10th ELA

10th Grade World Literature

https://www.troup.k12.ga.us/612resources/Content2/10th-literature

World Literature GA Standards - https://www.georgiastandards.org/Georgia-Standards/Frameworks/ELA-World-Literature-Guidance.pdf

World LIterature - https://www.polk.k12.ga.us/olc/906/class/177755

https://www.dekalbschoolsga.org/documents/curriculum/print/ela-world-literature-unit-1.pdf

http://www.gavirtuallearning.org/Resources/Shared10thLitComp.aspx

https://sites.google.com/site/ahsritaflowers/10th-grade-literature-composition

 

Julius Caesar

worksheet - http://www.mpsaz.org/rmhs/staff/clandreadis/pertinent_documents/files/julius_caesar_worksheet_act_1_1.pdf

Unit packet - https://www.ntschools.org/cms/lib/NY19000908/Centricity/Domain/684/Julius%20Caesar.pdf

Teacher's pack http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/shakespeare/pdfs/ShakespeareJuliusCaesar.pdf

https://www.cusd80.com/cms/lib6/AZ01001175/Centricity/Domain/6149/Julius%20Caesar%202014.pdf

https://sites.google.com/a/salem.k12.va.us/amoore/english-10/julius-caesar

 

 

The Pearl Discussion Q's

The Pearl Discussion Qs

  1. Why can neither Kino nor Juana protect their baby from the scorpion?

    2. Why could Kino kill the doctor more easily than talk to him?

    3. Why is it important to Juana that Kino be the one to throw the pearl back into the sea?

    4. Why does Kino think the killing of a man is not as evil as the killing of a boat?

    5. What does the narrator mean when he says, "A town is a thing like a colonial animal" (p. 21)?

    6. Why does the music of the pearl change?

    7. Why does Kino come to feel that he will lose his soul if he gives up the pearl?

    8. Why does Tomás help Kino?

    9. Why does Juana feel the events following the pearl's discovery may all have been an illusion?

    10. What is the significance of Juana and Kino's walking side by side when they return to the town?

 

11. Did Kino do the right thing in demanding a fair price for the pearl, even if it meant leaving his community?

12. Why does Steinbeck choose the parable as the form for this story?

The Pearl Vocab

  • Ceaseless - (adjective) without stop or pause; unending; incessant.
  • Covey
  • Chittered
  • Dank
  • Blustered
  • Interval
  • Pulque
  • Crevices
  • lymphatic
  • strenuous
  • alms
  • indigent
  • scurrying
  • estuary
  • mirage
  • vagueness
  • bulwark
  • poultice
  • undulating
  • obscured
  • scuttling
  • perceptible
  • deliberately
  • speculatively
  • reluctant
  • illusion
  • deftly
  • writhed
  • incandescence
  • instinctively
  • shrilly
  • semblance
  • patron
  • distillate
  • disparagement
  • marvel
  • transfigured
  • reluctant
  • solemnly
  • suspiciously
  • curtly
  • pitting
  • gelatine
  • clamored
  • taut
  • consecrated
  • crooning
  • brooding
  • cozened
  • Lucene
  • Tithe
  • countenanced
  • Raggedness
  • Crevices
  • Self-consciousness
  • Ramparts
  • Stalwart
  • Procession
  • Inferior
  • Benign
  • Ceremonious
  • Clambered
  • Perplexed
  • Contrary
  • Collusion
  • Comparative
  • Coagulating
  • Monstrosity
  • Lethargy
  • Exhilaration
  • Edifice
  • Monolithic
  • Foliage
  • Petulant
  • cicada

The Pearl

 

The Pearl Essay Topics

Have you ever received or accomplished something you thought would be great but turned out not so good? Write a narrative explaining what happened.

Write about an experience that taught you something about money.

What family or cultural traditions have shaped your attitudes or beliefs about money, family, and education?

End of Chapter 1: Have you ever been angry enough to punch a steel gate? Describe what made you so mad. (narrative or cause and effect essay)

End of Chapter 2: What is the role of money in your life? Does/would it solve your problems? Can it bring happiness? What negatives and positives come with instant wealth? (persuasive essay)

End of Chapter 3: What are your plans for the future? How do you plan to accomplish them? (informative essay)

End of Chapter 4: Have you ever felt everyone and everything was against you. How did you overcome it? (narrative essay)

 

The Pearl – Literary Devices

  • Personification - The town itself takes on a life of its own. Instruct students to describe their home town, giving it human characteristics.
  • Plot - Make a chronology chart and analyze cause and effect as a chain of events. Discuss if and how the tragedy could have been avoided.

The Pearl Study Guide

 

The Pearl Study Guide

Chapter One

  • What is the song of the family?
  • What is the Song of Evil?
  • What does Kino kill?
  • How does Juana help baby Coyotito when he is stung?
  • Why won’t the doctor come to them?
  • Why is Kino timid in approaching the doctors house?
  • Why wouldn’t the doctor see him?

 

Chapter Two

  • What is the one thing of value Kino owned in the world?
  • “She had not prayed directly for the recovery of the baby – she had prayed that they might find a pearl with which to hire the doctor to cure the baby.”
  • Kino finds the pearl! He can’t contain his excitement!

 

Chapter Three

  • News spreads all over town that Kino had found the “Pearl of the World!”
  • When everyone knew, including the doctor, the doctor started saying, ‘He is a client of mine. I am treating his child for a scorpion sting.”
  • Then, all of a sudden, people referred to Juana as a beautiful kind girl even though she was a hard-faced woman.
  • Now, jealousy and envy reared its head throughout town. People started hating Kino and Juana. They had no idea. They thought “everyone share their joy.”
  • Kino’s brother asks him what he wants to do know that he’s found the pearl and he’s a rich man. He says he wants to properly marry Juana (now that he can pay). He envisions their clothing (even shoes)!
  • “Kino’s future was real, but having set it up, other forces were set up to destroy it, and this he knew, so that he had to prepare to meet the attack.” How is this similar to Jesus?
  • The doctor comes to see the baby (once he hears word that they will be rich) and says the poison will strike within the hour. He gives the baby some medicine and basically scares Kino and Juana to death.
  • The doctor wants to be paid and acts surprised when Kino says he’s found a pearl.
  • He hides the pearl and re-hides it. Juana asks who Kino fears and he says, “everyone.”
  • Someone is in the house! Or so Kino thinks
  • Juana says “This thing is evil! This pearl is like a sin! It will destroy us

 

Chapter Four

He’s walking through town to sell the pearl. A procession forms. He feels cheated by the low offers made by the buyers.

His brother, Juan Tomas says, “Go with God.”

 

That night, Kino hears something outside. He goes outside with his knife and Juana finds him barely conscious with a large cut from ear to chin. He doesn’t know who cut him.

 

Chapter Five

Kino awakens to see Juana sneaking out of the house to throw the pearl into the sea. He is furious and catches her mid-throw.

Men are attacking Kino and rummaging through his pockets. He kills a man. Juana finds the pearl that was thrown from Kino’s pocket during the struggle.

He tries to escape with his canoe but someone has cut a hole in it.

Someone has destroyed their home. How?

His brother agrees to hide them. Kino doesn’t want to bring danger to his brother and his family.

His brother reminds him once again to Go with God.

 

Chapter Six

Trackers are on their trail. They wander through the woods, along the trail and water and rest in a cave. The trackers come back that night. Two are sleeping and one is on watch when Kino spots them.

What happened to baby Coyotito?

Kino and Juana returned to the town, tattered, worn out and emotionally unattached

What did Kino do with the pearl?

 

Vocabulary Words (10 total on test) - Matching

Ceaseless                                            Covey                                                   Chittered

Dank                                                      Blustered                                            Interval

Pulque                                                  Crevices                                               lymphatic           

Strenuous                                           alms                                                       indigent

Scurrying                                             estuary                                                 mirage

Vagueness                                          bulwark                                                poultice

Undulating                                          obscured                                             Scuttling                              

Perceptible                                         deliberately

 

Setting

Plot

Author/date

Theme

Main characters