Webliography

Here are a few websites I have used and can see myself using as an educator in the future:

 

Teaching Books
Teaching books is a neat website that allows you to search up books and has a lot of literary resources available for use. It has author interviews, book lists, book activities, and more. This would be excellent to use when putting together your lesson plans.

NASA: Solar System
This link takes you to a interactive page on the NASA website and allows you to interact with different entities in the solar system. This one specifically is linked to the moon and you are able to manipulate some parts of the graphic to show the moon's core and see the monthly phases of the moon as they would appear in the sky. You are able to explore and see the planets as well. I can see a teacher using this to better provide a visual for something their students would have trouble seeing with the naked eye or without a telescope.

Khan Academy
Khan Academy is something I have seen primarily used with late middle school or high school students for videos explaining math concepts and have found, based on personal experience as a student, it to be helpful when trying to better understand something I didn't the first time. Besides videos, this site also offers practice problems. I eventually found that they offer the same for students in elementary school. One of the best aspects of this site is that it is FREE, unlike some other websites that require a subscription for best access. 

Crayola Lesson Plans
Crayola's main website has an area that for teachers that offers lesson plans in all subjects: Language Arts, Math, STEAM, and Social Studies. I can see myself going to these lesson plans for more hands on crafts I think will help solidify a concept with my students, in line with the curriculum I'm using. I also like how the lesson plans specify what you will need/an estimate of time needed for the project and that I could build up and turn their idea into something that is what I need for my students. 

TED-Ed
We have all seen a TED video at one point or another. I was surprised to find that TED offers a whole different portion of educational videos on a variety of subjects teacher can use with older students in late elementary up to high school students. Another thing I thought was super interesting and useful is that they allow you to build a lesson plan incorporating the videos they have available and when you have completed it, you are able to save the link and use it to refer to your lesson and the video later. Anyone you give the link to is able to use it so you could easily share the link with older students and they could use it to refer back to what you covered in class when working on homework. Your lesson can also become interactive by incorporating questions into your lesson plan (multiple choice or open answer), allowing your students to answer from whatever device they access your lesson from.