Curriculum: What We Are Learning in Term 2

                 

Ontario Ministry Curriculum (Grade 4)    Ontario Ministry Curriculum (Grade 5)

LANGUAGE (Term 2):                                                                                                     

In Term Two, we will be focusing on recognizing and using text forms (i.e., narrative, persuasive text), text features (i.e., table of contents, captions, text boxes), and stylistic elements (i.e., similes, personification) to help us understand what we read and to help us improve our own writing.  We will also be learning how to identify different points of view and missing voice in text and in our own writing to help us see and consider different perspectives and ideas.  In writing, we will also be reviewing parts of speech and writing conventions (i.e., punctuation, spelling) and applying these to our writing using the writing process, with a focus on revising, editing, and proofreading our work, using words of increasing complexity.  In media literacy, students will continue to study different media forms and techniques used to persuade audiences and will be creating their own media texts across the different subject areas.  For Oral Communication, students will be focusing on developing their speaking skills and to help them communicate during oral presentations, a persuasive speech, and small and whole class discussions, collaborations, and role plays. 

By the end of Grade 4, students will: 

  • use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes (Oral Communication)

  • recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning (Reading)

  • identify a variety of text features and explain how they help readers understand texts (e.g., the back cover copy for a book helps readers decide whether the book will interest them; titles, subtitles, captions, labels, a menu allow the reader to skim a text to get a general idea of what it is about) (Reading)
  • identify the point of view presented in a text, citing supporting evidence from the text, and suggest some possiblealternative perspectives (e.g., identify wordsor phrases that reveal the point of viewpresented; write a letter or use role play to present the perspective of a character whose voice is not heard in the text) (Teacher prompt: “Whose voice/opinion is missing from this text? Why do you think it has been left out of the text? What words might you give to this missing voice?”) (Reading)

  • draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational, literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience (Writing)

  • use specific words and phrases to create an intended impression (e.g., comparative adjectives such as faster; words that create specific effects through sound, as in alliteration for emphasis: rotten rain(Writing)

  • identify their point of view and other possible points of view on the topic, and determine whether their information sufficiently supports their own view (Teacher prompt: “Have you included enough details that support your point of view? What facts or details that you have left out would challenge your point of view?”) (Writing)

  • use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively (Writing)

  • demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts (Media Literacy)
  • create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques (Media Literacy)

By the end of Grade 5, students will: 

  • use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes (Oral Communication)

  • recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning (Reading)

  • identify a variety of text features and explain how they help readers understand texts (e.g., indexes, maps, charts, lists, photographs, menus, glossaries, tables of contents help the reader locate and verify information) (Reading)
  • identify the point of view presented in texts, ask questions to identify missing or possible alternative points of view, and suggest some possible alternative perspectives (e.g., ask why the perspective of certain characters in a story is not presented and include some missing voices in a dramatization of a text; with a partner, role-play an interview with a person who represents one of the missing voices) (Teacher prompts: “Whose point of viewis fully explored? Why?” “Do you see any evidence of stereotyping in this text?”) (Reading)

  • draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational, literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience (Writing)

  • use some vivid and/or figurative language and innovative expressions to add interest (e.g., some comparative adjectives; similes or personification; comparative adverbs: more slowly) (Writing)

  • identify their point of view and other possible points of view, and determine, when appropriate, if their own view is balanced and supported by evidence (Teacher prompt: “Identify a point of view other than your own and list the arguments that would support it. Have you included evidence in your work that would answer these arguments?”) (Writing)

  • use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work effectively (Writing)

  • demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts (Media Literacy)
  • create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques (Media Literacy)

 

MATHEMATICS (Term 2):

We will continue to develop our knowledge and application of mathematical skills and concepts in all five mathematical strands this term, while continuing to integrate the number sense strand with the other four math strands and the mathematical processes (i.e., Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proving, Reflecting, Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies, Connecting, Representing, and Communicating).  

By the end of Grade 4, students will: 

  • read, represent, compare, and order simple fractions, and demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by fractional amounts (Number Sense and Numeration)

  • solve problems involving the addition ,subtraction, multiplication, and division of single-and multi-digit whole numbers, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to tenths, using a variety of strategies (Number Sense and Numeration)

  • demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating whole-number unit rates (Number Sense and Numeration)

  • determine the relationships among units and measurable attributes, including the area and perimeter of rectangles (Measurement)
  • identify and describe the location of an object, using a grid map, and reflect two-dimensional shapes (Geometry and Spatial Sense)

  • demonstrate an understanding of equality between pairs of expressions, using addition, subtraction, and multiplication                  (Patterning and Algebra)
  • predict the results of a simple probability experiment, then conduct the experiment and compare the prediction to the results               (Data Management)

By the end of Grade 5, students will: 

  • read, represent, compare, and order proper and improper fractions, and demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by 0.01 (Number Sense and Numeration)

  • solve problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit whole numbers, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to hundredths, using a variety of strategiesm (Number Sense and Numeration)

  • demonstrate an understanding of proportional reasoning by investigating whole-number rates (Number Sense and Numeration)

  • determine the relationships among units and measurable attributes, including the area of a rectangle and the volume of a rectangular prism (Measurement)
  • identify and describe the location of an object, using the cardinal directions, and translate two-dimensional shapes                           (Geometry and Spatial Sense)

  • demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of the use of variables in equations (Patterning and Algebra)
  • represent as a fraction the probability that a specific outcome will occur in a simple probability experiment, using systematic lists and area models (Data Management)

 

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (Term 2):

The two units that we will be studying in Science & Technology this term are Pulleys and Gears (Understanding Structures and Mechanisms) and Rocks and Minerals (Understanding Earth and Space Systems) in Grade 4 and Forces Acting on Structures and Mechanisms (Understanding Structures and Mechanisms) and Conservation of Energy and Resources (Understanding Earth and Space Systems) in Grade 5.  Students will be exploring these units using the STEAM approach which integrates science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and the Arts using the scientific inquiry model.

By the end of Grade 4, students will: 

Pulleys and Gears (Understanding Structures and Mechanisms)

  • evaluate the impact of pulleys and gears on society and the environment

  • investigate ways in which pulleys and gears modify the speed and direction of, and the force exerted on, moving objects

  • demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles and functions of pulley systems and gear systems

Rocks and Minerals (Understanding Earth and Space Systems)

  • assess the social and environmental impacts of human uses of rocks and minerals

  • investigate, test, and compare the physical properties of rocks and minerals

  • demonstrate an understanding of the physical properties of rocks and minerals

By the end of Grade 5, students will: 

Forces Acting on Structures and Mechanisms (Understanding Structures and Mechanisms)

  • analyse social and environmental impacts of forces acting on structures and mechanisms

  • investigate forces that act on structures and mechanisms

  • identify forces that act on and within structures and mechanisms, and describe the effects of these forces on structures and mechanisms

Conservation of Energy and Resources (Understanding Earth and Space Systems)

  • analyse the immediate and long-term effects of energy and resource use on society and the environment, and evaluate options for conserving energy and resources

  • investigate energy transformation and conservation

  • demonstrate an understanding of the various forms and sources of energy and the ways in which energy can be transformed and conserved

 

SOCIAL STUDIES (Term 1):

In Term 2, Grade 4 students  will develop their understanding of how we study the past, as they use various methods to examine social  organization, daily life, and the relationship with the environment in different societies that existed to 1500 CE, including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society in what would eventually become Canada. Students will build on what they have learned in earlier grades, using visual evidence, primary and secondary sources, and thematic maps to investigate a number of early societies from different regions and eras and representing different cultures. Students will investigate the interrelationship between daily life and the environment in these societies and will compare aspects of life in these societies with that in present-day Canada. 

By the end of Grade 4, students will: 

Strand A: Heritage and Identity: Early Societies to 1500 CE

  • A1. Application: compare key aspects of life in a few early societies (to 1500), including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, each from a different region and era and representing a different culture, and describe some key similarities and differences between these early societies and present-day Canadian society (FOCUS ON: Continuity and Change; Perspective)
  • A2. Inquiry: use the social studies inquiry process to investigate ways of life and relationships with the environment in a few early societies (to 1500), including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, with an emphasis on aspects of the interrelationship between the environment and life in those societies (FOCUS ON: Interrelationships)
  • A3. Understanding Context: demonstrate an understanding of key aspects of a few early societies

    (to 1500), including at least one First Nation and one Inuit society, each from a different region and era and representing a different culture, with reference to their political and social organization, daily life, and relationships with the environment and with each other (FOCUS ON: Significance)

In Term 2, Grade 5 students will learn about key characteristics of various Indigenous nations and European settler communities prior to 1713, in what would eventually become Canada. Using primary sources, such as treaties, historical images, and diaries, as well as secondary sources, they will investigate, from a variety of perspectives, relationships within and interactions between these communities as well as the impact of colonialism. They will develop their understanding of how historical events during this time have had an impact on present-day Canada.

By the end of Grade 5, students will: 

Strand A: Heritage and Identity: Interactions of Indigenous Peoples and Europeans Prior to 1713, In What Would Eventually Become Canada

  • A1. Application:analysesomekeyshort-andlong-termconsequencesofinteractionsamongIndigenous peoples, among Europeans, and between Indigenous and European people prior to 1713 in what would eventually become Canada (FOCUS ON: Cause and Consequence; Continuity and Change)
  • A2. Inquiry: use the social studies inquiry process to investigate aspects of the interactions among Indigenous peoples, among Europeans, and between Indigenous and European people prior to 1713 in what would eventually become Canada, from the perspectives of the various groups involved (FOCUS ON: Interrelationships; Perspective)
  • A3. Understanding Context: describe significant features of and interactions among Indigenouspeoples, among Europeans, and between Indigenous and European people prior to 1713 in what would eventually become Canada (FOCUS ON: Significance; Interrelationships)