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Program of Studies

McGavock High School Program of Studies

 

School Mission

The mission of McGavock Comprehensive High School is to maximize learning through a diverse curriculum for all students in a safe, secure and nurturing learning community which will equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to master and exceed the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools and Tennessee Board of Education standards and to make productive decisions for their futures

 

Vision

McGavock Comprehensive High School is committed to providing a quality education that will develop graduates who appreciate human value, meet the challenges of living in a global environment, contribute positively to their community, and become lifelong learners by providing the opportunity to engage in the best instructional practices that respond to the needs of the citizenry of the 21st century, while respecting and building upon the culturally diverse roots of our community.

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To meet the requirements for all diplomas, a student must have attained an approved attendance, conduct and subject matter record, which includes a completed graduation path.

 

The Regular Diploma shall be awarded to students who:

• Earn the specified 22 units of credit or satisfactorily completes an Individualized Education Program (IEP)

• Pass the TCAP Gateway exams in Algebra I, Biology I and English II

 

The Academic Honors Diploma shall be awarded to students who:

• Earn the specified 22 units of credit in the Scholars Program

• Attain an 85-92 average for the high school career

• Pass the TCAP Gateway exams in Algebra I, Biology I and English II

Special Note: The cumulative semester average will be calculated at the end of seven semesters and shall not be rounded.

 

The Distinguished Scholars Diploma shall be awarded to students who:

• Earn the specified 22 units of credit in the Scholars Program

• Attain a 93-100 average for the high school career

• Pass the TCAP Gateway exams in Algebra I, Biology I and English II

Special Note: The cumulative semester average will be calculated at the end of seven semesters and shall not be rounded.

 

The Certificate of Attendance shall be awarded to students who:

• Earn the specified 22 credits

Have not passed the TCAP Gateway exams in Algebra I, Biology I and English II

Special Note: Students receiving the Certificate of Attendance shall not be eligible to participate in Graduation Ceremonies but shall receive a certificate of attendance. This may affect college admissions.

 

The Diploma of Specialized Education shall be awarded to students who:

• Complete an Individualized Education Program

• Have not passed the TCAP Gateway exams in Algebra I, Biology I, and English

 

Exchanging the Certificate of Attendance or the Specialized Diploma for a Regular Education Diploma

There are only two types of diplomas (the certificate of attendance or the specialized education diploma) that may be exchanged for a regular diploma.

To exchange a certificate of attendance:

• The individual must pass the TCAP Gateway exams in Algebra I, Biology I, and English II.

• The individual must also earn the appropriate 22 units of credit to obtain a regular diploma.

To exchange a specialized education diploma:

• The individual must pass the TCAP Gateway exams in Algebra I, Biology I, and English II.

• The individual must also meet all the goals of his/her Individualized Education Program to obtain a regular diploma.

 

Requirements for a Regular High School Diploma

Core Courses

Credits Required

English

4

Math (including Algebra I)

3

Science (including both Biology and a physical science)

3

Social studies

U.S. History – 1 credit

Economics – ½ credit

Government – ½ credit

World Geography, World History,

AP World Geography, AP World History,

AP European History, or Ancient History

coupled with Modern History - 1 credit**

3

Physical Education

1

Lifetime Wellness

1

 

 

University Path Technical Path

Course

Credits

Course

Credits

Foreign Language

2 (in the same language)

Technical courses

4 (Focused in a technical area)

Visual or Performing Arts

1

Electives

3

Electives

4

  

TOTAL

22

TOTAL

22

In addition to meeting the core course and path requirements, all students must score "Proficient" on the following Gateway Exams: Algebra I, Biology I and English II.

• University Path students must receive a credit in Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II.

• Technical Path students can only receive a credit for 1 course prior to Algebra I that satisfies the mathematics requirement.

 

** Students are required to take one of these Social Studies courses. If a student chooses to take others, these courses would be electiveRequirements for a Scholars Program Diploma

To provide a more rigorous academic program for achievement-oriented and academically talented students in each school, the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools Board of Education established the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools Scholars Program for the pursuit and recognition of academic excellence. The Scholars Program provides for two levels of achievement: Academic Honors and Distinguished Scholar.

 

Objectives

• To provide more opportunities for in-depth study in all subject areas

• To strengthen academic skills

• To intensify academic achievement

• To improve scores on college admission tests

• To increase options for university admissions, college majors and careers

 

Admission Policy

A student choosing to participate in the Scholars Program should be willing to engage in the rigorous high school curriculum required by the Scholars Program to receive either an Academic Honors Diploma or a Distinguished Scholars Diploma.

Curriculum

The curriculum requirements for Academic Honors or Distinguished Scholar Diplomas are those prescribed by the State Department and Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools. Students must score "Proficient" on the following Gateway Exams: Algebra I, Biology I and English II.

Beginning with the class of 2007, students shall:

Earn eight (8) credits of Honors or Advanced Placement (AP) courses in any subject.

• Six (6) of eight (8) credits must be honors level or above.

• Two (2) of the 8 credits must be Advanced Placement (AP). One of the two AP classes must be in the junior or senior year.

• Two of the Honors or AP credits must be in the junior year and two in the senior year.

Special Note: The student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 85 with no rounding.

 

Scholars Designation/Grades

The averages for Academic Honors and Distinguished Scholar shall be computed from seven semesters. The Valedictorian and Salutatorian shall have earned the highest cumulative grade point averages among the students in the Scholars Program. The overall cumulative average for Distinguished Scholar shall be 93-100 (no rounding). The overall grade average for Academic Honors shall be 85-92 (no rounding). These Scholars designations shall be noted on the student’s transcript and diploma. In computing numerical grades for an Advanced Placement course, five points shall be added to the numerical nine weeks and examination grades. In computing numerical grades for honors courses, three points shall be added to the numerical nine weeks and examination grades. Any student who takes AP examination(s) and pass(es) (AP score of three or above) shall be reimbursed for the cost of the examination(s) by Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools.

Students who take the Scholars Program curriculum and fail to achieve an average of 85 shall have "Scholars Program" stamped on their cumulative record and transcript and will receive a regular diploma.

 

 

 

The Requirements for a Scholars Program Diploma

Earn eight (8) credits of Honors or Advanced Placement (AP) courses in any subject.

1• Six (6) of eight (8) credits must be honors level or above.

2• Two (2) of the 8 credits must be Advanced Placement (AP). One of the two AP classes must be in the junior or senior year.

3• Two of the Honors or AP credits must be in the junior year and two in the senior year.

 

Special Note: The student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 85 with no rounding.

Credits Required

English

4

Math (Algebra I, II and Geometry or Geometry, Algebra II and one advanced math course)

3

Science (including Biology and a physical science)

3

Social Studies

U.S. History (Honors or IB/AP) – 1 credit

Economics – ½ credit

Government – ½ credit

World Geography, World History,

AP World Geography, AP World History,

AP European History or Ancient History

coupled with Modern History - 1 credit**

3

Physical Education

1

Lifetime Wellness

1

 

University Path Technical Path

Course

Credits

Course

Credits

Foreign Language

2 (in the same language)

Technical courses

4 (Focused in a technical area)

Visual or Performing Arts

1

Electives

3

Electives

4

  

TOTAL

22

TOTAL

22

 

In addition to meeting the core course and path requirements, all students must score "Proficient" on the following Gateway Exams: Algebra I, Biology I and English II.

** Students are required to take one of these Social Studies courses. If a student chooses to take others, these courses would be electives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Small Learning Communities

A small learning community (SLC) is defined as an interdisciplinary team of teachers who share a few hundred or fewer students in common for instruction, assume responsibility for their educational progress across years of school, and exercise maximum flexibility to act on knowledge of students’ needs. In 2006, McGavock High School, along with 7 other MNPS high schools, was awarded a federal grant to create small learning communities. The first community that was created was the Ninth Grade Academy. This academy is for all first time ninth graders entering McGavock High School. In 2008, McGavock will offer 7 Career Academies that students can choose from beginning in the tenth grade. Students will choose a pathway within an academy which offers them the opportunity to focus in a specific career or thematic area.

 

SLC Mission

Provide a caring and personalized learning environment in which all students master 21st century skills, acquire universal values, connect to post-secondary and career opportunities, and become successful, contributing members of the global community.

 

Ninth Grade Academy (NGA)

The Ninth Grade Academy is for students entering the ninth grade for the first time. The purpose of this academy is to provide a successful transition from middle school to high school and to provide assistance for students to meet the rigorous standards of the curriculum.

 

NGA Vision

We envision a school where...

There is a mutual respect, honesty, responsibility and cooperation among
the school community.

The environment is a safe, secure, and inviting place.

Challenging curriculum and instruction meets the needs of all students.

Students are competent in 21st century skills that enable them to apply
learning in meaningful context.

All students are proficient in using technology and research skills.

Emphasize skills and behavior needed to promote a smooth transition into
high school.

Provide skill-deficient students with additional support to attain necessary
skill levels.Goals for the Ninth Grade Academy

All students will graduate with 21st century skills and achievements.

Schools will be personalized and decentralized.

Curriculum and instruction will be rigorous and relevant.

Students will be connected to post-secondary and career opportunities.

Improve attendance rate.

Implement interventions necessary to ensure continuous learning.

Increase involvements and relationships within the school community.

 

NGA Program of Study

Students will have eight class periods on an alternating block schedule. Four periods are considered core ninth grade classes, also called a MESS Team, one period is a physical education credit, one period is a freshman transition course and two periods are electives that the students can choose.

 

Ninth grade students can select from the following class options:

Math

Algebra I or

Algebra I Honors

English

English I or

English I Honors

Science

Biology or

Biology Honors OR

Physical Science or Physical Science Honors

Social Studies

World Geography or

World Geography Honors

Physical Education

PE I and PEII,

JROTC , or

*Marching Band (1/2 cr)

Career Mgmt Success

Intervention Elective

Freshman Seminar,

*AVID, or

Linguistics

Elective**

Fine Art or

Foreign Language

 

*Marching Band is a ½ credit course which must be taken for two years to equal 1 PE credit. It can be paired with a ½ credit of Concert Band for both years to give a fine arts credit as well.

 

*Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is a college preparatory course that requires an application and an interview.

 

**Ninth Grade Elective options include:

Visual Arts I OR Foreign Language (if 1st year was taken in 8th grade for credit

Drama Acting or student plans to take more than two years of a language)

Concert Band (1/2 cr) French, German, Latin, Russian or Spanish I or II

Eurhythmics (Color Guard ½ cr) (Honors sections available)

Mixed Chorus I

Beginning Band

Orchestra I

Class Piano I

 

 

10th-12th Grades Program of Studies

Upon leaving the Ninth Grade Academy students will continue on an eight period alternating block schedule and will take their required courses, but they will have more choices for elective classes. Within these elective classes each student must choose a Career Academy with a focused pathway (See Career Academies).

 

Recommended Course Sequences

 

10th grade

Science

Physical Science

Physical Science Honors, Chemistry,

or Chemistry Honors

Wellness

Lifetime Wellness

English

English II, English II Honors, or World Studies

Math

Geometry,

Geometry Honors, Algebra II, or

Algebra II Honors

Foreign Language

Required

Academy Course

Elective

Elective

 

11th grade

Math

Algebra II,

Algebra II Honors,

or Pre Calculus

English

English III or

English III Honors

Science

Chemistry,

Chemistry Honors, Ecology,

AP Biology, or

AP Chemistry

Social Studies

U.S. History,

U.S. History Honors,

or AP U.S. History

Foreign Language

Required

Academy Course

Elective

Elective

 

12th grade

English

English IV,

English IV Honors, or

AP English

Science

Physics,

AP Biology, or

AP Chemistry

Math

AP Calculus or Discrete Mathematics

Social Studies

Government (1/2 cr) and

Economics (1/2 cr)

 

Required

Academy Course

Elective

Elective

 

 

 

Career and Thematic Development Centers

Beginning in 10th grade, students will select a Career Academy where they will focus on a specific path of study. All students are required to complete their graduation requirements; however, students will also have at least 3 courses in a focus of study. Students will choose a focus from one of the following 7 academies:

Arts and Communication

Business and Information Technology

Education and Human Services

Hospitality and Tourism

Health Science and Natural Resources

Government and Public Administration

Transportation and Engineering Technology

 

 

Arts and Communication

This development center is for those students who have an interest in the visual or performing arts journalism. They can choose a focus in Fine Crafts, Music, Dance, Graphic Communications, or Journalism and Broadcasting which can lead to careers in the following areas:

High School Diploma or On the Job Training

Conductor or Composer

Backup Recording Artist

Music Store Employee

Sculptor or Painter

Performer

Director or Stage Hand

Sign Maker

Cameraman

Associate Degree/Technical Training

Advertising Designer

Art Historian

Fiber Artist

Animator or Book Illustrator

Studio Musician Director

Screen Writer or Author

Performing Artist Manager

Computer Graphic Artist

Baccalaureate/Master’s/Doctorate Degree

Music or Fine Arts Teacher

Vocal Instructor

Booking Agent

Broadway Performer

Designer for Special Effects

Writer or Proofreader

News Broadcaster

Newspaper Editor

 

 

Pathway

Core Pathway Courses

Recommended/Related Courses

Dance

Dance Technique I

Dance Technique II

Dance Technique III

Dance Technique IV

Dance Ensemble

Drama and/or Theater

Fine Crafts

Art I

Fibers and Dyes

Ceramic Construction

Jewelry/Metalsmithing

Expressive Palette

Learning to Look

AP Art Studio

Sculpture

Graphic Communications

Career Management Success

Visual Communications

Graphic Communications I

Graphic Communications II

Yearbook

Newspaper

Journalism and Broadcasting

Career Management Success

Media Concepts

Electronic Media Production

Electronic Media Management

Yearbook and/or Newspaper

Speech Arts and/or Speech Debate

Drama and/or Theater

Music:

Band or Choral

Marching Band/Wind Ens. I

Marching Band/Wind Ens. II

Marching Band/Wind Ens. III

or

Chorus I

Chorus II

Chorus III

Marching Band/Wind Ens. IV

Drama and/or Theater

Music Theory

Chorus IV

 

Business and Information Technology

This development center is for those students who have an interest in working in a large corporation or owning their own business. They can choose a focus in human resources, business management, administrative and information support, communications development, interactive multimedia, electronic publishing, and web design which can lead to careers in the following areas:

High School Diploma or On the Job Training

Web Designer

Account Collector

Administrative Assistant

Bank Teller or Cashier

Bookkeeper

File Clerk

Receptionist

Retail Sales Clerk

Associate Degree/Technical Training

Multimedia Designer

Accounting Clerk

Claims Adjuster

Secretary or Clerical Supervisor

Court Reporter

Credit Analyst

Customer Service Representative

Desktop Publisher

Loan Officer

Real Estate Agent

Baccalaureate/Master’s/Doctorate Degree

Multimedia Specialist

Accountant or Actuary

Auditor

Bank Administrator

Business Teacher

Chief Executive or Financial Officer

Credit Manager

Financial Planner

Human Resources Manager

Entrepreneur

 

 

Pathway

Core Pathway Courses

Recommended/Related Courses

Human Resources

Keyboarding/Document Formatting

Keyboarding/Document Layout

E-Business Communications

Interactive Multimedia

Integrated Input Technologies

Business Management

Financial Planning

Accounting I

Accounting II

Business Management

Advanced Mathematics

Administrative and Information Support

Keyboarding/Document Formatting

Keyboarding/Document Layout

Database Design

E-Business Communications

Administrative Management

 

Communications Development

Keyboarding/Document Formatting

Keyboarding/Document Layout

E-Business Communications

Administrative Management

Interactive Multimedia

 

Interactive Multimedia

Computer Applications

Interactive Multimedia

Desktop Publishing

 

Electronic Publishing

Keyboarding/Document Formatting

Keyboarding/Document Layout

E-Business Communications

Desktop Publishing

Career Connections

 

Web Design

Keyboarding/Document Formatting

Keyboarding/Document Layout

Web Design I

Web Design II

Web Design III

 

Recommended Extra Curricular Activities:

FBLA

 

Education and Human Services

This development center is for those students who have an interest in helping others. They can choose a focus in family and community services, counseling and mental health services, interior design and consumer services which can lead to careers in the following areas:

High School Diploma or On the Job Training

Salesperson

Nanny

Childcare Worker

Youth and Community Worker

Associate Degree/Technical Training

Interior Designer

Medical Aide or Technician

Baccalaureate/Master’s/Doctorate Degree

Doctor

Social Worker

School Psychologist

Nutritionist

Special Education Teacher

 

 

Pathway

Core Pathway Courses

Recommended/Related Courses

Family and Community Services

Family and Consumer Science

Family and Parenting Education

Child Development

Interpersonal Communication

Career Connections

Adult Living

 

Counseling and Mental Health Services

Family and Consumer Science

Family and Parenting Education

Child Development

Interpersonal Communication

Career Connections

Nutrition and Foods

Peer Tutoring

Anatomy and Physiology

Interior Design/Consumer Services

Family and Consumer Science

Consumer Economics

Textiles and Apparel

Housing and Interior Design

Interpersonal Communication

Career Connections

 

Recommended Extra Curricular Activities:

FCCLA

Community Service Organizations

 

Hospitality and Tourism

This development center is for those students who have an interest in culinary arts, hotel management, and entertainment industries. They can choose a focus in Food and Beverage Services, Hospitality Management and Lodging, and Recreation and Entertainment which can lead to careers in the following areas:

High School Diploma or On the Job Training

Assistant Chef

Hotel Clerk

Caterer

Receptionist

Associate Degree/Technical Training

Chef

Special Events Coordinator

Travel Agent

Hotel Manager

Baccalaureate/Master’s/Doctorate Degree

Chef

Sports Agent

Advertising Manager

Restaurateur

Marketing Manager

 

 

Pathway

Core Pathway Courses

Recommended/Related Courses

Food and Beverage Services

Career Management Success

Culinary Arts I

Culinary Arts II

Culinary Arts III

Hospitality Management and Lodging

Marketing I

Travel and Tourism

Hospitality Management

Career Management Success

Recreation and Entertainment

Marketing I

Travel and Tourism

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Career Management Success

 

Recommended Extra Curricular Activities:

DECA

 

 

Health Science and Natural Resources

This development center is for those students who have an interest in culinary arts, hotel management, and entertainment industries. They can choose a focus in Food and Beverage Services, Hospitality Management and Lodging, and Recreation and Entertainment which can lead to careers in the following areas:

High School Diploma or On the Job Training

Assistant Chef

Hotel Clerk

Caterer

Receptionist

Associate Degree/Technical Training

Chef

Special Events Coordinator

Travel Agent

Hotel Manager

Baccalaureate/Master’s/Doctorate Degree

Chef

Sports Agent

Advertising Manager

Restaurateur

Marketing Manager

 

 

Pathway

Core Pathway Courses

Recommended/Related Courses

Food and Beverage Services

Career Management Success

Culinary Arts I

Culinary Arts II

Culinary Arts III

Hospitality Management and Lodging

Marketing I

Travel and Tourism

Hospitality Management

Career Management Success

Recreation and Entertainment

Marketing I

Travel and Tourism

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Career Management Success

 

Recommended Extra Curricular Activities:

DECA

 

 

Leadership, Education and Cultural Studies

This development center is for those students who have an interest in the humanities, public service and education. They can choose a focus in leadership studies, AVID, JROTC, educational studies, language studies, world studies, and literary studies which can lead to careers in the following areas:

High School Diploma or On the Job Training

City Worker

Police Officer

Fire Fighter

Associate Degree/Technical Training

Case Worker

Court Reporter

Job Supervisor

Office Manager

Police Administrator

Baccalaureate/Master’s/Doctorate Degree

Teacher

Lawyer

Writer

Military Officer

Foreign Language Translator

U.S. Government Employee

 

 

Pathway

Core Pathway Courses

Recommended/Related Courses

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)

AVID I

AVID II

AVID III

AVID IV

Speech Arts

Educational Studies

Art I

Child Development

Psychology and Sociology

Peer Tutoring

Speech Arts

Critical Thinking

JROTC

JROTC I

JROTC II
JROTC III

JROTC IV

Leadership I

Critical Thinking

Language Studies

3 years of the same foreign language

A fourth year of a language

AP language course

A second foreign language

Leadership Studies

Speech Arts

Leadership I

Leadership II

Peer Tutoring

Speech Debate

Critical Thinking

Literary Studies

Imaginative Writing

Critical Thinking

Shakespeare

Speech Debate

Cinema Studies

World Studies

World Geography Honors or AP

World History Studies

European Studies

AP US History

Contemporary Issues

African American History

AP US Government

Psychology

Sociology

Critical Thinking

 

Recommended Extra Curricular Activities:

Student Council

 

 

Architecture, Science Technology, and Transportation

This development center is for those students who have an interest in math and/or science. They can choose a focus in design and preconstruction, horticulture, engineering, or automotive technology which can lead to careers in the following areas:

High School Diploma or On the Job Training

Air Traffic Controller

Assembler

Construction Laborer

Landscape Design

Mechanic

Associate Degree/Technical Training

Air Traffic Controller

CAD Technician

Civil Engineering Technician

Electrical Engineering Technician

Operations Manager

Production Manager

Baccalaureate/Master’s/Doctorate Degree

Aeronautical Engineer

Mechanical Engineer

Agricultural Engineer

Airline Pilot

Architect

Astronaut

Transportation

Environmental Engineer

Automotive Designer

 

 

Pathway

Core Pathway Courses

Recommended/Related Courses

Automotive Technology

Transportation Core or Career Management Success

Brake Systems

Suspension and Steering

Electrical/Electronic Systems

Advanced Mathematics

Design and Preconstruction

Career Management Success

Computer Aided Drafting

Advanced Computer Aided Drafting

Principles of Engineering

Advanced Mathematics

Engineering

Innovations and Inventions

Technological Systems

Engineering Processes

Problems and Solutions in Technology

Advanced Mathematics

Horticulture

Greenhouse Management

Exterior/Interior Landscaping

Horticulture Technologies

Hydroponics

Advanced Mathematics

AP Environmental Science

 

Recommended Extra Curricular Activities:

Skills USA

 

Course Descriptions

The following is a list of courses offered at McGavock High School. All courses are one credit unless otherwise noted.

 

 

 

Career and Technical Education

 

VOC8160 Career Management Success

Career Management Success is a core course for any of the career clusters and is recommended for 9th graders. The course provides students with the tools for achieving success in their academic, work and personal lives. Course content emphasizes the basic skills and knowledge needed for employment success as identified by industry and supported by relevant national standards. All course content is presented in a real-world context, providing concrete opportunities for developing personal and career goals, effective communication skills, teamwork abilities and successful work attitudes. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to complete Professional Development Program Level I and Level II of Skills USA or other degree programs in other career and technical youth organizations.

 

IND8001 Jobs for Tennessee Graduates

This course offers a school-to-work transition curriculum for seniors. The focus includes career exploration, job attainment, job survival, leadership, and self-development skills. Assistance with job placement upon graduation and a nine-month follow-up is a vital part of the program.

 

Architecture, Science Technology, and Transportation

VO8431 Advanced Computer Aided Drafting

Recommended Prerequisites: Computer Aided Drafting and Algebra I

Computer-Aided Design is a course in which students will learn to use a CAD program to create engineering drawings including: plan drawings, assembly drawings, welding and process drawings, cross sections, 3D representations and bills of materials. This course consists primarily of individual drawing projects, with some group projects. Emphasis is on drawing projects of increasing complexity.

 

VO8531 Computer Aided Drafting

Engineering Design/CAD is a course in which students learn the basic concepts of scale drawings and orthographic projections by making simple two-and three-dimensional drawings using manual drafting tools and computer-aided design (CAD). Course content will enable students to make the transition into the use of CAD software by having them make increasingly sophisticated drawings. Students will work in teams and will culminate in a class project to create a complete set of construction and assembly drawings for a mechanical product.

 

IND3812 Engineering Processes

Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry

This is an overview course that introduces students to the concepts and practices that underlie careers in engineering and engineering technology. The course integrates STEM (Science, Technology Engineering and Mathematics) into pre-engineering activities. Students acquire knowledge and skills in engineering problem solving and explore requirements for engineering careers. The purpose of Engineering Processes is to expose students to project-based learning activities using advanced mathematics, design, pre-engineering concepts, use of time studies and problem solving using both classroom and on-line materials. Students will also be required to perform research and upper level literacy in technology engineering education. This course is designed to provide information and experiences to help students adapt them-selves to the workforce and the changing demands that will be placed on the engineering workforce in the 21st century. It will help students develop skills in problem solving, teamwork, time management, computer skills, and engineering systems.

 

IND8192 Innovations and Inventions

This course will enable students to further develop technological literacy skills and should be offered as an integral component of the core school curriculum. Integrated academics combined with hands-on program of study teaches about the development and applications of technology, and the effects technology has on individuals, society and the environment. This course teaches students how to use, man-age, process and assess technology in a contextual learning environment. This course integrates the three (3) Gateway courses throughout the learning expectations and is articulated in all of the sample performance tasks. It is designed as a foundations problem-solving course for students in the ninth grade.

 

VO8150 Principles of Engineering

Recommended Prerequisites: Engineering Design/CAD, Algebra I and Geometry

Principles of Engineering is a course in which students explore the nature of engineering and the skills fundamental to all engineering fields, as well as the role of quality-assurance and quality control procedures in manufacturing. Emphasis is placed on actual projects and presentations and the use of modern tools (e.g., CAD). The course can be enhanced by cooperation with local manufacturing facilities that can provide real measurement data and opportunities for on-site visits to witness engineering tasks, projects and quality-control data collection.

 

IND3813 Problems and Solutions in Technology

Recommended Prerequisites: Two sequential courses and have passed Gateway English

Problems and Solutions in Technology is a research course which allows students to develop advanced technical knowledge and skills by solving problems in one or more of the technology systems: communication, computer applications, construction, energy, power, transportation, manufacturing, and bio-related technology. In this research course, students develop and apply the knowledge and skills gained in previous coursed to identify and resolve relevant problems. This course is designed to give students the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills gained in several courses and apply the skills to new situations. The course integrates mathematics, science, language arts, and social studies competencies in a contextual setting using Project-Based Learning Activities as performance tasks. A culminating research/project report is required to satisfactorily complete this research course.

 

 

IND3811 Technological Systems

Recommended Prerequisite: Innovations and Inventions

This is an overview course designed to introduce students to the application of technology to solve problems and meet human needs and wants. Laboratory experiences are focused on the technology systems of bio-related technology, communication, computer applications, construction, energy, power, transportation, and manufacturing. Students will study concepts about technological systems and influences these systems have at home, in communities, and at work. The content of the course includes, but is not limited to the study of systems of technology, application of technology, de-sign/problem solving, evolving technologies, safety, maintenance, entrepreneurship, leadership, careers, and marketing.

 

AGR8673 Exterior and Interior Landscaping

Exterior and Interior Landscaping includes standards to prepare students for creating aesthetic environments for homes and industries. As the population expands and economies grow, the demand for planned and creative exterior and interior landscapes increases.

 

AGR8675 Greenhouse Management

Greenhouse Management sets a foundation for progress in the horticulture sub-cluster area. As populations continue to expand, the importance of food productions in a condensed, climate controlled environment increases. Understanding the integrated principles needed for the successful management of a green-house will allow the agricultural industry to continue to produce the quality and quantity of food and fiber needed in the 21st century.

 

AGR8120 Horticulture Technologies

Horticulture Technologies includes standards that challenge students to plan for future food needs using advanced technologies. These technologies are becoming increasingly important as populations grow and farmland is consumed by urban growth. This will emphasize the benefits of these technologies and how to blend their use with environmental conservation.

 

AGR8140 Hydroponics

Hydroponics includes standards that challenge students to plan for future food needs using advanced technologies and less space. Soil less media are becoming increasingly important as populations grow and farmland is consumed by urban growth. Understanding how the benefits of hydroponics blend with environmental conservation will be emphasized in this course.

 

VO8109 Automotive: Brake Systems

Recommended Prerequisites: Transportation Core and Algebra I

Automotive: Brake Systems course offers training in the diagnosis and repair of hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical systems used in standard and anti-lock brake systems. Course content includes diagnosis, repair, and/or service technology of hydraulic and anti-lock brake systems to original equipment manufacturer (OEM) specifications. Educational experiences simulate automotive service industry operations through training aids, laboratory facilities and school-based learning opportunities. Course content prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Brake System test, for entry-level placement in the work-force and for entry into post-secondary education. A minimum of 100 hours must be dedicated to brake systems to meet minimum standards set by NATEF.

 

VO8106 Automotive: Electrical/Electronic Systems (Credit: 1 or 2)

Recommended Prerequisites: Transportation Core and Algebra I

Automotive: Electronic Systems is a course that prepares students for entry-level positions, or advanced training in automotive electrical and electronic systems. Students apply the principles of electronics to auto-motive technology and develop diagnostic skills. The course pro-vides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skill training in the use of digital and analog voltmeters, ohmmeters, and amp-meters, as well as oscilloscopes, test-lights, load-testers and specialized electrical test equipment. Educational experiences simulate automotive service industry operations through the use of training aids and modules and school-based learning opportunities. Course content prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Electrical and Electronics test. A minimum of 200 hours must be dedicated to electrical and electronics to meet minimum standards set by NATEF.

 

VO8107 Automotive: Suspension and Steering

Recommended Prerequisites: Transportation Core and Algebra I Grades

Automotive: Suspension and Steering is a course that prepares students for entry-level positions or advanced training in automotive suspension and steering systems. Course material covers the principles of automotive suspension/steering systems and four-wheel suspension alignment. Course content provides the student with the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by training in wheel alignment and the testing, diagnosis and repair of steering and suspension systems. Lab facilities and experiences simulate automotive service industry operations through the use of training aids and modules and school-based learning opportunities. Course content also prepares students for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Suspension and Steering test. A minimum of 100 hours must be dedicated to suspension and steering to meet minimum standards set by NATEF.

 

VOC8165 Transportation Core

The Transportation Core course prepares students for entry into all subsequent transportation courses. Students explore career opportunities and requirements of a professional service technician. Content emphasizes beginning transportation service skills and workplace success skills. Students study safety, tools, equipment, shop operations and basic technician skills. Upon completion of this course students may enter automotive service technology, diesel equipment maintenance technology, leisure craft service technology, collision repair and refinish technology, or aviation maintenance.

 

Arts and Communication

VO8180 Electronic Media Management and Operations

Recommended Prerequisites: Media Concepts and Electronic Media Production

This course is offered in the Journal-ism and Broadcasting sub-cluster to students who have completed Electronic Media Concepts and Electronic Media Production, or obtained the instructor’s approval. This course focuses on simulated real-life electronic broadcasting media production and management activities and productions. Projects center on in-house productions of newscasts, special events and original programming. The student will gain valuable insight into both audio and video sides of the electronic media industry. Course content is composed of scripting, broadcasting, reporting, directing, editing, budgeting and producing, as well as cameras, lights, sound and set design. This course will explore the latest digital technology and applications, research and future trends in the electronic media industry. Upon completion of this course students will be prepared to pursue postsecondary education or enter the electronic media industry in an entry-level position. The educational laboratories will assimilate broadcast facilities in the electronic media industry.

 

VO8179 Electronic Media Production

Recommended Prerequisite: Media Concepts

This course is offered in the audio and video technology sub-cluster to students who have completed Media Concepts or obtained instructor’s approval. Course content focuses on electronic media production (EMP) technologies utilizing simulated and/or real-life projects. This course centers on production of various EMP products, including commercials, news, music, and interactive and industrial programming. The student will gain valuable insight into the many facets of EMP production, including but not limited to, concept creation, scripting, sound design, visual design, engineering, editing, budgeting and producing, as well as exploring some of the latest advances in industry technology.

 

VO8175 Graphic Communications I

This course is the first in a series that prepares students for gainful employment and/or entry into post-secondary education in the graphic communications industry. Content provides the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining both the industry and its career opportunities, and by developing leadership, teamwork and industry skills. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the graphic communications industry.

 

VO8176 Graphic Communications II

Recommended Prerequisite: Graphic Communications I

This course is the second level of Graphic Communications. It pre-pares students for work-related and advancement into graphic design and digital imagining for gainful employment and/or post-secondary education in the graphic communications industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills in both theory and practical application. Advanced knowledge and skills in the printing industry will be enhanced in a laboratory setting that duplicates the printing industry and offers school/work based learning opportunities.

 

VO8178 Media Concepts

This course is offered for students interested in either the Audio and Video Technologies sub-cluster, or the Journalism and Broadcasting sub-cluster of the Arts and Communication cluster. The overlap in these industries is extensive as can be witnessed in television, film, music, radio, newspaper, Web-cast and entertainment. This course is the entry-level course to prepare students for the media industry. Course content provides a broad-based exposure to audio, video, and journalism and broadcasting within the media industry. Upon completion of this course students will be prepared to pursue advanced coursework in either audio and video technology or journalism and broadcasting.

 

VO8174 Visual Communications

This course provides a foundation in aesthetic concepts and applies these concepts to the visual art, design, printing and photography industries. Course content provides the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining both the visual communications industry, and its career opportunities by developing leadership, teamwork and technical skills. Varying degrees of aesthetics are required along with the ability to interpret many aspects of life and technology.

 

Business and Information Technology

BUS7115 Accounting I

This full-year course introduces concepts and principles based on a double-entry system of maintaining the financial records of a sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. It includes analyzing business transactions, journalizing, posting, and preparing worksheets and financial statements.

 

BUS7215 Accounting II

Recommended Prerequisite: Accounting I

This full-year course is an advanced study of concepts, principles and techniques that build on the competencies acquired in Accounting I used in keeping the electronic and manual financial records of a sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. Departmental management, cost and not-for-profit accounting systems are also covered.

 

BUS7252 Administrative Management

This capstone course provides advanced training, including hands-on experiences, for students pursuing a career in business technology. Skills developed in previous courses will be incorporated and enhanced through a multi-tasking environment using a variety of input technologies. Procedures and concepts related to information processing systems, administrative/information management, problem solving, reasoning, teambuilding, time management, business standards, feasibility studies, cost/budgeting, professional leadership, ethical and legal issues, mathematics and communications. Production and administrative skills will be developed to meet industry’s standards. Students will play a variety of roles in completing tasks. Team activities will be evaluated as a group. Collaboration with other courses can enhance a student’s learning and expand their experiences. This course may articulate to a post-secondary program.

 

BUS7512 Business Management

Students will develop a foundation in the many activities, problems and decisions that are intrinsic to the management of a successful business, as well as an appreciation for the importance of these responsibilities. Areas to be examined include business organization, ethical and legal responsibilities, communication, decision-making, personnel, safety, professional development and related careers. By gaining an understanding of these areas, students will be better prepared to enhance the business decisions of tomorrow.

BUS3718 Computer Applications

This course is designed to develop computer technology skills. Students will use a variety of computer software and hardware tools and features of an electronic information network. Students will explore the historical, social and ethical issues of using computer technology. The students will develop skills that will assist them with efficient production, accurate production analysis, management of information, and design and presentation of a multimedia project.

 

BUS7191 Database Design/ Management (Credit: ½)

The students will analyze and apply database design techniques and management methods for organizing and maintaining files. The student will apply keying, typography, and layout and design skills in creating, designing, entering data, importing and exporting data, and printing database object and data. At the completion of the course, students will have database management skills enabling them to design and implement a relational database application. Student proficiency could lead to software certification

 

BUS7184 Desktop Publishing

The student will apply keying, for-matting, typography, and layout and design skill in developing electronic publishing documents. The student will develop skills in electronic publishing design, layout, composition, and photo journalism. Content provides the opportunity to acquire marketable skills and to prepare for gainful employment and or retry into postsecondary education in the graphic communications industry. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the graphic communications industry.

 

BUS7291 E-Business Communications

Recommended Prerequisite: Keyboarding/Document Layout and Design

This course is the study of oral, written and electronic communications in a global society. Components of communications include the sender, the message, the receiver, the feedback, and the channel. The purposes of communication are to build goodwill, persuade, obtain or share information, and build self-esteem. The Internet will be used to develop concepts related to web browsers, navigators, search engines, on-line communication methods, home and website design concepts, transfer of data, downloading files, security procedures and Inter-net navigational tools. The student will choose and use the appropriate tools when completing Internet applications using the Internet for re-search and validation of research data for written and oral business communications. Emphasis will be placed on electronic research, security issues, ethics business report writing, business correspondence, enhancement of oral presentations with electronic media and communications applying current technology.

 

BUS7514 Financial Planning (Credit: ½)

This course is designed to develop skills in the use of financial principles in making business decisions. Students will research job qualifications and employment opportunities in finance. The course includes a study of the allocation of financial resources, the effects of the finance and credit institutions on the business community, and the impact that financial decisions have on the consumer market. Ethical issues will be presented in this course.

 

BUS7185 Integrated Input Technologies

This is a capstone course in which students will learn necessary skills in problem solving using current and emerging integrated technology to include a variety of input technologies such as advanced keyboarding, scanning, speech recognition, hand-writing recognition, and the use of a mouse in the production of mailable business documents. The course focuses on student choice, accountability and competency. Students work toward the attainment of high-level employable competencies in areas which may include (but are not limited to) integrated software applications, computer systems, communication systems, networking, ethical issues, human relations, leadership self-management, and workplace management. Students may choose areas of specialization and achieve industry certification in areas such as word processing, spreadsheet applications, database design and management, multimedia presentations, schedule and contact management, etc. This course may articulate to post-secondary education.

 

BUS7617 Interactive Multimedia Presentations

The student will apply keying, typography, layout and design skills in this course. The student will be proficient in using interactive multimedia tools to develop electronic presentations. Creative design, persuasive communications, and language arts skills are applied through research, evaluation, validation, written, and oral communication. Typography, layout and design guidelines are applied. Copyright laws and ethical practices are reinforced in creating and formatting various presentations that require imported data/graphics, digital, audio, and video clips. Team development will be stressed as students work on multimedia project(s). Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in business and industry.

 

BUS7318 Keyboarding/Document Formatting (Credit: ½)

This course is a continuation of the Keyboarding course. Student will prepare business and academic report, etc. The student will demonstrate a combination of input skills (advanced keyboarding, scanning, speech recognition, handwriting recognition, and the use of a mouse) in the production of mailable business documents. Industry production standards are emphasized. Formatting, typography, layout and design concepts will be applied in document preparation of business letters, forms, invoices, manuscripts, and tabulated and columnar information. Proofreading and editing skills are applied.

 

BUS7155 Keyboarding/ Document Layout and Design (Credit: ½)

This course builds on Keyboarding/Document Formatting course. Student proficiency can lead to software certification. The student will use a hands-on approach to develop proficiency in document creation and design. Emphasis is on production of business applications including design and layout, speed and accuracy. Concepts, capabilities, procedures, and legal responsibilities of word processing and information processing will be applied. Simulated real projects from rough draft copy and/or transcription magnetic media are used for problem solving and business document preparation.

 

BUS7186 Spreadsheet Applications (Credit: ½)

The course content involves the use of electronic worksheets to perform business calculations. This course will apply keying, typography, layout and design skills in designing worksheets, writing formulas, analyzing data, charting data and managing data. Team development will also be stressed as students work on spreadsheet project(s).

 

 

BUS3762 Virtual Enterprise International

Recommended Prerequisite: Business Management

Virtual Enterprise International (VE) is a simulated business environment. The VE students will be involved in actual on the job work experiences, including accounting, personnel administration, management, and marketing. The only difference between the VE and an actual business is that no material goods are produced or legal tender exchanged. However, services will be provided. Working in a team, the student will develop and enhance oral and writ-ten communication skills through initiative, responsibility, and creativity. The VE experience will weave together several academic disciplines and occupational subjects, thereby overcoming fragmentation of subjects. The course will link learning to application and real life experiences. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in business and industry. The Virtual Enterprise International course may substitute for Economics credit.

 

VO8181 Web Site I - Fundamentals

This course, which is the first level of Web Page Design, prepares students with work-related skills for advancement into post-secondary education of industry. Course content includes exposure to basic Web design and the dynamics of networking/internetworking, Web hosting and Web design in e-commerce. The course content provides students the opportunity to acquire fundamental skills in both theory and practical application of Web design and of leadership and interpersonal skill development. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the Web page design and construction industry.

 

VO8281 Web Page Design II- Site Designer

Recommended Prerequisites: Web Site I and Algebra I

This course, which is the second level of Web Page Design concentration, prepares students with work-related skills for advancement into postsecondary education or industry. Course content includes exposure to basic and advanced Web design, pixilated and vector-based Web graphics, Web animations, and the dynamics of Web hosting and Web design in e-commerce. The course content provides students the opportunity to acquire fundamental skills in both theory and practical application of Web design, and of leadership and interpersonal skill development. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the Web page design and construction industry. Further, this course provides for and directly maps to the Certified Internet Webmaster "Site Designer" national certification examination.

 

VO8381 Web Page Design III- eCommerce

Recommended Prerequisites: Web Site I, Web Page Design II, and Algebra I

Web Page Design III – eCommerce corresponds to the CIW certification "Web eCommerce" which is the third level of Web Page Design. This course prepares students with work-related skills for advancement into postsecondary education or industry. Course content includes exposure to Web design in eCommerce with marketing, customer relations, and commercial Web site publication. The course content provides students the opportunity to acquire fundamental skills in practical application of Web development, leader-ship, and interpersonal skill development. Laboratory facilities and experiences simulate those found in the Web page design and Web page construction industry.

 

 

Human Services

FCS8381 Adult Living

Adult Living is a course designed to empower students to take action for the well being of themselves and others as they effectively manage the roles and responsibilities created by families, career and community interactions. Focusing on the young adults, the course content includes skills and knowledge to enable students to maintain an optimum living environment by making responsible young adult decisions. Students learn to plan and set goals for a career, manage multiple roles, maintain respectful and caring relationships with improved communication skills, understand the responsibilities of parenting, cope with stress and crisis situations, provide for health and well-being, and function as informed consumers.

 

FCS8190 Career Connections (Credit: ½)

Recommended Prerequisite: Interpersonal Communications

Career Connections is designed to provide students with an understanding of how to plan for and manage careers in a continuously changing workplace. Students will learn the importance of exploring multiple career paths. Instruction will include strategies for engaging in life-long learning, addressing the continuous process of learning new skills, adapting decision-making and problem-solving skills to changing conditions, managing work and family responsibilities, and working with diverse populations. This course will encompass an individual’s total lifestyle - education, occupation, social responsibility and leisure.

 

FCS8684 Child Development (Credit: ½)

This semester or full-year specialized course prepares students to understand the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of children. The course is designed to help young people acquire knowledge and skills essential to the care and guidance of children as parent or caregiver. Laboratory observations, job shad-owing, or laboratory participation may be included if opportunities are available.

 

FCS8780 Consumer Economics

*Satisfies one-half credit in Economics for graduation. Athletes should check NCAA requirements.

This semester or full-year specialized course is designed to prepare students to understand the United States economic system and how it affects individuals as consumers, producers and citizens. Students will integrate knowledge, skills and practices required for management of resources in a technologically expanding global economy. Consumer practices and decision-making, problem solving, critical thinking, goal setting, management of multiple roles, and using technology are integrated into course content. This course satisfies the Economics credit for graduation.

 

FCS8180 Family and Consumer Sciences

Family and Consumer Sciences is a comprehensive course designed to develop the core knowledge and skills needed for students to manage their lives. Emphasis is on leadership, human development, family and parenting education, consumer economics and resource management, housing and living environments, nutrition and foods, textiles and apparel, and career preparation. Critical skills are reinforced through authentic experiences in decision-making, problem solving, critical thinking, technology, work and family management, and workplace readiness. The course allows students to select specific areas for future concentrated study and should be the foundation course for all vocational Family and Consumer Sciences programs.

 

FCS8683 Family and Parenting Education (Credit: ½)

Family and Parenting Education is a semester course that emphasizes the significance of the family as a basic unit of society and its impact on the well-being of individuals and society. The major focus of this course is preparation for marriage, parenthood and the responsibilities for successful management of family life.

 

FCS8689 Housing and Interior Design (Credit: ½)

Housing and Interior Design pre-pares students to understand the physical, psychological and social influences pertaining to housing decisions. It includes instruction in the human and environmental factors influencing the form and use of housing, varied types of housing, housing costs, interior and exterior design, home furnishings and equipment. The selection, use and care of available resources for achieving improved living space to meet individual and family needs will be included in this course.

 

FCS8686 Interpersonal Communications (Credit: ½)

This specialized course is designed to focus on communications within the areas of personal life, family life, community and workplace. The role of communication in establishing and maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships is emphasized. Communication skills in decision making, problem solving, critical and creative thinking, technology, and workplace readiness practiced in this course will empower students to function effectively as a member of a rapidly changing global community.

 

FCS8585 Nutrition and Foods

This full-year course prepares students to understand the principles of nutrition; the relationship of nutrition to health and well-being; the selection, preparation, and care of food; meal management to meet individual and family food needs and patterns of living; and optimal use of the food dollar.

 

FCS8582 Textiles and Apparel (Credit: ½)

This semester specialized course prepares students to understand the social, psychological and physiological aspects of textiles and apparel products. Instruction in how to select, produce, maintain, and alter textile and apparel products as well as the effect of consumer choices on the needs of the individual and family are included in this course.

 

 

Hospitality and Tourism

VO8151 Culinary Arts I

This course content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills in food preparation and food service. Students will learn and apply the basic principles of safety and sanitation. Instruction will include theory and laboratory work that relate to planning, selecting, purchasing, storing, preparing, and serving food and food products. Laboratory facilities and experiences, which simulate commercial food production and service operations, offer school-based learning opportunities.

 

VO8251 Culinary Arts II

Recommended Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I

Culinary Arts II provides students the opportunities to acquire marketable skills by demonstrating the principles of safety and sanitation, food preparation skills and teamwork to man-age an environment conducive to quality food production and service operations. Additional learning experiences will include a study of foods and their nutritional values, quantity cooking, storing equipment, sanitation in food handling and management. Laboratory facilities and experiences, which simulate commercial food production and service operations, offer school-based learning and work-based opportunities.

 

VO8351 Culinary Arts III

Recommended Prerequisite: Culinary Arts II

This capstone course provides students the opportunity to apply the marketable culinary arts skills they have acquired by assuming increasingly responsible positions including participation in a work-based learning (WBL) experience. Emphasis will be placed on food services required in establishments such as restaurants, cafeterias, tearooms, bakeries, retail food shops, hotels, clubhouses and catering shops.

 

VO8588 Foundations of the Hospitality Industry

This course introduces students to the hospitality industry, its various components and available career opportunities. Content will provide a foundation for further study in the areas of culinary arts, lodging, travel, and tourism. This course should be taught prior to students entering a more specialized area of study and is recommended that the course be offered at the 9th grade level.

 

ME8188 Hospitality Management

Recommended Prerequisite: Marketing and Management I

The changing hospitality industry encompasses growing and varied employment and career advancement opportunities. This course prepares students for gainful employment and/or postsecondary training in the hospitality industry. Content provides students the opportunity to acquire marketable skills by examining the industry, exploring career opportunities and developing the interpersonal and technical skills.

 

ME8169 Marketing and Management I - Principles

This full-year course focuses on the study of marketing concepts and principles, and their practical application. Students will examine risk and challenges marketers face to establish a competitive edge. Subject matter includes economics, marketing foundations/functions and human resource leadership development. Skills in communication, mathematics and psychology are reinforced in this course. This course satisfies the Economics credit for graduation.

 

ME8184 Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Recommended Prerequisite: Marketing and Management I

Sports and entertainment marketing is a specialized course designed to offer students an opportunity to gain knowledge and develop skills in the areas of facility design, merchandising, advertising, public relations/publicity, event marketing, sponsoring, ticket distribution, and career opportunities as they relate to the sports and entertainment industry.

 

ME8271 Travel and Tourism Operations

Recommended Prerequisite: Marketing and Management I

This course is a study of the various components of the travel and tourism industry. Subject matter will include human relations and communication, economics, career paths, marketing strategies, business operations, and organizational and leadership skills.

 

English and English Language Learners

 

ENG1102 English I

This course encompasses a correlated study of reading, language development, literature, composition, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. The course will prepare students to demonstrate success on the TCAP English I End-of-Course Performance Indicators.

 

ENG1103
English I Honors

This course encompasses a correlated study of reading, language development, literature, composition, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. The course will prepare students to demonstrate success on the TCAP English I End-of-Course Performance Indicators. In-depth studies of a broader spectrum of selected literary works will be complemented by numerous writing opportunities.

 

ENG1202
English II

Recommended Prerequisite: English I

This course encompasses a correlated study of literature, language conventions, composition, vocabulary development, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. The course will prepare students to demonstrate success on the TCAP English II Gateway Performance Indicators. This course also requires the reading of six year Essential Literature titles.

 

 

 

ENG1203 English II Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: English I

This course encompasses a correlated study of literature, language conventions, composition, vocabulary development, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. The course will prepare students to demonstrate success on the TCAP English II Gateway Performance Indicators. This course also requires the reading of six Essential Literature titles during the year. In-depth studies of a broader spectrum of selected literary works will be complemented by numerous writing opportunities.

 

ENG1204 English II Honors (World Studies)

Recommended Prerequisite: English I

Arranged in a two-hour team-teaching block, this course integrates the study of world history and literature correlating historical periods and events with literary trends and writings of comparable periods. (Note: One credit is earned for English II Honors and one credit for World History Honors.) This course encompasses a correlated study of literature, language conventions, composition, vocabulary development, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking, and World History. This course also requires the reading of six Essential Literature titles during the school year. The course will prepare students to demonstrate success on the TCAP English II Gateway Performance Indicators.

 

ENG1302 English III

Recommended Prerequisite: English II

This course encompasses a correlated study of literature, language conventions, composition, vocabulary development, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. The course will prepare students to demonstrate success on the TCAP Writing Assessment. This course also requires the reading of six Essential Literature titles during the school year.

 

ENG1303 English III (Honors)

Recommended Prerequisite: English II

This course encompasses a correlated study of literature, language conventions, composition, vocabulary development, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. The course will prepare students to demonstrate success on the TCAP Writing Assessment. This course also requires the reading of six Essential Literature titles during the school year. In-depth studies of a broader spectrum of selected literary works will be complemented by numerous writing opportunities.

 

ENG1402 English IV

Recommended Prerequisite: English III

This course encompasses a correlated study of literature, composition, vocabulary enhancement, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. This course also requires the reading of six Essential Literature titles during the school year.

 

ENG1403 English IV (Honors)

Recommended Prerequisite: English III Honors

This course encompasses a correlated study of literature, composition, vocabulary enhancement, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. This course also requires the reading of six Essential Literature titles during the school year. In-depth studies of a broader spectrum of selected literary works will be complemented by numerous writing opportunities.

 

ENG1408 English - Literature and Composition - AP

Recommended Prerequisite: English III Honors

This course follows the College Board guidelines a rigorous course of study equivalent to a freshman English course in a college or university. The curriculum focuses on helping students in becoming skilled in critical analysis of literature and in expository composition based on literary selections. Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Test.

 

ENG1623 Composition- Advanced

This course emphasizes a study of rhetoric and various modes of writing (e.g., expository, argumentative, and analytical).

 

ENG1416 Critical Thinking

This course emphasizes thinking skills that are highly correlated with those measured on various academic and aptitude tests.

 

ENG1631 Imaginative Writing

This course provides students with the opportunity to express themselves creatively and imaginatively in written forms (e.g., short story, poetry, drama, essay, and prose fiction).

 

ENG1735 Shakespeare Studies I

This course is designed to help students gain a greater appreciation of Shakespeare’s works through an in-depth study of his plays, sonnets and poetry.

 

*ENG1731 Drama: Acting

This course involves students in various aspects of acting improvisation, pantomime, voice and diction, character development and allows for opportunities to participate in scenes, plays and readers’ theater.

 

* ENG1737 Acting- Advanced

Recommended Prerequisite: Drama: Acting

This course is designed to study acting styles using the various techniques accompanying each style. Styles ranging from classical to contemporary drama will be studied and performed.

 

* ENG1745 Introduction to Cinema Studies

This course is designed to study the history of cinema to the creating of cinema.

 

 

ENG1643 Journalism: Publications

Formal classroom study and experience in the production of school publications, newspapers, and literary magazines form the basis for this course.

 

ENG1741 Mass Media (Credit: ½)

This course involves a study of the processes, the contents and effects of mass communication: television, radio, movies, newsprint, recordings, poster art, advertising and popular arts.

 

ENG1701 Speech Arts

This course is based on the District Academic Standards for Listening and Speaking and provides for development in interpersonal and public forms of communication such as conversation, group discussion, various techniques in group dynamics, interviewing, advertising, procedures for conducting meetings, planning and implementing programs. Additional topics may include choral reading, oral interpretation, speech writing, and delivery.

 

ENG1703 Speech Debate

This course encompasses many of the standards listed in the draft document of the District Academic Standards for Listening and Speaking. It is designed to teach the general principles of debate and provide experiences in informal and formal debating. Experiences often include training of debaters for com-petition.

 

* ENG1721 Theater Arts

This course is a study of the elements that comprise the total "theater experience": the script, types of drama, acting, sets, props, lighting, costumes and makeup.

 

(Courses with an * meet the requirements for a fine arts credit.)

ENG1132 ELD I

Recommended Prerequisite: English Proficiency oral levels of Beginner and/or High Beginner and English Proficiency scores of Non English Proficient

It is recommended that ELD I be paired with Reading I - ELD to create a two-hour block for these students.

 

ENG1232 ELD II

Recommended Prerequisite: ELD I or English Proficiency oral levels of Beginner, High Beginner and English Proficiency reading or writing scores of Non English Proficient and/or Limited English Proficient

It is recommended that ELD II be paired with Reading II - ELD to create a two-hour block for these students.

 

ENG1332 ELD III

Recommended Prerequisite: ELD II or English Proficiency oral levels of Beginner, High Beginner, Intermediate and English Proficiency reading and/or writing scores of Limited English Proficient and/or Fully English Proficient

A course of study for non-native speakers of English whose proficiency level is below adopted standards as established by oral and written tests. The course provides for a sequential development of English skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Instruction is based on adopted texts and supplementary materials for each skill level.

 

ENG1432 ELD IV

Recommended Prerequisite: ELD III or English Proficiency levels of Beginner, High Beginner, Intermediate and High Inter-mediate and English Proficiency reading and/or writing scores of Limited English Proficient and/or Fully English Proficient

A course of study for non-native speakers of English whose proficiency level is below adopted standards as established by oral and written tests. The course provides for a sequential development of English skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Instruction is based on adopted texts and supplementary materials for each skill level.

 

ENG1135 Reading I - ELD

Recommended Prerequisite: English Proficiency oral levels of Beginner and/or High Beginner and English Proficiency reading or writing scores of Non English Proficient

A course of study for non-native speakers of English whose proficiency level is below adopted standards as established by oral and written tests. The course provides for a sequential development of English skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Instruction is based on adopted texts and supplementary materials for each skill level.

 

ENG1234 Reading II - ELD

Recommended Prerequisite: ELD I or English Proficiency oral levels of Beginner, High Beginner range and English Proficiency reading or writing scores of Non English Proficient and/or Limited English Proficient

A course of study for non-native speakers of English whose proficiency level is below adopted standards as established by oral and written tests. The course provides for a sequential development of English skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Instruction is based on adopted texts and supplementary materials for each skill level.

 

 

Foreign Language

FLA1140 French I

The emphasis in this course is on developing a solid foundation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills within the context of basic topics. Students use the present tense in conversations. They read short narratives as well as some authentic realia from the francophone world and write short personal paragraphs in French. Culture is taught in context. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1142 French I - Honors

The content of this course is the same as French I with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1240 French II

Recommended Prerequisite: French I

This course expands and strengthens the students’ control of the language. Students learn to express themselves in more complex sentences. Their vocabulary and mastery of basic grammar extends so that students can express themselves more fully and in more tenses. Students are able to understand the main points in general conversations and oral stories. Students read longer narratives and many authentic realia and write longer paragraphs on personal themes. Culture is taught in context as well as through the use of short stories, videos, films, and tapes. The use of the target language by the teacher and the students increases. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1242 French II - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: French I

The content of this course is the same as French II with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1340 French III

Recommended Prerequisite: French I and II

Students review all grammar from French I and II and extend their knowledge to all of the major grammatical and structural items in French. All proficiency skills are enhanced using books, tapes, and authentic Internet sources appropriate to their level. A major focus is improving the students’ conversational skills in French. Compositions, picture descriptions, and some immersion experiences will aid in building the students’ language proficiencies. Culture is presented in context and is the topic for extended class study. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1342 French III - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: French I and II

The content of this course is the same as French III with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1442 French IV Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: French I, II, and III

The content of this course is the same as French IV with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1545 French Language – Advanced Placement

Recommended Prerequisites: French I, II, and III

This course follows the guidelines of the College Board Advanced Placement French Language. It encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. Students taking such a course emphasizing the use of French for active communication have the following objectives: the ability to comprehend formal and informal French; the acquisition of vocabulary and a grasp of structure to allow the easy, accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles, as well as of modern literature in French; the ability to compose expository passages; and the ability to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Students are able to express their ideas on a variety of topics including abstract and concrete themes. Course content is aligned with the College Board’s expectations of an Advanced Placement French Language course.

FLA1150 German I

The emphasis in this course is on developing a solid foundation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills within the context of basic topics. Students use the present tense in conversations. They read short narratives as well as some authentic realia from German culture and write short personal paragraphs in German. Culture is taught in context. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1152 German I - Honors

The content of this course is the same as German I with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1250 German II

Recommended Prerequisite: German I

This course expands and strengthens the students’ control of the language. Students learn to express themselves in more complex sentences. Their vocabulary and mastery of basic grammar extends so that students can express them-selves more fully and in more tenses. Students understand the main points in general conversations and oral stories. Students read longer narratives and many authentic realia and write longer paragraphs on personal themes. Culture is taught in context as well as through the use of short stories, videos, films, and tapes. The use of German by the teacher and the students increases. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1252 German II - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: German I

The content of this course is the same as German II with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1350 German III

Recommended Prerequisite: German I and II

Students review all grammar from German I and II and extend their knowledge to all of the major grammatical and structural items in German. All proficiency skills are enhanced using books, tapes, and authentic Internet sources appropriate to their level. A major focus is improving the students’ conversational skills in German. Compositions, picture descriptions, and some immersion experiences aid in building the students’ language proficiencies. Culture is presented in context and is the topic for extended class study. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1352 German III - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: German I and II

The content of this course is the same as German III with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1452 German IV Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: German I, II, and III

The content of this course is the same as German IV with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1160 Latin I

Reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills focus on similarities between Latin and the students’ own language (i.e., derivatives, grammar and syntax, vocabulary), while building the ability to read and comprehend continuous Latin. The study of Roman culture, history and mythology, lays a base for appreciating Western culture. Basic forms, syntax, vocabulary and culture are taught by readings in English and in Latin, structured practice, and multi-media presentations and projects.

FLA1162 Latin I - Honors

The content of this course is the same as Latin I with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1260 Latin II

Recommended Prerequisites: Latin I

Elementary skills learned in Latin I are reinforced. More complex grammar, where the syntax and conventions of Latin and English differ, is introduced. The study of derivatives, culture, history and mythology continues in greater detail. Students evaluate specific parallels between cultures, particularly the Roman and their own. Practice in reading longer passages of Latin and insight reading is emphasized. By the end of the course students may read selections from Latin authors of medium difficulty such as Julius Caesar and Pliny.

FLA1262 Latin II - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: Latin I

The content of this course is the same as Latin II with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1360 Latin III

Recommended Prerequisites: Latin I and II

Reinforcement of skills developed in Latin I and II continues. Mastery of specialized vocabulary and complex syntax and grammar is emphasized. Less common uses of the subjunctive, impersonal and defective verb forms, and the use of correlatives and idiomatic expressions are introduced. Figures of speech, rhetorical devices, and genre specific forms are studied in context. Students translate and sight read Latin from specific prose authors, such as Cicero, and analyze the author’s work and style as a product of his time and the literary tradition. Course content is aligned with National Standards of Classical Languages developed by ACL and ACTFL.

FLA1362 Latin III - Honors

Recommended Prerequisites: Latin I and II

The content of this course is the same as Latin III with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1462 Latin IV Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: Latin I, II, and III

The content of this course is the same as Latin IV with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1180 Spanish I

The emphasis in this course is on developing a solid foundation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills within the context of basic topics. Students use the pre-sent tense in conversations. They read short narratives as well as some authentic realia from the Hispanic world and write short personal paragraphs in Spanish. Culture is taught in context. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1182 Spanish I - Honors

The content of this course is the same as Spanish I with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1280 Spanish II

Recommended Prerequisite: Spanish I

This course expands and strengthens the students’ control of the language. Students learn to express themselves in more complex sentences. Their vocabulary and mastery of basic grammar extends so that students can express them-selves more fully and in more tenses. Students will be able to understand the main points in general conversations and oral stories. Students read longer narratives and many authentic realia and write longer paragraphs on personal themes. Culture is taught in context as well as through the use of short stories, videos, films, and tapes. The use of the target language by the teacher and the students increases. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1282 Spanish II – Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: Spanish I

This course is the same as standard Spanish II with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA3022 Spanish II Heritage

The course is for native speakers and heritage speakers of Spanish who demonstrate fluency in listening and speaking Spanish. This immersion course is designed to perfect the students’ reading and writing skills. In addition, students focus on grammatical structures to increase their skills. Students undertake an introduction to Hispanic literature, particularly short stories. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales for native speakers.

FLA1380 Spanish III

Recommended Prerequisites: Spanish I and II

The students review all grammar from Spanish I and II and extend their knowledge to all of the major grammatical and structural items in Spanish. All proficiency skills are enhanced using books, tapes, and authentic Internet sources appropriate to their level. Conversational skills are strengthened through projects such as Power Point presentations. Compositions, picture descriptions, and some immersion experiences aid in building the students’ language proficiencies. Culture is presented in context and is the topic for extended class study. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1382 Spanish III – Honors

Recommended Prerequisites: Spanish I and II

This course is the same as standard Spanish III with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA3023 Spanish III Heritage

Recommended Prerequisites: Spanish II Heritage

The course is for native speakers and heritage speakers of Spanish who demonstrate fluency in listening and speaking Spanish. This immersion course is designed to perfect the students’ reading and writing skills. In addition, students focus on grammatical structures to increase their skills. Students undertake an introduction to Hispanic literature, particularly short stories. Course guidelines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales for native speakers.

FLA1482 Spanish IV Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: Spanish I, II, and III

This course focuses on expanding the students’ proficiency in Spanish through immersion. Students and teacher use Spanish as extensively as possible. Some literary selections from poetry, short stories, and/or novels are presented in addition to the textbook selections. Authentic materials or realia, tapes, Internet sources are also used. Class discussions, oral presentations, and technology-based assessments help strengthen the students’ listening and speaking proficiencies. Essays and informal writings aid in developing their writing proficiency. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1692 Spanish V Honors

Recommended Prerequisites: Spanish I-IV

This course’s objectives are to continue the students’ development in Spanish. Students hear and read a variety of authentic texts in order to develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing proficiencies. Independent projects, Internet technology, and service learning projects are used to develop proficiency in real-world areas of interest. Extended group activities, individual projects, and portfolios should be used to provide measures of student progress. Under the TN Framework of Standards for Honors Courses, students must complete projects under the following categories: 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Course guide-lines are aligned with ACTFL’s National Standards and ACTFL’s proficiency scales.

FLA1590 Spanish Language – Advanced Placement

Recommended Prerequisites: Spanish I, II, and III

This course follows the guidelines of the College Board Advanced Placement Spanish Language. It encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. Students taking such a course emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication have the following objectives: the ability to comprehend formal and informal Spanish; the acquisition of vocabulary and a grasp of structure to allow the easy, accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles, as well as of modern literature in Spanish; the ability to compose expository passages; and the ability to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Students will be able to express their ideas on a variety of topics including abstract and concrete themes. Course content is aligned with the College Board’s expectations of an Advanced Placement Spanish Language course.

Mathematics

MTH4111 Algebra I Algebra I develops mathematical concepts through the following strands: number sense and number theory; estimation, measurement and computation; patterns, functions and algebraic thinking; statistics and probability; and spatial sense and geometric concepts. This course incorporates the process standards of representation, communication, problem solving, reasoning and proof, and connections to address the Gateway Mathematics indicators. Appropriate technology and manipulative are used to develop and extend algebraic thinking and to engage student reasoning. Other concepts include analysis of "families of functions (linear and quadratic)," solving systems of equations, graphing and data analysis. Algebra I provides the fundamentals necessary for the further study of mathematics. Students must pass the Gateway Algebra I exam to receive a regular or honors diploma. (MTH4113 Algebra I- Sheltered )

MTH4112 Algebra I - Honors

The content of this course is the same as Algebra I with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended reading assignments, group activities, projects, exploration of the history and culture of the subject, in-depth problem solving experiences, critical analyses, applications, and student presentations are incorporated to enrich basic standards. Student collaboration is expected.

MTH4311 Algebra II

Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry

Algebra II extends the concepts of Algebra I. Linear, absolute value, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational and periodic functions are studied in-depth along with finite and infinite arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. Topics in Statistics and Probability such as the Law of Large Numbers, permutations, combinations, normal distribution and standard deviation are studied as well. The course introduces elementary concepts of Analytic Geometry. Graphing calculators should be used as a tool in this course.

MTH4312 Algebra II - Honors

Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry

The content of this course is the same as Algebra II with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended group activities, individual projects and portfolios are incorporated to provide additional measures of student progress. Extended reading assignments, group activities, projects, exploration of the history and culture of the subject, in-depth problem solving experiences, critical analyses, applications, and student presentations are incorporated to enrich basic standards. Student collaboration is expected.

MTH4116 Algebra Gateway Intervention I

Algebra Gateway Intervention I is an elective credit for students who have not succeeded in passing the Gateway Mathematics exam. It is the first Algebra intervention course in a series of four. The curriculum is focused around the Gateway Mathematics assessment indicators. Students may re-take the Gateway Mathematics test upon competition of this course. Students must pass the Gateway Algebra I exam to receive a regular diploma. (MTH4117 Algebra Gateway Intervention II, MTH4118 Algebra Gateway Intervention III, MTH4119 Algebra Gateway Intervention IV)

MTH4514 Calculus AP - AB

Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Pre-Calculus

Calculus is the mathematics of change and motion. It is a branch of mathematics that enables solution of two large classes of problems. The first involves finding the rate at which a variable quantity is changing and the second is that of finding a function when its rate of change is given. Emphasis is placed both on the theory of Calculus and on problem solving. The curriculum is based on the course outline recommended by the College Board. Only those schools with College Board Approved syllabi will be allowed to award Advanced Placement credit on transcripts. This course is designed to prepare students for the AP examination. The examination contains questions for which a graphing calculator is necessary.

 

MTH4515 Discrete Mathematics with Probability and Statistics

Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II

Discrete Mathematics involves the study of objects and ideas that can be divided into separate or discontinuous parts. Problems to be studied can be classified into three broad categories. The first category, existence problems, deals with whether a given problem has a solution or not. The second category, counting problems, investigates how many solutions may exist for problems with known solutions. A third category, optimization problems, focuses on finding the best solution to a particular problem. This course will acquaint the student with the theory of probability - the mathematics of uncertainty. It will illustrate some applications of probability to statistical theory, and how these applications are applied to practical and scientific problems.

 

MTH4211 Geometry

Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I

This course develops the concepts of plane, solid and coordinate geometry. Proofs, both deductive and inductive, and problem solving strategies are used to develop these concepts. Inquiry, hands-on activities, and technology are employed to assist students in developing logical thought and reasoning processes. The curriculum centers on the integration of skills listed in the MNPS Academic Standards for Geometry. Students in Geometry will be administered a District Geometry Assessment as part of the final exam for the course.

 

MTH4212 Geometry - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I

The content of this course is the same as Geometry with an accelerated pace and more in-depth study. Extended reading assignments, research based writing assignments, projects, exploration of the history and culture of the subject, in-depth problem solving experiences, critical analyses, applications, and student presentations are incorporated to enrich basic standards. Student collaboration is expected. Students will be administered a District Geometry Assessment as part of the final exam for the course.

 

MTH4413 Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry-Honors

Recommended Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II

Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry deals with the topics of vectors, analytic geometry, theory of equations, logic and limits. Included in the course is an in-depth study of the conic sections, higher degree equations, sequences and series, and the fundamental theorem of algebra. This course also includes the study of the properties of the trigonometric functions, their graphs and their applications to various mathematical situations including the solution of triangles. Trigonometry has applications in surveying, navigation, construction work and is particularly essential for higher level courses in mathematics and physics.

 

Non-Departmental

 

ENG1110 Advanced via Individual Determination (AVID) I

AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) is a language arts based curriculum with emphasis on the writing process and writing as a tool of learning. In addition to inquiry and collaboration, AVID also provides students with academic survival skills, i.e., time management, note taking, textbook reading, library research, test taking skills, and study skills. The Cornell note-taking system is taught and students are expected to use this sys-tem in all classes.

 

ENG1210 Advanced via Individual Determination (AVID) II

Recommended Prerequisite: AVID I

AVID II is an elective course whose students receive two hours of instruction per week in college level entry skills, two hours per week in tutor lead study groups, and one hour per week in motivational activities and academic survival skills. Field trips are an important aspect of this program. Students will be required to maintain a notebook and take notes based on the Cornell note-taking system. Grades will be based on the quality of the notebook and notes, presentations, research, and class participation.

 

ENG1310 Advanced via Individual Determination (AVID) III

Recommended Prerequisite: AVID II

As with all AVID courses, the AVID III course features tutors (college students) who lead discussions and analysis of the academic subjects in which the students are enrolled. Students enrolled in AVID III are required to complete weekly timed writings and analytical discourses in all subjects. In addition, students are required to make oral presentations to the class on topics related to college and career searches, college entrance, contemporary issues, and social concerns, all the while focusing on a culminating senior project, paper, and portfolio. AVID III students, working with the tutors, are expected to participate in and eventually serve as moderators for Socratic Seminars. These discussions move beyond didactic instruction and assist students in gaining multiple perspectives on texts, supporting arguments with clear reasoning and evidence, and developing their critical reading and thinking skills to the extent necessary for success in college.

 

ENG1410 Advanced via Individual Determination (AVID) IV

Recommended Prerequisite: AVID III

Students are required to complete a weekly times writing and analytical discourses in all subjects. Analysis must display a depth of typical college level students. An important focus of the fourth year of AVID is to finish all preparation and applications for admission to a four-year university. A culminating senior project, paper and portfolio are presented for evaluation.

 

ENG9395 AVID Tutor

The AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) academic elective class utilizes trained tutors to guide the AVID students toward academic and personal excellence. Tutors are active participants in the learning, growth, and personal development of the AVID students. Seniors may apply to become AVID tutors. To qualify, a student must be a senior who has passed all three Gateway exams. The tutors would also need to be college-bound who have passed or are presently enrolled in Algebra II with a B average and have an overall grade point average of 3.0. Teachers who supervise the students must have completed the Service Learning Training through the Tennessee Department of Education.

 

 

SER9395 Service Learning

This course allows students to earn up to one credit for services in their school or in the local community (i.e. office worker). It empowers students to become personally and socially responsible citizens. Through experience-based learning and service to others, they gain the knowledge and skills necessary to make positive contributions at school, at home, in the community and in the world of work. The teacher of this class must take a State mandated training. Students are asked to keep a journal of their service experiences. The teacher will ask the students to reflect on what they have done and analyze what they have learned. A culminating project is required (i.e.-canned food drive, Angel Tree, etc).

 

Physical Education, Wellness, and JROTC

 

PER3500 Aerobic Fitness (Credit: ½)

This course is designed to provide opportunities to improve cardiovascular fitness and will incorporate health appraisal, fitness evaluation, identification of cardiovascular risk factors and individual exercise prescriptions. This course could include: jogging, aerobic dance, step aerobics, body sculpting, rhythmic activities, power walking, circuit training and knowledge of how to stay aerobically fit for a lifetime.

 

PER3901 JROTC I

PER3902 JROTC II

PER3903 JROTC III

PER3904 JROTC IV

Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps

The mission of Army ROTC is to motivate young people to be better Americans. JROTC is a stimulus which promotes high school graduation as a prerequisite to success in adult life. This program prepares students for responsible leadership roles while making them aware of their rights and privileges, as well as their responsibilities as American citizens. JROTC concentrates on teaching teamwork. Sub-courses include drug resistance, self-esteem, effective communication, physical fitness, marksmanship, history, map reading, first aid and how to lead. This course is open to both male and female students in grades 9-12. There is absolutely no obligation to join the military and no cost to students. The U.S. Army or MNPS will furnish all supplies and equipment.

 

PER3509 Lifetime Activities (Credit: ½)

This course is designed to offer a wide variety of activities that can be pursued throughout a lifetime. Activities could include: tennis, golf, bowling, jogging, power walking, bicycling, roller blading and different dance styles.

 

HLT3801 Lifetime Wellness

This is a one-year continuous course that enables students to understand lifelong health and wellness practices and issues. The course also provides students with the opportunity to participate in fitness activities, and individual and dual sports. No other class can substitute for Lifetime Wellness.

 

 

PER3510 Outdoor Education (Credit: ½)

This course involves the study of and participation in outdoor activities and will include skill development in these areas. Activities may include: rock climbing and rappel-ling, mountain biking, orienteering, camping, fishing, hiking, survival skills, first aid and safety, as well as various other outdoor recreational activities.

 

PER3623 Physical Activity for Stress Management (Credit: ½)

This course is designed to provide a wide variety of physical activities, strategies and techniques to effectively manage stress. Techniques and strategies could include yoga, meditation, Pilates, stretching and flexibility training and others.

 

PER3111 Physical Education I (Credit: ½)

PER3211 Physical Education II (Credit: ½)

PER3311 Physical Education III (Credit: ½)

PER3411 Physical Education IV (Credit: ½)

This is a continuing course that emphasizes maintenance of fitness through a conditioning program and the mastery of multiple skills through continued participation in team games, rhythms and stunts and tumbling, plus the introduction of some individual and recreational sports. All activities are offered in such variety that each student should find something that he/she might enjoy and in which he/she might excel.

 

PER3503 Team Games I (Credit: ½)

This course is a study of and participation in a variety of team games and will include skill development and knowledge of history, rules, strategies and etiquette of these activities. Activities will include: football, volleyball, basketball, soccer, baseball, softball and officiating.

PER3505 Weight Training I (Credit: ½)

PER3506 Weight Training II (Credit: ½)

PER3507 Weight Training III (Credit: ½)

PER3508 Weight Training IV (Credit: ½)

This course is designed to teach students the safe and effective techniques of weight training. The focus of the course will be on upper and lower body strength and endurance training. Activities could include free weights and weight machines.

 

Science

 

SCI6150 Biology I

Biology introduces students to the world of living things. Students will experience the content through inquiry. Using available technology, students will investigate the world around them. The six Gateway Biology standards include: cells, interactions, photosynthesis and respiration, genetic and biotechnology, diversity and biological evaluation. Credit cannot be awarded for both Biology I and Honors Biology I. Students will be administered the TCAP Gateway Biology Test at the conclusion of this course. (SCI6151 Biology I - Sheltered )

 

SCI6155 Biology I - Honors

Biology I Honors deals more extensively with the abstract concepts of biology and incorporates a more extensive practice of higher order thinking skills and science process skills. Honors courses must substantially exceed the content standards and learning experiences of regular courses. Honors courses must incorporate projects, open-ended investigations, technology, and problem solving experiences plus other additional components. Students will study the six Biology standards in depth. Laboratory activities are designed to provide students with creative problem-solving experiences. Credit cannot be awarded for both Biology I and Biology I Honors. Students will be administered the TCAP Gateway Biology Test at the conclusion of this course.

 

SCI6250 Biology II - AP

Recommended Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry I

This course is a continuation and more in-depth study of Biology I and follows the College Board guidelines for AP Biology. This course includes cellular and molecular biology, microbiology, processes of biological investigation with statistical evaluation of data, growth, development and behavior of individuals, science and society, and the literature of biology.

 

SCI6111 Chemistry I

Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I

Students will study the language of chemistry, the states of matter, the structure of matter, the behavior of substances, the chemistry of solutions and chemical bonding. Stu-dents should explore chemistry through inquiry, hands-on laboratory investigations, individual studies and group activities. Their study should include both qualitative and quantitative descriptions of matter, and the changes that matter under-goes. Students should practice the necessary precautions for performing safe inquiries and activities, and appreciate the risks and benefits of producing and using chemical sub-stances. Chemistry is required for all medical and health-oriented careers, as well as careers involving agriculture, engineering and homemaking.

 

SCI6114 Chemistry I - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I

At an accelerated pace and in more depth, students will study the language of chemistry, the states of matter, the structure of matter, the behavior of substances, the chemistry of solutions and chemical bonding. Honors courses must substantially exceed the content standards and learning expectations of regular courses. Honors courses must incorporate projects, open-ended investigations, technology, and problem solving experiences plus other additional components. Students should explore chemistry through inquiry, hands-on laboratory investigations, individual studies and group activities. Their study should include both qualitative and quantitative descriptions of matter, and the changes that matter undergoes. Students should practice the necessary precautions for performing safe inquiries and activities, and appreciate the risks and benefits of producing and using chemical sub-stances. Chemistry is required for all medical and health-oriented careers, as well as careers involving agriculture, engineering and homemaking.

SCI6211 Chemistry II – AP

Recommended Prerequisites: Chemistry I; Algebra II

This course is designed to meet the College Board requirements to pre-pare students to take the AP exam, which may result in the awarding of college credit. The course will cover the atomic structure and the interaction of atoms. Students will study stoichiometry, equation balancing, problem solving, states of matter, oxidation-reduction reactions, equilibrium, kinetics, thermo-dynamics, periodicity of the elements, bonding, basic organic chemistry and environmental chemistry.

 

SCI6501 Ecology

Recommended Prerequisites: Biology I and Physical Science, Chemistry I or Physics

Students will study the many living and non-living cycles in nature, ecological populations and communities, nutritional relationships in nature, food webs and pyramids, ecological succession, energy sources and human interactions with the environment. Concepts from Biology I and Chemistry I will be applied. Many labs and field experiences are included to assist students in learning the science content, as well as addressing personal and civic responsibility and the challenges facing our world – pollution, extinct species, abuse of natural resources and overpopulation.

 

SCI6710 Environmental Science - AP

Recommended Prerequisites: Biology I, Physical Science and Algebra I

This course is designed to meet the College Board requirements to prepare students to take the AP exam, which may result in the awarding of college credit. Students are provided the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, while engaging in laboratory and field investigations. Students are asked to identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and man-made to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions to resolving and/or preventing them.

 

SCI6607 Geology

Recommended Prerequisites: Physical Science, Biology I and Chemistry I, or Physics I

Geology is a course that explores the origins and the connections between the physical, chemical and biological processes of the Earth system. Students will experience the content of geology through investigations and observations both in the field and the laboratory, and through open-ended problem solving via cooperative learning and individual research. Students will focus on the physical aspects of Earth processes and cycles. Maps, minerals, rocks, geologic history, plate tectonics and external land-form morphology are areas of study in geology.

 

SCI6561 Human Anatomy & Physiology- Honors

Recommended Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry I

At a more accelerated pace and in more depth students will study Human Anatomy and Physiology. Honors courses must substantially exceed the content standards and learning expectations of regular courses. Honors courses must in-corporate projects, open-ended investigations, technology, and problem solving experiences plus other additional components. This course is a systematic study of the human body designed for students considering a career in the health field, as well as taking an active part in their own health and wellness. Students will study the body through models, diagrams and/or comparative studies of the anatomy of other organisms. Students will study anatomical orientation; the body systems that provide protection, support, and movement; integration and regulation; transportation; absorption and excretion; and reproduction, growth, and development. This is a laboratory-oriented course involving detailed dissection and experiences related to human physiology, such as: urine analysis, blood counts, blood typing, enzyme studies and bone analysis.

 

SCI6103 Physical Science

Students will study introductory chemistry and physics. This course covers fundamental concepts such as: force, motion, interactions of matter, energy, structure and properties of matter. Students learn the relationships between science and technology, and how science affects all life. Hands-on laboratory investigations, individual studies and group activities should constitute a major portion of the learning experience. Conservation of matter and energy is an underlying theme throughout the course. Physical Science will provide the knowledge, prerequisite skills and habits of mind needed for problem solving and ethical decision-making about matters of scientific and technological concern. Students will be administered the Physical Science end-of-course test at the conclusion of this course. (SCI6104 Physical Science - Sheltered )

 

SCI6105 Physical Science - Honors

At a more accelerated pace students will study introductory chemistry and physics. Honors courses must substantially exceed the con-tent standards and learning expectations of regular courses. Honors courses must incorporate projects, open-ended investigations, technology, and problem solving experiences plus other additional components. This course covers fundamental concepts such as: force, motion, interactions of matter, energy, structure and properties of matter. Students learn the relation-ships between science and technology and how science affects all life. Hands-on laboratory investigations, individual studies and group activities should constitute a major portion of the learning experience. Conservation of matter and energy is an underlying theme throughout the course. Physical Science will provide the knowledge, prerequisite skills and habits of mind needed for problem solving and ethical decision-making about matters of scientific and technological concern. Students will be administered the Physical Science end-of-course test at the conclusion of this course.

 

SCI6122 Physics I - Honors

Recommended Prerequisite: Geometry or Algebra II

At a more accelerated pace and in more depth students will study Human Anatomy and Physiology. Honors courses must substantially exceed the content standards and learning expectations of regular courses. Honors courses must in-corporate projects, open-ended investigations, technology, and problem solving experiences plus other additional components. Physics deals with the relationship between matter and energy, and how they interact. Students will study mechanics; thermodynamics; waves and sound; light and optics; electricity and magnetism; and atomic and nuclear physics. The major emphasis is concept development through inquiry learning and hands-on laboratory experiences, and concept reinforcement through application activities.

 

Social Studies

 

SST5520 African-American Studies (Credit: ½)

This elective course is designed for students who desire a more in-depth study of Black History than they can obtain from other general history classes. Through this course students discover how African Americans have always been an integral part of the American experience from their African roots through slavery and emancipation, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Jim Crow and the Civil Rights Era into contemporary America.

 

SST5540 Contemporary Issues
(Credit: ½)

In this elective course, students study various dynamic issues facing today’s society enabling them to discover their values and responsibilities as citizens in that society. The course will utilize six social studies standards of essential con-tent knowledge and four process skills are integrated for instructional purposes. Students will utilize different learning methods to research, discuss, debate and formulate opinions on those contemporary issues.

 

SST5120 Economics (Credit: ½)

Students explore how people, businesses and governments choose to use resources. This course pro-vides an in-depth study of the American free enterprise system, including micro and macro economics. The role of America’s place in the global economy is also analyzed. Finally, major concepts in personal finance are covered. All students are required to take Economics for graduation.

 

SST5800 Peer Tutoring

This elective course is designed to enable high school students to ac-quire sufficient knowledge and skills to serve as peer tutors for students with disabilities who are integrated into their schools. The curriculum will focus on the following areas: normalization, exceptionalities technology, curriculum, instructional techniques, behavior management and biography/autobiography. This course can be taken for up to two periods per day.

 

 

SST5625 Personal Finance (Credit: ½)

In this elective course, students are exposed to relevant real life topics necessary for establishing a lifelong successful financial picture. A few of the areas studied are Investing/wealth building strategies, retirement plans(Roth IRA, 401K/403B), college planning, dangers of credit, setting up and maintaining a checking account, finding bargains and negotiating techniques. This course is an elective and will not fulfill the graduation requirements for Economics.

 

SST5601 Psychology (Credit: ½)

This elective course is a study of the development of the individual and the personality. Psychology includes the study of the principles of learning and thinking, behavior development, and mental health. This course gives students the opportunity to analyze individual and group behavioral patterns and problems.

 

SST5650 Sociology (Credit: ½)

In this elective course, students study dynamics and models of individual and group relationships. This course stresses man in his social and cultural environment, problems of self-development, communication and social adjustment. Students will attempt to solve current problems such as population growth, minority concerns and ecology.

 

SST5655 Student Leadership I

This elective course is designed to provide a balanced framework for developing leadership skills. Stu-dents in this course will have the opportunity to increase their under-standing and/or effectiveness in communication skills, group processes, managerial skills, self-awareness and human relations.

 

SST5656 Student Leadership II

Recommended Prerequisite: Student Leadership I

This course is designed to strengthen and deepen the leadership skills of students in the high school setting and beyond as they commence with life in the greater community. The program makes three very important assumptions regarding leadership: first, within every individual student exists leadership potential; second, leadership can be taught and therefore learned; and third, students can develop their own unique leadership style and philosophy and learn to apply their leadership skills to provide a positive impact upon their school culture and community.

 

SST5350 U.S. Government (Credit: ½)

This course focuses on the United States’ founding principles and beliefs. Students will study the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. The roles of political parties, lobbies and interest groups are included. All students are required to take Government for graduation.

 

SST5550 U.S. Government and Politics - AP (Credit: ½)

The AP Government and Politics: U.S. course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality. While there is no single approach that an AP Government and Politics: U.S. course must follow, certain topics are generally covered in college courses. The course will fulfill the Government requirement for graduation.

 

SST5305 U.S. History

This course emphasizes the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on the development of the Industrial United States and the emergence of modern America. There is also emphasis on the Great Depression and World War II. The course concludes with postwar United States into the contemporary United Stares. Students will explore the culture, economics, geography, governance and civics, history, and individuals, groups and interactions of each major period. Students will be administered an end-of-course exam which counts a percentage of the student’s grade. Students are required to take U.S. History for graduation.

 

 

SST5325 U.S. History - AP

Recommended Prerequisite: World Geography AP, World History AP, or European History AP

The AP program in U.S. History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format. Students will be administered an end-of-course exam which counts a percentage of the student’s grade. The course will fulfill the U.S. History requirement for graduation.

 

SST5306 U.S. History - Honors

This is a more in-depth study of the standard U.S. History course. The course emphasizes the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on the development of the Industrial United States and the emergence of modern America. There is also emphasis on the Great Depression and World War II. The course concludes with postwar United States into the contemporary United States. Students will explore the culture, economics, geography, governance and civics, history, and individuals, groups and interactions of each major period. Students will be administered an end-of-course exam which counts a percentage of the student’s grade. The course will fulfill the U.S. History requirement for graduation.

 

SST5671 World Geography

Students study people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international levels from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. (SST5673 World Geography - Sheltered)

 

SST5672 World Geography - Honors

This course is designed especially for ninth graders who want to pursue the AP curriculum in 11th and 12th grades. In World Geography students study people, places and environments at local, regional, national and international levels from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography.

 

SST5675 World Geography - AP

This course is designed especially for ninth graders who want to pursue the AP curriculum in eleventh and twelfth grades. The purpose of the AP course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. On successful completion of the course, the student should be able to: use and think about maps and spatial data, understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places, recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes, define regions and evaluate the regionalization process, and characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places. The course will fulfill the World Geography requirement for graduation.

SST5510 World History

This course is a comprehensive study of World History, which includes the broad history of human-kind, with a more concentrated focus from the Renaissance to pre-sent day. Students are introduced to cultural, economic, political and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. Students are required to take World Geography or World History. A. P. counterparts including European History AP comply with state requirements. Ancient History coupled with Modern History also satisfies the requirement.

 

SST5513 World History - Honors

This is a more intensive approach to the standard World History course. It is a comprehensive study of World History, which includes the broad history of humankind, with a more concentrated focus from the Renaissance to present day. The course introduces students to cultural, economic, political and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. This study provides a context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. The course will fulfill the World History requirement for graduation.

 

SST5515 World History- Honors (World Studies)

Arranged in a two-hour team-teaching block, this course integrates the study of world history and literature correlating historical periods and events with literary trends and writings of comparable periods. (Note: One credit is earned for English II Honors and one credit for World History Honors.) This course encompasses a correlated study of reading, language development, literature, composition, listening, and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking, and World History. The course will fulfill the World History requirement for graduation.

 

SST5517 World History - AP

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frame-works and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. The course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and techno-logical precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity throughout the course. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along with the consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study. The course will fulfill the World History requirement for graduation.

 

 

 

 

Special Education

The following courses are designed for students who need to master basic skills and to assist students in meeting the goals of their IEP. These courses do not follow the general education MNPS Standards and are not college preparatory.

V1L9525 Career and Technical Education I – Skill Based

This course introduces students to a variety of functional work jobs designed to assess their technical aptitude and interests.

 

V2L9525 Career and Technical Education II – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Career and Technical Education I with a focus on community based training experiences and the expansion of independent work routines.

 

V3L9525 Career and Technical Education III – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Career and Technical Education II with a focus on a vocational program that correlates with the student’s area of aptitude and interests.

 

V4L9525 Career and Technical Education IV – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Career and Technical Education III with the focus on the development of skills in one or two identified career areas and participation in a community based training program and the development of independent problem solving skills.

R1L9525 Reading I –Skill Based

This course focuses on identifying functional pictures, signs, international symbols and basic sight words in the school and community.

 

R2L9525 Reading II – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Reading I with emphasis on functional academics and job-related vocabulary.

 

R3L9525 Reading III – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Reading II with emphasis on vocabulary for career development and participation in the community.

 

R4L9525 Reading IV – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Reading III with emphasis on reading for career development, community access and leisure.

M1L9525 Math I – Skill Based

This course focuses on the development of functional math skills including matching, sorting, categorizing by various attributes, and number concepts.

 

M2L9525 Math II – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Math I and expands the focus to include counting, ordering, sequencing, number identification and beginning money skills.

 

 

M3L9525 Math III – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Math II with the focus on functional use of numbers, money and time management.

 

M4L9525 Math IV – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Math III with the focus on career aptitude, vocational placement and independent living skills.

C1L9525 Science I – Skill Based

This course focuses on the functional awareness and use of the properties of heat, cold, sound, light, weather safety and living things in the environment.

 

C2L9525 Science II – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Science I with an emphasis on safety and problem solving using property and matter in the environment.

 

C3L9525 Science III – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Science II with an emphasis on the development of safety as it applies to vocational training and areas of career interests.

 

C4L9525 Science IV – Skill Based

This course is a continuation of Science III with an emphasis on the development of safety and survival skills needed for career placement and independent living.

S1L9525 Social Studies I - Skill Based

This course focuses on the use of the environment and services in the school, local community and city.

 

S2L9525 Social Studies II – Skill Based

This is a continuation of Social Studies I with an expanding focus on transportation, laws and individual rights.

 

S3L9525 Social Studies III – Skill Based

This is a continuation of Social Studies II with a focus on public transportation, personal rights and safety, and functional community services as they apply to vocational training and career exploration.

 

S4L9525 Social Studies IV – Skill Based

This is a continuation of Social Studies III with a focus on career placement and independent living skills.

Foundation courses are based on the MNPS District Academic Standards and are designed to ensure students who receive special education services are taught a parallel and viable curriculum that will prepare them to earn a regular high school diploma. Students in these classes often need additional assistance in meeting the goals of their IEP that may not be available in a general classroom setting.

 

E19525 English I - Foundation

English I – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or design that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. This course encompasses a correlated study of reading, language development, literature, composition, listening and speaking based upon the adopted District Academic Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening. Students will be administered the TCAP English I End-of-Course Performance Indicators.

 

E29525 English II - Foundation

This is a continuation of the English I-Foundation course. Students will be administered the tests on the TCAP English II Gateway.

 

E39525 English III - Foundation

This is a continuation of the English II-Foundation course. Students will be administered the TCAP Writing Assessment.

 

E49525 English IV - Foundation

This is a continuation of the English III-Foundation course.

 

M69525 Algebra I - Foundation

Algebra I – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or de-sign that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. Algebra I develops mathematical concepts through the following strands: number sense and number theory; estimation, measurement and computation; patterns, functions and algebraic thinking; statistics and probability; and spatial sense and geometric concepts. This course incorporates the process standards of representation, communication, problem solving, reasoning and proof, and connections to address the Gate-way Mathematics indicators. Appropriate technology and manipulatives are used to develop and ex-tend algebraic thinking and to en-gage student reasoning. Other concepts include analysis of "families of functions," solving systems of equations, graphing and data analysis. Algebra I provides the fundamentals necessary for the further study of mathematics. Stu-dents will take the Gateway Mathematics test upon completion of this course.

M79525 Geometry - Foundation

Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I

Geometry – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or de-sign that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. This course develops the concepts of plane, solid and coordinate geometry. Proofs, both deductive and inductive, are used to develop these concepts, and to develop logical thought and reasoning processes.

 

M59525 Math Foundations II – Foundation

Math Foundation II – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the con-tent, methodology, delivery and/or design that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. Math Foundations II develops the topics of rational numbers, number properties, order of operations, inverse operations, operations with integers, functions, graphs, measurement and computation, patterns, algebraic expressions and solving equations, statistics and probability, geometric properties and relationships and problem-solving strategies with a theme of Thinking Algebraically. Concrete strategies and geometric models of mathematical concepts will be emphasized. Students may not earn credit in both ELL Math Foundations II and Foundations II. Upon completion of the course, students must take the State-mandated End-of-Course test.

 

 

 

LS19525 Learning Strategies I

LS29525 Learning Strategies II

LS39525 Learning Strategies III

LS49525 Learning Strategies IV

This focus of Learning Strategies I is to assist students to be successful in the general education classes by reinforcing study skills, developing compensatory skills, and providing academic support services.

 

X19525 Out-of-School Experience I

X29525 Out-of-School Experience II

X39525 Out-of-School Experience III

X49525 Out-of-School Experience IV

The student is assigned to a work/career site under the supervision of his/her teacher during school hours. The student must have specific goals to focus on during this experience.

 

C79525 Biology I - Foundation

Biology I – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or design that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. Biology is a course that introduces students to the world of living things. Stu-dents will experience the content through inquiry. Using available technology, students will investigate the world around them. The six Gateway Biology standards are: cells, interactions, photosynthesis and respiration, genetic and bio-technology, diversity and biological evaluation. Credit cannot be awarded for both Biology I and Honors Biology I. Students will be administered the Biology Gateway at the conclusion of this course.

 

C59525 Ecology - Foundation

Recommended Prerequisite: Biology I and Physical Science

Special Education Ecology – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or design that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. Stu-dents will study the many living and non-living cycles in nature, ecological populations and communities, nutritional relationships in nature, food webs and pyramids, ecological succession and the natural changes that take place over a period of time in any eco-system. Concepts from Biology I and Chemistry I will be applied. Many labs and field experiences are included to assist students in learning the science content, as well as addressing the challenges facing our world – pollution, extinct species, abuse of natural resources and overpopulation.

C69525 Physical Science - Foundation

Physical Science – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or design that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. Students will study introductory chemistry and physics. This course covers fundamental concepts such as: force, motion, interactions of matter, energy, structure and properties of matter. Students learn the relationships between science and technology, and how science affects all life. Hands-on laboratory investigations, individual studies and group activities should constitute a major portion of the learning experience. Conservation of matter and energy is an underlying theme throughout the course. Physical Science will provide the knowledge, prerequisite skills and habits of mind needed for problem solving and ethical decision-making about matters of scientific and technological concern. Students will be administered the Physical Science End-of-Course Test at the conclusion of this course

SS9525 U.S. History - Foundation

U.S. History – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or design that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. This course emphasizes the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on the development of the Industrial United States and the emergence of modern America. There is also emphasis on the Great Depression and World War II. The course concludes with postwar United States into the contemporary United States. Students will explore the culture, economics, geography, governance and civics, history, and individuals, groups and interactions of each major period. Students will be administered an end-of-course exam which counts a percentage of the student’s grade. Students are required to take U.S. History for graduation.

 

S89525 World Geography - Foundation

World Geography – Foundation is a specially designed course with appropriate adaptation to the content, methodology, delivery and/or design that address the student’s unique needs that result from a disability. In World Geography High School, students study people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international levels from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography.

Visual/Performing Arts

 

ART2515 Art History AP

This course will follow the guide-lines of the College Board AP Art History course, which have the following objectives: the students will develop understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms within historical and cultural contexts; the students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures; and the students will learn to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to analyze what they see.

 

ART2514 Art Studio/Production - AP

Recommended Prerequisite: Visual Arts I

This course will follow the guide-lines of the College Board AP Studio Art course, which offers opportunities for developing one of three specific portfolios: drawing, two-D design, or 3-D design. This course is only for students who are capable of producing a portfolio of works in various media in addition to a series of works demonstrating an in-depth personal commitment to a particular artistic concern

 

ART2510 Ceramic Construction and Sculpture (Credit: ½)

Recommended Prerequisite: Visual Arts I

This is an in-depth studio course in which the student explores the plastic medium of fire clay. Throwing functional objects on the wheel, coil and slab building, and expressive ceramic sculpture are options available to students. The focus is on discovering the unique properties of clay, glaze and/or the process of firing the ceramic kiln.

 

 

 

ART2504 Exploring Printmaking (Credit: ½)

Recommended Prerequisite: Visual Arts I

This is an in-depth studio course in which the student explores print-making processes such as: linoleum, plexiglass, intaglio, serigraph and wood cut. The focus is on the fine art of printmaking, rather than logos or collographic images.

 

ART2512 Expressive Palette: Painting

Recommended Prerequisite: Visual Arts I

This course is an in-depth studio course in which the student explores qualities of painting including acrylic and watercolor, and studies color theory. The student can choose to focus on the human figure, land or seascapes, still life or fantasy.

 

ART2508 Fibers and Dyes: Weaving and Batik (Credit: ½)

Recommended Prerequisite: Visual Arts I

This is an in-depth studio course in which the student explores weaving with a variety of looms and/or the batik process of staining fibers to create aesthetic craft objects of function or decoration. The study of cultural and historic factors is included.

 

ART2820 Jewelry/Metalsmithing

Recommended Prerequisite: Visual Arts I

This is a studio course in which the students explore the unique properties of metals. Students will concentrate on, but will not be limited to, jewelry techniques such as soldering, casting, filing, buffing and polishing.

 

ART2513 Learning to Look: Art Criticism/Appreciation (Credit: ½)

This is an in-depth course that focuses on a few of the world's greatest works of art and architecture. Describing, analyzing and synthesizing the content and meaning to discover why these works have been identified as great is the goal. Emphasis is on communicating discoveries and personal judgment rationales verbally and in writing. It also involves recognizing the accomplishments of human effect in the visual arts and appreciating the accomplishments of artists in major world cultures.

 

ART2502 Sculpture: Relief and in the Round (Credit: ½)

Recommended Prerequisite: Visual Arts I

This is an in-depth studio course in which the student explores creating expressive forms from wood, plaster, plastic or metal. Approaches in direct carving, casting and additive construction are options open to the student.

 

ART2100 Visual Arts I

This elective course offers students studio experiences in drawing, painting, and two- and three-dimensional design with an emphasis on art elements. It incorporates the National Standards for Art Education: understanding and applying media, techniques and processes; using knowledge of structures and functions; choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas; understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures; reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others; and making connections between visual arts and other disciplines.

 

MUS2130 Beginning Band

This course is designed for those students who wish to learn to play a wind or percussion instrument and have had no previous instrumental instruction or have not had enough instrumental experience to qualify for Marching Band I or Concert Band I. After school and/or evening performances may be required.

 

MUS2129 Chamber Choir I (Madrigal Singers)

Recommended Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

MUS2229 Chamber Choir II (Madrigal Singers)

MUS2329 Chamber Choir III (Madrigal Singers)

MUS2429 Chamber Choir IV (Madrigal Singers)

This course gives the advanced singer an opportunity to perform unaccompanied literature written predominantly in the 16th and 17th centuries that has a complex poly-phonic nature. The literature to be studied was specifically written for madrigal groups. After school and/or evening performances will be required.

 

MUS2151 Class Guitar I

This course is designed for the beginning student wishing to learn the basic fundamentals of guitar playing. Through the use of first position chords, the student will be able to accompany himself with folk songs and melodies. Students will need their own guitars for practice. This course also incorporates elements of music theory and music history. After school and/or evening performances may be required for this course.

 

MUS2251 Class Guitar II

Recommended Prerequisite: Class Guitar I

This course is designed for the student wishing in-depth study in reading and the pluctrum (with pick) approach to playing. Some emphasis will be placed on further development of the bar chords. Students will need their own guitars for practice at home. This course also incorporates elements of music theory and music history. After school and/or evening performances may be required for this course.

 

MUS3597 Eurythmics I-Spring Semester (Credit: ½)

Recommended Prerequisite: Color Guard in Marching Band during fall semester

This course is designed for those students who were color guard members in marching band and wish to continue their training during the second semester. It blends music with dance and equipment handling (flags, color guard rifles, color guard sabers, and other manipulatives). The dance elements will include but are not exclusive to jazz, modern, and ballet. A variety of musical genres will be used to broaden the knowledge of music and its use in creating movement. There may be performance and/or competition required for this course after school hours.

 

MUS2171 General Music I

This is a course in the basic understanding of the development of music with emphasis on style, form, history and repertoire, from the 1800’s to the present.

 

MUS2271 General Music II

Recommended Prerequisite: General Music I

This course is a continuation of General Music I and goes into more historical depth starting with 1200 A.D. to the present

 

MUS2158 Instrumental Techniques I

MUS2258 Instrumental Techniques II

MUS2358 Instrumental Techniques III

MUS2458 Instrumental Techniques IV

This course is to provide small groups of students with development in technique on a particular instrument. All band and orchestra instruments, including piano and guitar are taught. Repertory and technical studies will be adapted to the capabilities of the student.

 

MUS2131 Marching Band I (Credit: ½)

MUS2231 Marching Band II (Credit: ½)

MUS2331 Marching Band III (Credit: ½)

MUS2431 Marching Band IV (Credit: ½)

This course is designed to prepare quality music and place it in a setting of movement to music. Emphasis will be placed on technique and musicality. After school and/or evening rehearsals and performances will be required.

 

MUS2125 Mixed Chorus I

MUS2225 Mixed Chorus II

MUS2325 Mixed Chorus III

MUS2425 Mixed Chorus IV

This is a course designed to give students an opportunity to perform a wide variety of three-part and four-part songs. Emphasis is placed on vocal and choral development. After school and/or evening rehearsals and performances may be required.

 

MUS2175 Music Theory I

This is a beginning course that includes the study of the elements of music: notation, harmony, key relationships and chord patterns. Classes are taught through the use of the electronic piano lab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MUS2715 Pop Ensemble I

MUS2716 Pop Ensemble II

MUS2717 Pop Ensemble III

MUS2718 Pop Ensemble IV

Recommended Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

This course is for the student who has had prior instrumental or vocal training. It is designed for those students who have an interest in performing in the pop music genre. Music theory and music history, as well as improvisation will be covered in this course. After school and/or evening rehearsals and performances may be required.

 

MUS2135 Wind Ensemble I (Credit: ½)

Recommended Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

MUS2235 Wind Ensemble II (Credit: ½)

MUS2335 Wind Ensemble III (Credit: ½)

MUS2435 Wind Ensemble IV (Credit: ½)

This course is for a highly select group of advanced wind and percussion musicians that study and perform the best of music written or arranged for wind ensembles and concert bands. In addition to improving playing and performance skills, the student will be required to study historical, multicultural and interdisciplinary perspectives as it relates to music, as well as form and style. Music theory will be incorporated into daily lessons and will be tested in a written and performance format. This is a performance-based course and will require students to participate in after school and/or evening rehearsals and performances may be required. An audition for this course may be required.

 

MUS2121 Women’s Choral I

MUS2221 Women’s Choral II

MUS2321 Women’s Choral III

MUS2421 Women’s Choral IV

The emphasis is placed on voice development, music reading, ear training and sight singing. The literature studied is written for female voices in Soprano I, Soprano II, Alto and other variations suitable for the developing female voice. This course may require after school and/or evening performances.

 

PAR2726 Dance Ensemble I

Recommended Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation

PAR2727 Dance Ensemble II

PAR2728 Dance Ensemble III

PAR2729 Dance Ensemble IV

The course is designed so advanced dance students learn faculty-choreographed pieces to be

performed in concert. In addition, the students have the opportunity to choreograph using dances in the class. Participation in rehearsals and performances outside the school day is required.

 

PAR2120 Dance Technique I

The initial techniques and theoretical concepts of modern and jazz dance are explored. The study includes proper body alignment, and the mechanics of breathing and phrasing. Verbal and movement vocabulary are also analyzed. After school and/or evening rehearsals and performances may be required.

 

PAR2220 Dance Technique II

Recommended Prerequisite: Dance Technique I or Teacher Recommendation

The further development of jazz dance techniques is pursued. A second style of dance is introduced and is to be chosen from the following: ballet, ethnic or tap. After school and/or evening rehearsals and performances may be required.

 

PAR2320 Dance Technique III

Recommended Prerequisite: Dance Technique II or Teacher Recommendation

This course is an in-depth study of the two techniques learned previously in Dance Techniques I and II. A third style of dance is introduced from the following: ballet, ethnic or modern. After school and/or evening rehearsals and performances may be required.

 

PAR2420 Dance Technique IV

Recommended Prerequisite: Dance Technique III or Teacher Recommendation

Advanced modern and jazz techniques are studied with an emphasis on style and phrasing movement. Intermediate tap technique is included. After school and/or evening rehearsals and performances may be required.

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