSTone.  For TONE, focus on diction.

PREPARE FOR QUIZ.

-Sunday, 2/19, 1:00 P.M.

 

 

Homework, Feb 14

1.  Add 4-5 logical claims to "Close Encounters" SOAPSTone (Logical Claim - facts, numbers, expert opinion)

 

Homework, Feb. 13

1.  Add 5 emotional claims to "Close Encounters" SOAPSTone

 

 

Homework, Feb. 8, 2017

1.  Read "Close Encounters," p. 558 red, 570 beige

2.  Complete SOAPSTone

3.  Write thesis/introductory paragraph for research paper (on the topic of your articles).

4.  Bring 4 research articles to class for a grade.

 

 

Homework, February 7, 2017

1.  Read "Close Encounters..", p. 558 (red), p. 570 (beige)

2.  Quiz?

 

 

AP Vocabulary List #12

85. Conservatism – belief in maintaining political and social traditions

86. Egalitarianism – belief that humans ought to be equal in rights and privileges

87. Egoism – doctrine or belief that that the pursuit of self-interest is good

88. Fascism – a political philosophy that puts nation and sometimes race above the individual and that has an all-powerful government headed by a dictator who       suppresses the opposition

89. Fatalism – a belief that events in history and a person’s life are fixed and humans are powerless

90. Feminism – belief in the liberation of women in a society so that they are equal to men

 

 

 

Homework, February 3, 2017

1.  Read essay beginning on p. 558 (red), 575 (beige)

2.  Write a counterargument, skip lines, front and back.

 

 

Homework: January 31, 2017

 

AP Vocabulary List #11

79.  Anarchism – doctrine that all governments should be abolished

80 . Atheism – belief that there is no god

81. Bipartisanism – the state of being composed of two parties or two parties cooperating, as in government

82. Capitalism – doctrine that private ownership and free markets should govern economics

83. Collectivism – doctrine of communal control of means of production

84. Communism – a theory or system in which all property is owned by all the people equally, with its administration vested by them in the state or in the community

 

 

 

 

 

Homework: January 30, 2017

Homework

January 30, 2017

  1.  Read “Live Free and Starve” (p. 442 – red; p. 448 – beige)
  2. Complete DIDLS
  3. Write vocabulary on the back of DIDLS
  4. Be prepared for a quiz
  1. Bring 2 iPhone articles on Wednesday
  1.  Indenture (noun) – to give a contract in which a person is bound to do a job
  2. Ban (verb) – to prohibit; to stop
  3. Ventilate (verb) – to provide air
  4. Leisure (noun) – relaxation
  5. Frail (adjective)- weak
  6. Reluctant (adj.)- hesitant; cautious
  7. Capsize (verb) -to turn over
  8. Raft (noun) – boat
  9. Mire (verb) – to get stuck
  10. Blithe (adj.) – happy; carefree
  11. Render (verb) – to cause to become; to make

 

 

Homework: January 25, 2017

1.  Read "Of Course Your iPhone Does Not Exploit Chinese Workers"

2.  Write a list of Cause and Effect Situations that are a counterargument to "Does Your iPhone Exploit"

3.  Due Thursday

 

 

 

Homework:  January 23, 2017

1.  Study for Quiz - Friday, January 27

 

AP Vocabulary List #10

 73.  Vernacular – the ordinary, everyday speech of a region

 74. Emotive language – language that expresses emotion

 75.  Denotation – dictionary definition for a word

 76. Connotation – suggested meaning of a word or phrase

 77. Slanted Language – language that presents a particular viewpoint in a biased or prejudiced manner

 78. Cliché – a phrase or expression that has been used so often that it has lost its value

 

 

Homework: January 18, 2017

1.  Read "Does Your iphone Exploit...?"

2.  Complete Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer

3.  Due Friday

 

 

Homework: January 17, 2017
 

Study for Quiz --Friday, January 20

 

AP Vocabulary List #9

 

     67.Symbol – a thing, idea, or person that stands for something else

     68.Syntax – the order of words in a sentence; also the types and structures of sentences

     69.Thesis – the main idea of the essay; what the writer hopes to prove is true

     70.Tone – the speaker’s (author’s, narrator’s) attitude toward a person, place, idea, or thing

     71.Truism -  a statement that is obviously true and says nothing new or interesting

     72.Understatement – saying less than is necessary by the situation in order to emphasize reality

 

 

 

 

Holiday Homework (oxymoron) – Dec. 2016

  1.  Read the American novel, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  2. For each chapter, write a journal (on regular paper, no journal books) that lists the author’s rhetorical strategies (i.e., DIDLS – diction, imagery, details, language, syntax or SOAPSTone – speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone) and argument.
  3. The writing can be a combination of sentences and lists.  It does not have to be pure paragraph form.  It is not necessary to skip lines
  4. Writing one page on one side should be sufficient for each chapter. 
  5. On the back of the page write 5 new words from the chapter and their definitions.
  6. There are 9 chapters.  When you are finished, you should have 9 pages, and you will staple them together.
  7. When you return to school, you will turn in the 9 pages for a grade, and you should be prepared to write an in-class essay about the book.
  8. Due: January 9, 2017

 

 

AP Vocabulary Quiz #3

 

       15.Circumlocution – the act of writing around a subject; writing evasively to say nothing

      16. Digress (digression) – to move off the point

      17.Euphemism – a kinder, gentler word that replaces a harsh word

      18.Imagery – language that evokes the senses; words that describe what we can see, taste, touch, hear, smell

      19.Metaphor – a comparison of two unlike things in which one thing is another

      20.Oxymoron – a figure of speech in which two contradictory elements are combined for effect, such as “deafening silence”

      21.Paradox – the juxtaposition (putting together) of conflicting ideas that reveal a truth or insight

      22. Parallel structure/syntax – the use of parallel elements in sentences or in the structures of an essay or paragraph

      23. Understatement – saying less than is necessary in order to emphasize reality

 

 

 

 

Homework- Dec. 2

Vocabulary Cards

  1.  Bring the 66 vocabulary cards (numbered 1-66) to class.
  2. Cards must have vocabulary word on one side and the definition on the other.
  3. Cards need your name and last name written in ink on the “word side” of the card.
  4. No white-out on names.
  5. Due Monday, Dec. 5

Pride Essay

  1.  Write a 3-paragraph essay describing what you are proud of in your cultural heritage.
  2. Include an extended definition for beauty as modeled in the “Pride” essay page 507(r), 505 (b)
  3. Due Thursday, Nov. 8

 

 

AP English Language Exam Vocabulary 1

 

  1.  Abstraction – a concept or idea without a specific example; idealized generalizations
  2. Abstract noun – ideas or things that can mean many things to many people, such as peace, honor, etc.
  3. Allegory – a narrative or description with a secondary symbolic meaning underlying the literal (true) meaning.  Satirists (critics) sometimes use allegory because it allows them a way to indirectly attack their satirical target
  4. Alliteration – repetition of the same beginning sounds in words
  5. Allusion – a reference to something in culture, history, or literature that expands the depth of the text if the reader makes the connection
  6. Classical Allusion  – a reference to classical (especially, Greek or Roman) myth, literature, or culture
  7. Analogy – a comparison of two things that are similar in several respects in order to prove a  point or clarify an idea

 

 

 

 

AP English Language Exam Vocabulary 2

 

  1. Anecdote – a short narrative of an unusual or interesting event that is often included in an essay or speech to clarify abstract points
  2. Anticlimactic (event) – an event that causes disappointment because it is less exciting than was expected (anticlimax)
  3. Antecedent – that which comes before; the antecedent of a pronoun is the noun to which the pronoun refers.  (You may be expected to find this relationship on the exam.)
  4. Antithesis – the opposite of an idea used to emphasize a point; the juxtaposition (placing side by side) of contrasting words or ideas.  Hope is the antithesis of despair.

 

  1. Antithesis, balanced – a figure of speech in which sharply contrasting ideas are juxtaposed in a balanced or parallel phrase of grammatical structure
  2. Apostrophe – a speaker directly addresses something or someone not living that cannot answer back

 

  1. Appeal to authority – in appealing to authority, the writer refers to expert opinion

 

 

 

AP Vocabulary Quiz #4

  1.  Assertion – the claim or point the author is making
  2. Bias -  a preference for or an inclination towards one side over another
  3. Candor – open and honest communication
  4. Circular reasoning – a type of faulty reasoning in which a writer attempts to support a statement by simply repeating the statement in stronger or different terms
  5. Colloquial – common language or regional language
  6. Counterexample – an exception to a proposed general idea
  7. Diatribe – an explosion of harsh language that typically condemns an idea
  8. Diction – words chosen by a writer or speech writer
  9. Dilemma �� usually this is an either/or situation; typically, a moral decision

 

 

 

 

AP Vocabulary Quiz #5

Quiz – Thursday, Oct. 6

  1.  Double entendre – a phrase or saying that has two meanings
  2.  Ellipsis – a mark or series of marks (…) used in writing to indicate an omission (missing) letters or words
  3. Empirical, empiricism – knowledge based on experience or observation; the view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge
  4. Episodic – appearing in episodes, a long string of short, individual scenes, stories, or sections
  5. Epigram – a short quotation or verse that precedes text that sets a tone or gives some other context for the text
  6. Ethos -  a speaker or writer’s credibility; his or her character, honesty, etc.
  7. Exemplar – an example, especially one that is a model to emulate or aim for
  8. Explicit – made obvious or clear

 

 

 

AP Vocabulary Quiz #6

 

  1. Fallacy – an error in reasoning based on incorrect evidence
  2. Figurative language – language that uses figures of speech such as metaphors, similes, personification, etc.
  3. Footnote – an explanatory reference at the bottom of the page of a text
  4. Hyperbole – an exaggeration or overstatement (example: I’m so hungry, I can eat a cow.)
  5. Idealism – the act or practice of viewing things in an ideal form as they should be or as you would like them to be
  6. Idiom – two or more words which when used together, take on a new meaning (example: “what’s up?” for how are you; “kick the bucket” meaning to die)
  7. Implicit – meaning that is implied or suggested (opposite of explicit)

 

 

 

 

 

AP Vocabulary List #7

 

  1.  Ironic commentary – writing in which the writer does not mean what he writes; the writer’s position is contradictory
  2. Juxtapose – to place ideas, images side by side to show similarities or differences
  3. Maxim – a saying or expression that proposes to teach or tell a truth
  4. Mock – to make fun of
  5. Musing – quiet reflection on a topic
  6. Naivete – innocence; lack of worldly knowledge
  7. Neutrality – not taking a position; staying out of an argument
  8. Onomatopoeia – words that represent a sound
  9. Over generalization – hasty generalization; drawing a conclusion from insufficient evidence

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homework – Nov. 7, 2016

  1. Read “Pride,” p. 505-7 (red), p. 503-505 (beige)
  2. Complete a DIDLS
  3. Write 10 examples of either compound or complex sentences.  (Do not use the last paragraph.)  Underline the independent clauses.  Circle the dependent clauses.  Label the sentence as compound or complex.

 

  1. Compound (2 or more independent clauses, usually joined by a conjunction such as “and”, “but,” etc.):  “This is an area where men to tend to feel very sensitive and

 

women tend to be extremely callous.”(Barry, “Batting Clean Up,” p. 240)

 

  1. Complex: (at least one independent clause and dependent clauses): “The opposite side

 

of the coin, of course, is sports.” (Barry, p. 240)

  1.  Write 5 simple sentences (UNDERLINE/LABEL: subject-verb-object): “They love giving attention to every detail.” (Britt, “Neat People,” p. 234)

 

  1.  Highlight the punctuation (periods, commas, etc.)
  2. Due Thursday, Nov. 10

 

 

Homework, Nov. 7

1.  Study vocabulary for Quiz on Wed, Nov. 9

 

AP Vocabulary List #8 (Nos. 57-66)

  1. Parody - A humorous imitation of an original text meant to ridicule; used as a technique in satire
  2. Pathos – elements in a text that appeal to the audience’s emotion
  3. Personification – to give human attributes or qualities to something that is nonliving or nonhuman
  4. Propaganda – information that is spread for the purpose of promoting some cause
  5. Rebuttal – to give an opposing point of view
  6. Rhetorical question – a figure of speech in the form of a question posed for its persuasive effect without the expectation of a reply
  7. Rhetorical strategy – various strategies and appeals that writers use to persuade
  8. Satire – a type of literature (or a rhetorical strategy) that exposes human foolishness through humor, exaggeration, and irony
  9. Staccato phrases -  phrases composed of a series of short, sharp sounds or words
  10. Suspense – as aspect of plot or narrative in which the author withholds information creating an urgent need to know in the reader

 

 

 

 

 

Homework, Oct. 25

1.  Read p.  384-386

2.  Create DIDLS

3.  Due, Thursday, Oct. 27

 

 

 

AP Vocabulary List #8 - Quiz, Thursday, Oct. 27

  1. Parody - A humorous imitation of an original text meant to ridicule; used as a technique in satire
  2. Pathos – elements in a text that appeal to the audience’s emotion
  3. Personification – to give human attributes or qualities to something that is nonliving or nonhuman
  4. Propaganda – information that is spread for the purpose of promoting some cause
  5. Rebuttal – to give an opposing point of view
  6. Rhetorical question – a figure of speech in the form of a question posed for its persuasive effect without the expectation of a reply
  7. Rhetorical strategy – various strategies and appeals that writers use to persuade
  8. Satire – a type of literature (or a rhetorical strategy) that exposes human foolishness through humor, exaggeration, and irony
  9. Staccato phrases -  phrases composed of a series of short, sharp sounds or words
  10. Suspense – as aspect of plot or narrative in which the author withholds information creating an urgent need to know in the reader

 

 

Factoid Friday

 

-Every other Friday beginning October 14 students will bring an article on their on their topic from a different source with an index card attached containing the bibliographic information.One of the articles must be a visual or graphic (cartoon, graph, photo, etc.).  The articles must represent different sides of your topic and be taken from sources appropriate to college level research.

 

-Every 3 or 4 weeks each student will do an infomercial on their topics.In the first they will take a stand to persuade their audience.In the second they will argue the opposing side.The third will be a qualified argument.Each infomercial will contain a two-minute question and answer period from peers.

Bibliography

Newspaper or Magazine Article: Author’s Name, Title of the Article, Title of the Periodical,  Date of Publication, Inclusive Page Numbers of the Article.

 

Hoover, Eric.“New Attacks on Early Decision.” Chronicle of Higher Education.11 Jan 2002: 45-46.

 

Internet Source: Author’s Name, Title of the Article, Title of the Database, Date of Electronic Publication, Date When you Accessed the Source, Network Address or URL

 

Mistral, Gabriela.“Silueta de Sor Juana Ines.” Abside.Feb 1998.3 Oct. 2016

http://www.darmouth.edu/-sorjuana/Commentaries/Mistral.html

 

 

Factoid Friday Questions

 

  1. What is your research topic?
  2.  What is the title of your article?
  3. Who is the author?
  4. Which magazine, webzine, newspaper, or online newspaper published it?
  5. When was it published?
  6. How many pages does your article have?
  7. What date was it published?
  8. What is the main argument?
  9. Do you agree or disagree with the argument in the article?
  10. Why is this topic important to the world?
  11. What is one memorable fact from this article?
  12. What did this article make you change your ideas about?
  13. Does this article support your topic (pro) or does it argue against it (con)?
  14. What is something the writer of this article does well?
  15. What is something the writer of this article could improve?