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US History by Mr. Harris

U. S. History Honors

 

Curriculum Guide

Northampton County High School – East

 

 

Mr. Harris

 

 

Grade 11

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

The study of United States History Honors in high school builds on historical and geographical perspectives gained from the elementary and middle level study of North Carolina and the United States. The study of World History in grade nine will now enable students to place the United States in a world context as well. The economic and political perspectives and historical foundations gained from the study of Civics and Economics Honors will prepare students for the examination of our nation’s history. In order to include the perspectives of the twenty-first century, the study of United States History Honors will begin with the Federalist Period and continue through the changes in America following the terrorist attack on September 11th. In North Carolina, the study of history no longer supports memorization of unexamined and isolated facts but emphasizes the thinking skills to detect trends, analyze movements and events, and develop a “sense of history”.

 

The United States History Honors provides the opportunity for advanced work, rigorous academic study, and the practical application of the major ideas and concepts found in the study of American history. The course is challenging and requires students to take greater responsibility for their learning by participating in problem-seeking and problem-solving, scholarly and creative processes, critical analysis and application, reflective thinking, and the expression and defense of ideas generated through the study of the content. United States History Honors follows the same course of study as the corresponding standard United States History course; however the material is taught with greater complexity, novelty, acceleration, and reflects a differentiated curriculum. United States History Honors is distinguished by a difference in the quality of the work expected, not merely an increase in quantity.

 

 

ELEVENTH GRADE UNITED STATES HISTORY HONORS NC SCOS

 

 

Competency Goal 1

The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.

 

Objectives

1.01 Identify the major domestic issues and conflicts experienced by the nation during the Federalist Period.

1.02 Analyze the political freedoms available to the following groups prior to 1820: women, wage earners, landless farmers, American Indians, African Americans, and other ethnic groups.

1.03 Assess commercial and diplomatic relationships with Britain, France, and other nations.

Competency Goal 2

Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.

 

 

Objectives

2.01 Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the Union.

2.02 Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.

2.03 Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.

2.04 Assess political events, issues, and personalities that contributed to sectionalism and nationalism.

2.05 Identify the major reform movements and evaluate their effectiveness.

2.06 Evaluate the role of religion in the debate over slavery and other social movements and issues.

Competency Goal 3

Crisis, Civil War, and Reconstruction (1848-1877) - The learner will analyze the issues that led to the Civil War, the effects of the war, and the impact of Reconstruction on the nation.

 

 

Objectives

3.01 Trace the economic, social, and political events from the Mexican War to the outbreak of the Civil War.

3.02 Analyze and assess the causes of the Civil War.

3.03 Identify political and military turning points of the Civil War and assess their significance to the outcome of the conflict.

3.04 Analyze the political, economic, and social impact of Reconstruction on the nation and identify the reasons why Reconstruction came to an end.

3.05 Evaluate the degree to which the Civil War and Reconstruction proved to be a test of the supremacy of the national government.

Competency Goal 4

The Great West and the Rise of the Debtor (1860s-1896) - The learner will evaluate the great westward movement and assess the impact of the agricultural revolution on the nation.

 

Objectives

4.01 Compare and contrast the different groups of people who migrated to the West and describe the problems they experienced.

4.02 Evaluate the impact that settlement in the West had upon different groups of people and the environment.

4.03 Describe the causes and effects of the financial difficulties that plagued the American farmer and trace the rise and decline of Populism.

4.04 Describe innovations in agricultural technology and business practices and assess their impact on the West.

Competency Goal 5

Becoming an Industrial Society (1877-1900) - The learner will describe innovations in technology and business practices and assess their impact on economic, political, and social life in America.

 

Objectives

5.01 Evaluate the influence of immigration and rapid industrialization on urban life.

5.02 Explain how business and industrial leaders accumulated wealth and wielded political and economic power.

5.03 Assess the impact of labor unions on industry and the lives of workers.

5.04 Describe the changing role of government in economic and political affairs.

Competency Goal 6

The emergence of the United States in World Affairs (1890-1914) - The learner will analyze causes and effects of the United States emergence as a world power.

 

Objectives

6.01 Examine the factors that led to the United States taking an increasingly active role in world affairs.

6.02 Identify the areas of United States military, economic, and political involvement and influence.

6.03 Describe how the policies and actions of the United States government impacted the affairs of other countries.

Competency Goal 7

The Progressive Movement in the United States (1890-1914) - The learner will analyze the economic, political, and social reforms of the Progressive Period.

 

Objectives

7.01 Explain the conditions that led to the rise of Progressivism.

7.02 Analyze how different groups of Americans made economic and political gains in the Progressive Period.

7.03 Evaluate the effects of racial segregation on different regions and segments of the United States' society.

7.04 Examine the impact of technological changes on economic, social, and cultural life in the United States.

Competency Goal 8

The Great War and Its Aftermath (1914-1930) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War I and the war's influence on international affairs during the 1920's.

 

Objectives

8.01 Examine the reasons why the United States remained neutral at the beginning of World War I but later became involved.

8.02 Identify political and military turning points of the war and determine their significance to the outcome of the conflict.

8.03 Assess the political, economic, social, and cultural effects of the war on the United States and other nations.

Competency Goal 9

Prosperity and Depression (1919-1939) - The learner will appraise the economic, social, and political changes of the decades of "The Twenties" and "The Thirties."

 

Objectives

9.01 Elaborate on the cycle of economic boom and bust in the 1920's and 1930's.

9.02 Analyze the extent of prosperity for different segments of society during this period.

9.03 Analyze the significance of social, intellectual, and technological changes of lifestyles in the United States.

9.04 Describe challenges to traditional practices in religion, race, and gender.

9.05 Assess the impact of New Deal reforms in enlarging the role of the federal government in American life.

Competency Goal 10

World War II and the Beginning of the Cold War (1930s-1963) - The learner will analyze United States involvement in World War II and the war's influence on international affairs in following decades.

 

Objectives

10.01 Elaborate on the causes of World War II and reasons for United States entry into the war.

10.02 Identify military, political, and diplomatic turning points of the war and determine their significance to the outcome and aftermath of the conflict.

10.03 Describe and analyze the effects of the war on American economic, social, political, and cultural life.

10.04 Elaborate on changes in the direction of foreign policy related to the beginnings of the Cold War.

10.05 Assess the role of organizations established to maintain peace and examine their continuing effectiveness.

Competency Goal 11

Recovery, Prosperity, and Turmoil (1945-1980) - The learner will trace economic, political, and social developments and assess their significance for the lives of Americans during this time period.

 

Objectives

11.01 Describe the effects of the Cold War on economic, political, and social life in America.

11.02 Trace major events of the Civil Rights Movement and evaluate its impact.

11.03 Identify major social movements including, but not limited to, those involving women, young people, and the environment, and evaluate the impact of these movements on the United States' society.

11.04 Identify the causes of United States' involvement in Vietnam and examine how this involvement affected society.

11.05 Examine the impact of technological innovations that have impacted American life.

11.06 Identify political events and the actions and reactions of the government officials and citizens, and assess the social and political consequences.

Competency Goal 12

The United States since the Vietnam War (1973-present) - The learner will identify and analyze trends in domestic and foreign affairs of the United States during this time period.

 

Objectives

12.01 Summarize significant events in foreign policy since the Vietnam War.

12.02 Evaluate the impact of recent constitutional amendments, court rulings, and federal legislation on United States' citizens.

12.03 Identify and assess the impact of economic, technological, and environmental changes in the United States.

12.04 Identify and assess the impact of social, political, and cultural changes in the United States.

12.05 Assess the impact of growing racial and ethnic diversity in American society.

12.06 Assess the impact of twenty-first century terrorist activity on American society.

 

 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

 

Essential questions are the guiding questions that promote inquiry and deeper exploration of a subject and lead students to use the factual knowledge to draw conclusions and ultimately deduce the desired generalization. Because the goal of the essential questions is to get students to understand the generalizations, the two are related and questions are written to support the generalization.

 

Essential questions can be written on three levels: factual, conceptual, and provocative. During a lesson, teachers should use some of each type to engage students. Factual questions are written to cover the content and can be fixed in time and place. Because of this, factual questions can be written using proper nouns and past tense. For instance a unit on political action may cover the factual question “what strategies do lobbyists use to influence Congress?” Conceptual questions are timeless and universal and therefore are written more broadly. For instance a conceptual question for political action may be “What is the role of an active citizen?” Provocative questions are the highest level, have no right or wrong answer and are meant to encourage debate such as, “Should controversial or unpopular groups be excluded from political participation in a democracy?”

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS

 

  • The instructor requires students to read and/or interact to a wide spectrum of more challenging, thought provoking, relevant instructional materials including, but not limited to, multiple texts, primary sources and multimedia.
  • The instructor utilizes appropriate pacing.
  • The instructor requires evidence of higher level thinking from students.
  • The instructor uses appropriate technology.
  • The instructor encourages students to take greater responsibility and increase self-direction in their own learning.
  • The instructor includes opportunities for a variety of activities, such as panels, debates, reaction/reflection groups, scholarly dialogue, group investigations, and seminars.
  • The instructor requires students to engage in self-directed, advanced historical research.
  • The instructor provides multiple opportunities for real world and experiential learning opportunities.
  • The instructor requires students to develop and defend a position on a historical issue.

 

 

TIMETABLES AND DEADLINES

 

  • Problem-based collaborative investigation products must be submitted by the end of each nine-weeks grading period.
  • Independent and group investigation s are due at the end of each month.
  • Notebook checks, essays and miscellaneous projects are due every third week.

 

 

PACING GUIDE

 

 

Day 1

Pretest

Day 2

Federalist Era-Washington

Day 3

Adams

Day 4

Jefferson

Day 5

Early 1800’s Politics

Day 6

Sectionalism

Day 7

Jacksonian Age

Day 8

Era of Reform

Day 9

Mid-1800’s

Day 10

TEST 1

Day 11

Manifest Destiny

Day 12

Pre-Civil War Events

Day 13

Immediate Causes of Civil War

Day 14

Behind the War

Day 15

Civil War

Day 16

End of War

Day 17

Reconstruction

Day 18

Reconstruction

Day 19

Reconstruction Ends

Day 20

TEST 2

Day 21

Plains Indians

Day 22

Ranching / Mining

Day 23

Life on Plains

Day 24

Farmers and Populists

Day 25

Industrialization

Day 26

Big Business

Day 27

Labor Movement

Day 28

Urbanization

Day 29

Gilded Age Politics

Day 30

TEST 3

Day 31

Imperialism

Day 32

World Power

Day 33

Turn of the Century

Day 34

Discrimination

Day 35

Progressivism

Day 36

Progressive Reforms

Day 37

T. Roosevelt

Day 38

Taft / Election of 1912

Day 39

Wilson as a Progressive

Day 40

TEST 4

Day 41

REVIEW

Day 42

Mid-Term Exam

Day 43

World War I Begins

Day 44

US in WW I

Day 45

Fight for Peace

Day 46

Return to Normalcy

Day 47

Roaring 20’s

Day 48

20’s Culture

Day 49

TEST 5

Day 50

Start of Depression

Day 51

New Deal

Day 52

2nd New Deal

Day 53

Outbreak of WW II

Day 54

Holocaust

Day 55

US in WW II

Day 56

War in Europe

Day 57

War in the Pacific

Day 58

TEST 6

Day 59

Cold War Begins

Day 60

Truman and Cold War

Day 61

Eisenhower and the 50’s

Day 62

50’s Culture

Day 63

TEST 7

Day 64

Kennedy and the Cold War

Day 65

New Frontier

Day 66

Great Society

Day 67

Civil Rights Movement

Day 68

Civil Rights Movement

Day 69

Civil Rights Crisis

Day 70

Vietnam War

Day 71

Vietnam

Day 72

60’s Culture

Day 73

Nixon Presidency

Day 74

TEST 8

Day 75

Ford and Carter

Day 76

1980’s

Day 77

Modern America

Day 78

Test 9

Day 79

Review

Day 80

Review

Day 81

Review

Day 82

Review

Day 83

Review

Day 84

Review

Day 85

Review

Day 86

Review

Day 87

EOC / EXAM

Day 88

EOC / EXAM

Day 89

EOC / EXAM

Day 90

EOC / EXAM

 

 

ASSESSMENTS

 

  • There are multiple types of assessment, including formal and informal evaluation.
  • Assessment can be conducted by a variety of individuals, including self, peers, instructors and outside experts.

 

 

RUBRICS

 

US History Honors Writing Assessment Rubrics

 

Score 4 - This response shows understanding of the content, question, and/or problem. The response is insightful, integrates knowledge, and demonstrates powerful application.

  • The application shows powerful evidence of higher order thinking skills.
  • Concepts are accurate and well supported.
  • There are no misconceptions.
  • The response is comprehensive.

Score 3 - This response shows some understanding of the content, question, and/or problem. The response includes appropriate application that demonstrates evidence of higher order thinking skills.

  • The application shows some evidence of higher order thinking skills.
  • Concepts are accurate and supported.
  • There are no interfering misconceptions.
  • The response may not develop all parts equally.

Score 2 - This response shows knowledge of the content, question, and/or problem. The response is acceptable with some key ideas. The response shows little or no evidence of application.

  • The response includes some basic ideas.
  • The response provides little or no support.
  • There are minimal misconceptions.

Score 1 - This response shows minimal knowledge of the content, question, and/or problem. The response is related to the question, but it is inadequate.

  • The response includes incomplete or fragmented ideas or knowledge.
  • There may be significant misconceptions.

Score 0 - The response is completely incorrect or irrelevant. There may be no response.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US History Honors Oral Presentation Rubric

 

 

 

5

4

3

2

1

Argument:
addresses thesis, question complexity, source analysis, thoroughness of evidence

Thesis is well-developed and clearly focused; acknowledges the complexity of the question itself; confrontation and discussion of conflicting sources and information

Thesis must be consistent and controlled; may not be as focused as in top category

Limited or partially developed thesis which addressed question somewhat; more descriptive than analytic; may not discuss entire question

Confused, unsupported, poorly developed thesis; limited understanding of question; ineffective or inaccurate analysis

No thesis or an irrelevant one; inadequate or inaccurate understanding of question

Presentation:
quality of interaction with audience

Loud and clear, rehearsal evident, consistent eye contact, cooperative effort, good group communication, visuals are integrated and purposeful, answer audience questions with insight, exceeds requirements; effective style and tone, capitalizes on audience level of interest and knowledge

Loud and clear, rehearsed but may need polish in areas, eye contact, good visuals, answers most questions, everyone contributes but not necessarily equally; style and tone consistent with audience level of interest and knowledge

Some eye contact, meets minimum requirements, one leader/speaker (not a group effort), some parts are effective but not consistent, attempts audience questions; style and tone sometimes appropriate, sporadically acknowledges audience interest and knowledge

May read to class, lacking eye contact, speaking not always clear, mispronunciations, not cooperative effort, needs rehearsal, lacking visuals if required, not used if present; style and tone seldom appropriate, rarely acknowledges audience interest and knowledge

Haven't taken assignment seriously, joking or arguing with group, choppy lacking rehearsal and organization; mispronunciations, can't answer questions lacking eye contact, doesn't even meet minimum requirements; no awareness of audience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US History Honors Class Discussion Rubric

 

 

 

5

4

3

2

1

Quality of Comments

Timely and appropriate comments, thoughtful and reflective, responds respectfully to other student's remarks, provokes questions and comments from the group

Volunteers comments, most are appropriate and reflect some thoughtfulness, leads to other questions or remarks from student and/or others

Volunteers comments but lacks depth, may or may not lead to other questions from students

Struggles but participates, occasionally offers a comment when directly questioned, may simply restate questions or points previously raised, may add nothing new to the discussion or provoke no responses or question

Does not participate and/or only makes negative or disruptive remarks, comments are inappropriate or off topic

Resource/ Document Reference

Clear reference to text being discussed and connects to it to other text or reference points from previous readings and discussions

Has done the reading with some thoroughness, may lack some detail or critical insight

Has done the reading; lacks thoroughness of understanding or insight

Has not read the entire text and cannot sustain any reference to it in the course of discussion

Unable to refer to text for evidence or support of remarks

Active Listening

Posture, demeanor and behavior clearly demonstrate respect  and attentiveness to others

Listens to others most of the time, does not stay focused on other's comments (too busy formulating own) or loses continuity of discussion. Shows consistency in responding to the comments of others

Listens to others some of the time, does not stay focused on other's comments (too busy formulating own) or loses continuity of discussion. Shows some consistency in responding to the comments of others

Drifts in and out of discussion, listening to some remarks while clearly missing or ignoring others

Disrespectful of others when they are speaking; behavior indicates total non-involvement with group or discussion

 

 

US History Honors Cooperative Learning Rubric

 

 

 

5

4

3

2

1

Works toward the achievement of group goals

Actively and consistently understands and works toward group goals

Consistently understands and works toward group goals

Consistently understands and sporadically works towards group goals

Sporadically understands and works toward group goals

Rarely, if ever, understands and works toward group goals

Demonstrates effective interpersonal skills

Actively and consistently helps promote effective group interaction and expresses ideas and opinions in ways that are sensitive to the feelings or knowledge base of others

Consistently participates in group interaction without prompting and expresses ideas and opinions in ways that are sensitive to the feelings and knowledge base of others

Consistently participates and sporadically expresses ideas and opinions in ways that are sensitive to the feelings and knowledge base of others

Sporadically participates in group interaction without prompting and sporadically expresses ideas and opinions in ways that are sensitive to the feelings and knowledge base of others

Rarely, if ever, participates in group interaction without prompting and expresses ideas and opinions in ways that are sensitive to the feelings and knowledge base of others

Contributes to group maintenance

Actively and consistently helps the group identify changes or modifications necessary in group processes and works toward carrying out those changes

Consistently implements changes or modifications necessary in group processes

Consistently helps implement changes or modifications necessary in group processes

Sporadically helps implement changes or modifications necessary in group processes

Rarely, if ever, helps implement changes or modifications necessary in group processes

Effectively performs a variety of roles within a group

Fulfills all obligations of assigned role

Fulfills most obligations of assigned role

Fulfills some obligations of assigned role

Fulfills few obligations of assigned role

Fulfills no obligations of assigned role

 

 

 

 

 

US History Honors PowerPoint Presentation Rubric

 

 

 

6

5

4

3

2

1

Argument:

addresses thesis, question complexity, source analysis, thoroughness of evidence

 

Thesis is well-developed and clearly focused; demonstrates insight and original thinking, connections to own experience and/or prior knowledge

Thesis is well-developed and clearly focused; acknowledges the complexity of the question itself; confrontation and discussion of conflicting sources and information

Thesis must be consistent and controlled; may not be as focused as in top category

Limited or partially developed thesis which addressed question somewhat; more descriptive than analytic; may not discuss entire question

Confused, unsupported, poorly developed thesis; limited understanding of question; ineffective or inaccurate analysis

No thesis or an irrelevant one; inadequate or inaccurate understanding of question

Presentation:

quality of interaction with audience

 

Loud and clear, rehearsal evident, consistent eye contact, cooperative effort, good group communication, answer audience questions with insight; effective style and tone, capitalizes on audience level of interest and knowledge; exceeds requirements

Loud and clear, rehearsal evident, consistent eye contact, cooperative effort, good group communication, answer audience questions with insight;

Loud and clear, rehearsed but may need polish in areas, eye contact,  answers most questions, everyone contributes but not necessarily equally; style and tone consistent with audience level of interest and knowledge

Some eye contact, meets minimum requirements, one leader/speaker (not a group effort), some parts are effective but not consistent, attempts audience questions; style and tone sometimes appropriate, sporadically acknowledges audience interest and knowledge

May read to class, lacking eye contact, speaking not always clear, mispronunciations, not cooperative effort, needs rehearsal, style and tone seldom appropriate, rarely acknowledges audience interest and knowledge

Haven't taken assignment seriously, joking or arguing with group, choppy lacking rehearsal and organization; mispronunciations, can't answer questions lacking eye contact, doesn't even meet minimum requirements; no awareness of audience

PowerPoint:

use of visual devices

 

Sustained and seamless use of technical devices and content relevant visuals establishes a clear visual pattern that aids audience understanding

Purposeful use of animations and devices; main points are evident on slides and expanded through presentation; good, relevant visuals directly reflect content

Purposeful use of animations and devices; main points are evident on slides and expanded through presentation; good, relevant visuals

Overuse of animations and technical animations/devices; too much text, needs to be condensed

Inappropriate use of animations, devices, images; a paper on a slide

Incomplete; lack of or irrelevant devices and images

 

 

 

US History Honors Debates Rubric

 

 

 

Criterion

1

2

3

4

5

 

 

Research

Minimal search for information restricted to personal knowledge; largely support for one side of debate.

Some information sought beyond the personal to that of other people; some consideration given to determining the arguments of the other side.

Sufficient support sought from at least two types of sources, personal and documentary; support for both sides sought and considered.

Careful and considerable support sought from personal, documentary and other general sources; balanced support for both sides sought and analyzed.

Thorough search through multiple, topic-specific sources of information: documentary, electronic, human; in-depth support for both sides sought, analyzed and evaluated.

 

 

Position

Position statement is missing or unclear and seems to include both sides or be irrelevant; arguments are illogical, irrelevant or off topic and confuse the audience; support for statements is not offered beyond personal assertion; position does not maintain audience interest.

Position statement is very general and may include irrelevant details; position meanders and confuses; little appropriate support is given; analysis is absent or simplistic.

Position statement is clear and begins to persuade; gives some support, though not all support is well-chosen; some analysis is attempted and examples are selected to support.

Position statement is persuasive; arguments are solid and mostly well-chosen; analysis is clear and mostly correct; examples are appropriate.

A clear position statement illuminates the essentials of the topic succinctly; arguments are valid, coherent and logical, showing sophisticated analysis of complex issues; critical support is given through examples and evidence that are thorough and insightful. In short, position is convincing and effective.

 

 

Presentation

Uses little of time allotment or ignores time limit until reminded; nervousness or bravado grate on audience; language is confused and confusing; arguments are irrelevant or poorly supported; is rude to opponents.

Either uses little of allotted time or goes over time allotment; is clearly nervous which interferes somewhat with presentation; language is imprecise and in places confused; subordinate and main points are given equal weight; ignores or dismisses opponents.

Does not go over time allotment; is generally well-spoken with only moments of nervousness visible; makes good arguments; stays on topic using clear language and gives main arguments; is polite to opponents.

Almost all time is used, but does not go over; speaks with some confidence and makes persuasive arguments using clear and appropriate language; is able to think on the spot of relevant arguments; is careful with opponents.

Complete time is used, but does not go over; speaks confidently and convincingly using clear, vivid and precise language; is able to make succinct and telling arguments on the spot; is respectful of opponents.

 

 

 

 

GRADING SCALE

 

Weight

 

 

General Assignment

15%

Notebook

25%

Quiz

30%

Test

30%

 

Grade

 

 

Letter Grade A

100-93

Letter Grade B

92-85

Letter Grade C

84-78

Letter Grade D

77-70

Letter Grade F

69-Below

 

 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGIES

 

Students will have access to a wide spectrum of challenging, thought provoking, relevant instruction materials to achieve growth in the course. In additional to multiple texts and primary sources, students will have monitored access to the World Wide Web, a variety of data manipulation and desktop publishing software applications, interactive skills software, thinking map and graphic organizer applications, and the computers and/or computer labs along with peripherals devices should as data projectors, digital cameras, scanners and printers required to give them the technological tools required to gain skills and achieve academic excellence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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