Fluency

What is fluency? 

Fluency is the ability to read a text not only quickly, but also accurately. Fluency is a very important aspect for a student to be able to fully achieve both word recognition and reading comprehension. You may be wondering why fluency is so important, well here is why!! Less fluent readers focus on decoding words in the text and by the end of the text lose their ability to focus their attention on comprehending what the text meant. It is immensely important for readers to be fluent so they are able to apply their full attention on the meaning of the text!

Armbruster, Bonnie B., et al. Putting Reading First: the Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read: Kindergarten through Grade 3. National Institute for Literacy, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, U.S. Dept. of Education, 2003. |

What does research say about fluency?

Researchers have found two instructional approaches that relate to fluency. The first approach is repeated oral and monitored reading. This approach consists of the student reading passages aloud, several times, and then receiving feedback and guidance about their reading from the teacher. While studying this approach, researchers found students become overall better readers, improve their reading speed, accuracy, word recognition, and fluency. The second approach is independent silent reading. This approach consists of a teacher encouraging and providing instructional time for the student to independently read texts. Unfortunate, researchers have not been able to confirm that silent reading improves reading achievement and fluency nor have they confirmed that independent reading cannot improve reading achievement or fluency. Fluency is an important ability a child MUST have to fully achieve reading comprehension! 

Armbruster, Bonnie B., et al. Putting Reading First: the Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read: Kindergarten through Grade 3. National Institute for Literacy, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, U.S. Dept. of Education, 2003. |

What strategies can I use to strengthen a child's fluency skills?

  1. Model fluent reading for the child 
    • Read aloud daily for your students. This strategy allows a student to see what reading effortlessly and with expression sounds like. After modeling fluent reading with a child, allow the child to reread the passage four times to help improve fluency skills. 
  2. Have the children read repeatedly and offer guidance
    • The best way to improve fluency is for a child to reread a passage orally, several times. 
  3. Provide text that is appropriate for the child 
    • In order for fluency to improve, a child MUST read text that is below their instruction reading level!!! The text they are reading orally should be easy for them to read so they are able to accurately and quickly decode words. If not, children will become uninterested and frustrated with the text which will not lead to fluency.

Armbruster, Bonnie B., et al. Putting Reading First: the Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read: Kindergarten through Grade 3. National Institute for Literacy, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, U.S. Dept. of Education, 2003. |

Below is a video of an instructional interactive video created by GoNoodle to use with your child to strengthen their fluency skills!!! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjtPMiumixA

  • Throughout my time in school districts, I have found children enjoy being active in the classroom and really enjoy catchy phrases they can sing along to. I found this video on Go Noodle and thought it could help not only younger students, but also older students!