Example: A Literature Unit Using Differentiated Instruction and Evaluation, as Well as an Integration of Subjects

 

This is an Example of an integrated Unit Plan that includes differentiated instruction and assessments.  It covers five lesson plans for a second grade language arts unit on the novel Finding the Titanic.  Each student’s needs have been carefully considered.  Each lesson includes a character principle.  The five lesson plans in this unit are: Geography, Measurement, Non-fiction Book Reports, Grammar, and Responding to Literature.

Integrated Unit Plan

Candidate:  Kelly Snell

I.  UNIT INFORMATION

Subject: Language Arts

Grade/Topic:  The unit is written for 2nd grade.  The topic is: The Titanic

State and National Standards addressed by the Unit:

State Standards: South Carolina

     Language Arts:

          2-1.7. Student will be able to create responses to literary texts through a variety of

                     methods.

          2-1.9. Explain cause-and-effect in literary texts.

          2-2.1. Student will be able to comprehend a variety of literary texts.

          2-2.3. Distinguish between facts and opinions in informational texts.

          2-2.4. Create responses to informational texts through a variety of methods.

          2-3.1. Vocabulary Development: Use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar

                     words.

           2-3.7. Fluency: Use appropriate rate, word automaticity, phrasing, and expression to read

                     fluently.

 

        Science and Math:

             2-5.3.Student will use appropriate tools and units to measure objects to the nearest whole   

                      unit: length, liquid volume, weight, and temperature.

   State Standards: Virginia

       Language Arts:

          2.6a. The student will use information in the story to read words.

          2.6d. The student will reread and self-correct.

          2.7d. Discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary by listening and reading a

                   variety of texts.

          2.7e. Use vocabulary from other content areas.

          2.9d.The student will set a purpose for reading.

          2.9e. Ask and answer questions about what was read.

          2.9h. Read and reread passages with fluency, accuracy, and meaningful expression.

         2.10d. Use online resources.

         2.13a. Recognize and use complete sentences.

         2.13c. Capitalize all proper nouns and the word I.

         2.13j. Use verbs and adjectives correctly in sentences.

    History and Social Science:

          2.5a. The student will develop map skills locating the equator, seven continents, and five

                  oceans on maps and globes.

          2.1f. Student will be able to recognize direct cause and effect relationships.

          2.10e. The student will explain the responsibility of a good citizen with emphasis on   

                     practicing honesty and trustworthiness.

          2.llf. The student will be able to explain the responsibilities of a good citizen with

                   emphasis on the purpose of rules and laws.

            

       Science:

           2.1e. The student will conduct an investigation in which temperature measurements are  

                    made in Metric units and Standard English units.         

           2.3b. The student will investigate and understand basic properties of solids, liquids, and     

                    gasses.  Key concepts include processes involved with changes in matter from one

                    state to another.

 

National Standards:

   Language Arts:

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
  • Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
  • Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate    

            understanding of key details in a text.

  •  Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.
  •  Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive    readings.
  •  Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  •  Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
  •  Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.
  •  Recognize idioms, synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms in context.
  •  Use complete sentences in writing.
  •  By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies.

     Math:

  •   Measure length to determine differences in centimeter, millimeter, and inches.

 

Character Education Goals: 

  1. Empathy: Students will put themselves into the position of the passengers on the Titanic and will explain orally during discussion time with the teacher and in writing in their response journals, what kinds of things they might do if faced with a terrible situation such as this one.  Students will take part in a demonstration where they put their hands into water that is filled with ice.  We will talk about what the survivors floating in the ocean must have felt like.

 

  1. Gratefulness:  Students will consider all that they have to be grateful for in their lives and share these verbally during discussion with the class and the teacher and in writing in their response journals.  We will discuss how Ruth must have felt when she was reunited with her family.

 

  1. Leadership:  Students will discuss orally and in writing what it is that makes a person a

great leader.  The teacher will discuss the character of several great leaders and some not

so great leaders.  The teacher will talk about the poor decisions that many people feel that both the builder of the Titanic and the captain of the Titanic made.

 

 

  1. Values: Students will decide what is most important in their own lives in oral

Discussions with the teacher and with the class and in writing in their response

Journals.  The teacher will tell the class that many people feel that the Titanic should not be disturbed and that it is disrespectful to those 1,500 people who lost their lives.  The teacher will lead a discussion on how the students feel about leaving the Titanic as a grave. 

 

  1. Responsibility: Students will understand that everything that they think, do, or say effects

others. The teacher will use examples from the Titanic to show that every action brings

about a reaction.  Students will practice exercises in cause and effect in their Finding the Titanic workbook.

Instructional Goals:  The instructional goals of this unit are that students will be able to:

1.  Recall the details of the sinking of the Titanic on a teacher-created assessment.

2.  Enjoy a literary work and respond with a creative project.

3.  Read with expression.

4.  Demonstrate knowledge of the rules of grammar; including nouns, verbs, adverbs, quotation

     marks, punctuation, prepositions, contractions, and possessives.

5.  Students will write a second-grade level book report about the book Finding the Titanic.

6.  Students will demonstrate an understanding of the difference in fact and opinion.

7.  Students will demonstrate an understanding of cause/effect.  They will infer that every  

     action brings about a reaction.

 

Instructional Objectives

  1. After reading the novel, Finding the Titanic, as a class, and given multiple choice quizzes

and a test, students will be able to decipher the correct answer to the questions 8 out of 10 times on each assessment.

  1. After discussing which type of literature Finding the Titanic falls under, and given

examples of different kinds of literature, students will be able to correctly identify and classify books by genre 9/10 times.   

  1. Given examples of completed second grade book reports, students will be able to     

complete a graphic organizer and to write a second-grade level book report that will be edited, revised, and published with no more than two errors on the published report.

  1. Given examples from the book, Finding the Titanic, students will correctly distinguish  

fact VS opinion 5/6 times in their Finding the Titanic workbook.

  1. Given maps, globes, and reference materials, students will label the seven continents and  

5 oceans correctly on a map with fewer than two errors.

  1. Given 20 passages from the novel, students will correctly identify proper nouns, verbs,

and adverbs from 18 out of 20 of the questions in the grammar section of the Finding the Titanic workbook.

  1. Given water, students will create the 3 states of matter (Solid, Liquid, and Gas) and will record the temperatures in Fahrenheit and in Celsius in their response workbook with no errors.
  2. Given 6 statements in their workbook on the Titanic, students will label each statement

correctly as either fact or opinion correctly 5 out of 6 of the times.

  1. Given the words voyage, survivor, hull, iceberg, unsinkable, wreckage, and shipwreck,

students will define 6/7 words correctly using a dictionary and given the definitions of these vocabulary words, will draw and color an illustration of each, creating a picture dictionary.

  1. Given 10 passages from the novel, students will read, identify, and label idioms, similes,

personification, hyperbole, and metaphors with fewer than 2 mistakes.

 

 

Overview of the Learning Activities:

Lesson 1 Activities:

  1. Using classroom reference materials such a globe, a world map, and an atlas, students will label the 7 continents and 5 oceans on a blank map provided by the teacher.
  2. Students will listen to speeches written by different leaders and discuss them (MLK, Jr. and JFK).
  3. Students will sit in a circle and identify the genre of 10 different books held up by the teacher.
  4. Students will watch a documentary on the Titanic. (National Geographic Kids icon on classroom computer).
  5. Literature Circle: Students will take turns reading and discussing the novel. They will practice reading fluency and expression.
  6. Students will take an online quiz on the classroom computer on the oceans and continents using BrainPop, Jr. (Geography App).
  7. Students will use classroom dictionaries to look up new vocabulary words (Titanic Workbook) and they will make a picture dictionary using tag board and markers. Students will define voyage, survivor, hull, iceberg, unsinkable, wreckage, and shipwreck. They will draw and color an illustration of each, creating a picture dictionary.
  8. Journal: Students will respond to journal topics such as the shortage of lifeboats and what

makes a person a good leader?

 

Lesson 2 Activities:

 

  1. Literature Circle: Students will take turns reading and discussing the novel. They will practice reading fluency and expression to chapter 5 of the novel.
  2. Students will take a multiple choice quiz at their desks on chapters 1-4 of Finding the Titanic. (Paper quiz and open book).
  3. Ice water experiment: Students will put their hands into a bowl of ice water to understand

             how cold the water must have been for Ruth Becker.  Students will complete a lab sheet

             on the changes in matter RE: liquid, solid, gas. Freezing temperatures will be discussed

             in  Fahrenheit and Celsius. 

  1. Students will complete a worksheet correctly labeling temperatures in Fahrenheit and Celsius (Titanic workbook).
  2. Students will practice using quotation marks, punctuation, prepositions, adverbs and

verbs, contractions, and possessives in completing a workbook about the novel.

  1. Journal: Students will respond to journal topic.  (Ruth Becker and coming to America).

Lesson 3 Activities:

 

  1. Students will sit in a circle and take turns reading chapters 5 and 6 of novel.
  2. Students will note the difference in fact and opinion sentences in their workbooks

about the Titanic.

  1. Students will sit in a circle and listen to the teacher read an example of a non-fiction book report.
  2. Students will create their graphic organizers at their desks for their book report (worksheet).
  3. Students will write the first draft of their book report.  (ZB Lined Paper).
  4. Journal: Students will respond to journal topic.  (3-5 sentences about what they are most grateful for).

Lesson 4 Activities:

 

  1. Students will use teacher’s editing marks to correct their book reports and to write the final draft.

     2.   Students will complete a cause and effect chart about our novel determining the cause or

            the effect of a situation from the novel (Titanic Workbook).

  1. Students will write in their journals about what is most important in their own lives and they will read these in front of the class.

Lesson 5 Activities:

 

  1. Students will sit in a circle and look at examples of diagrams, Acrostic Poems, and graphic novels.  They are to choose which one they would like to do as part of their assessment.
  2. Figurative language: Students will work with nouns, verbs, adverbs, idioms, similes, personification, hyperbole,  and metaphors at their desks (Titanic Workbook).
  3. Students will share their projects in front of the class.
  4. Students will sit in a circle and give examples of why it is not good to be prideful.     

Learning Style Allowances:

       Students (visual learners) will watch a documentary on the Titanic as well as reading the novel.     Auditory learners will learn from the teacher’s lectures and from the teacher’s question and answer sessions, as well as from the documentary on the Titanic.  Visual learners will learn from the notes written on the dry erase board. Kinestethic learners will learn from a hands-on ice water demonstration lab and will sit in the floor and draw a diagram of the reader’s idea of an unsinkable ship and scenes from the novel using butcher block paper either individually or with a group.

       Above level students will write an acrostic poem about Titanic.  Above level students will create a graphic novel of 4 panels telling the story of the Titanic.

       Quizzes and tests will be read to the entire class along with the answers to multiple-choice questions to accommodate below level readers.  Lower-level readers will be allowed to respond to discussion questions orally and the teacher may document the answers and assist with spelling.

Comprehensive List of Necessary Resources and Materials:

      A copy of Finding the Titanic by Robert Ballard for each student, Cooler filled with ice and water,  A copy of Finding the Titanic Workbook for each student, Titanic test and quizzes, Classical music CD, cookies, teacups, lemonade, Diagrams of the Titanic, MLK, Jr. I Have a Dream speech, JFK Speech, Book Report Form, Bucher Block Paper, Response Journal, Lab sheets for experiment, Rulers, Map of continents and oceans, globe, Brainpop.com, Finding the Titanic – Explorer Video – National Geographic 8/12/2011, Graphic novel panel outline, ZB lined paper

 

Description of how this Unit Provides Integration / Cross-Curricular Connections:

     We are learning how to write book reports in English Grammar so students will follow this novel study with a book report.  We are also completing a math unit on time and measurement so we will use this book study to learn about Fahrenheit and Celsius. We are also learning about what makes a good leader in social studies.  We are studying maps in geography.  We are learning about mater and temperature in Fahrenheit and Celsius in science.

Overview of Formative and Summative Assessments:

     We will discuss the novel as it is read and students will respond orally and in writing to discussion questions.  This is a formative assessment.  Students will complete a book report for part of their English Grammar grade.  This will be a summative assessment. Students will also complete a comprehensive workbook on the novel Finding the Titanic as part of a summative assessment.  Quizzes and Teacher-created tests will be taken on the novel.  These are both formative and summative.  We will complete science labs in class.  Their lab sheets on the freezing point of water will be formative.  Finally, journal entries as response to our readings will be formative.

II. LESSON PLANS

Lesson Plan 1

 

I.  Subject and Grade Level: Language Arts Grade 2   Duration: 1-2 Days

II.  Topic: Finding the Titanic

III.  Standards:

              Virginia:

               History and Social Studies:

                          2.5.a The student will develop map skills locating the equator, seven  

                                    continents, and five oceans on maps and globes.

                          2.10e Student will explain the responsibilities of a good citizen with

                                    the emphasis on practicing honesty and trustworthiness.

                           2.11f. The student will be able to explain the responsibilities of a good

                                      citizen with the emphasis on the purpose of rules and laws.

               Language Arts:

                          2.6a. The student will use information in the story to read words.

                          2.6d. The student will read and self-correct.

                          2.7d. Discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary by listening and  

                                    reading a variety of texts.

               National:

  • Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author

wants to answer, explain, or describe.

  • Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
  • Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and

expression on successive readings.

  • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and

understanding, rereading as necessary.

  • Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

 

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant

to a grade 2 topic or subject area.

 

IV.  Measurable Objectives:

  1. Given maps, globes, and reference materials, student will label the seven continents and five oceans correctly on a map with fewer than two errors.

 

  1. When taking the “hard” online quiz at brainpopjr.com, students will

answer 5/5 questions correctly.     

  1. Given the words voyage, survivor, hull, iceberg, unsinkable, wreckage, and shipwreck, students will define 6/7 correctly using a dictionary and given the definitions of these vocabulary words, will draw and color an illustration of each, creating a picture dictionary.                                               

                                              

V.  Materials: Blank maps for each student, globes, and maps of the continents and

           oceans. Microwave, cup of liquid, ice, ice chest, water, pencils, dry erase board and

           markers, MLK, Jr. Speech, John F. Kennedy Speech, Computer w/ website for

          National Geographic Kids/Titanic, Copies of Finding the Titanic by

          Robert Ballard for the teacher and each student,  Picture Dictionary,  Tag board, markers,

          Journals, Biography of Robert Ballard, Brainpop,Jr. Website

 

VI.  Character Education Principle:

                     Leadership: Students will discuss orally and in writing what it means to be a

                     great leader.

VII.  Set:

Teacher will ask the students what they think makes someone a good leader.  The teacher will write the student’s answers on the dry erase board and the answers will be discussed. The teacher will explain that as their journal topic, students will discuss what makes a good leader.

 

The teacher will read one speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. and one speech by John F.              Kennedy.  The teacher will ask what the students think the speakers meant in each of their speeches.  The teacher will explain what was going on in our country at the time the speeches were written.

 

The teacher will ask the students what they know about the Titanic.  The teacher will tell the students that they will be learning about the Titanic and that, while the captain of the Titanic was a leader, he may not have been a good leader and that they will learn about the reasons. The teacher will show the students the book Finding the Titanic by Robert Ballard and will ask the class why they think the author decided to write the book.  The teacher will show a documentary of the sinking of the Titanic on the classroom computer produced by National Geographic for Kids.  The teacher will discuss who Robert Ballard is and his expeditions.

 

The teacher will explain that there are 7 continents and 5 oceans and that the Titanic sank in the Atlantic Ocean and could not be found for a long time because it was two miles under the ocean and no divers could go down that far.  The teacher will tell the students that they will use maps, globes, and atlases to label the 7 continents and 5 oceans.  The teacher will explain that the students will also take an individual online quiz at BrainPop, Jr.com on the 7 continents and the 5 oceans.

 

The teacher will describe different genres in literature.   After discussing what type of literature Finding the Titanic is, students will classify 10 different books as they are held up by the teacher as either fiction, nonfiction, historic fiction, realistic fiction, science fiction, fantasy, or reference and the students will discuss with the teacher why they chose this category.

 

The teacher will explain that there are new vocabulary words contained in the book Finding the Titanic and that the students will be divided into groups and that they will create a picture dictionary of these vocabulary words using the provided tag board, markers, and a second grade level dictionary.

IX.  Guided Practice:

  1. Students will be assigned groups and will label the seven continents and 5 oceans on a blank world map using globes, atlases, and world maps.
  2. While in assigned groups, students will define assigned vocabulary words from the novel and will then create an illustration to go along with the definition.  The vocabulary words and illustrations will be bound together to create a class picture dictionary.
  3. As a class, students will take turns reading orally and with expression chapters 1 and 2 from Finding the Titanic.

d.   As a class, students will orally answer questions about chapters one and two when called on by the teacher.

VIII.  Instruction:

     Learning Style Allowances:    

     Auditory learners will learn from the teacher’s lectures and from the teacher’s question and answer sessions, as well as from the documentary on the Titanic.  Visual learners will learn from the notes written on the dry erase board.  Kinesthetic learners will learn from taking an online quiz, making the picture dictionaries, labeling the maps using maps, globes, and atlases, and by taking part in the group discussions.

 

  Question and Answer Sessions are done by pulling sticks to ensure that the faster students are not the only ones answering the questions and stating their opinions.  Appropriate “wait times” will be given.

 

     Since a number of the students are “gifted”, instruction is given on or above grade level.  The “gifted” students will help the teacher help the other “on or below level” students once their work is complete.

 

Learning style allowances include:

 

  1. When divided into three groups on rugs around the classroom, each group will contain at least one “gifted” student to lead the activity. 
  2.   Those students with learning disabilities such as “developmentally delayed” or “autism” will have any work that they are unable to complete in class sent home to be completed with their parents with in the next two days and then returned to me.
  3.  The questions and the answers on the online quiz will be read to the non-readers.
  4.  The teacher will ask the non-readers what they would like to write in their response journals and will write the sentences for them, having the student copy the sentences below the teacher’s sentences.

  5.   “Gifted” students who finish early may work on their SRA Reading, SRA Math folder,

 or one of our ongoing reading challenges either at their desks or in the reading corner.

 

X.  Independent Practice:

            After guided practice, students will each take an online quiz on the seven continents and the five oceans on the BrainPop, Jr. Website.  While not taking the quiz during seatwork time, students will be writing in their response journals about what they think makes a great leader naming at least 3 characteristics of a good leader.  The student will bring his or her journal to the teacher when complete and any mistakes in spelling or content will be corrected by the student until there are no mistakes in spelling and the student has 3-5 sentences explaining the qualities of a good leader. They will then name the water sled that looked for the Titanic.  Next, they will tell in what ocean the Titanic sank.  Students will answer these questions in complete sentence form and will answer all three questions correctly following editing and re-writing.        

                                              

XI. Closure: Discussion will take place as the lesson goes on.  We will continue to review what we have learned in writing in the student journals.

 

XII.  Evaluation:

         We will discuss as a class what we have learned.  The teacher will use observation and oral questioning.  The students will complete maps in groups and will complete online quizzes individually.  Students will respond to the key concepts in their response journals.

 

Lesson Plan 2

I.  Subject and Grade Level: Language Arts Grade 2 Duration: 1-2 days

II.  Topic: The Titanic

III.  Standards:

                Virginia:

                 Language Arts:

                                2.7e   Use vocabulary from other content areas.

                                2.9d   The student will set a purpose for reading.

                                2.9e    Ask and answer questions about what was read.

                                2.9h   Read and reread passages with fluency, accuracy, and 

                                           meaningful expression.

                  Science:

                                2.1e.   The student will conduct an investigation in which temperature

                                           measurements are made in metric units and standard English

                                           units.

                                 2.3b.  The student will investigate and understand basic properties of

                                            solids, liquids, and gasses.  Key concepts include processes

                                            involved in changes in matter from one state to another.

 

               South Carolina:

                Language Arts:

                                 2-3.1. Vocabulary Development: Use context clues to determine the

                                            meaning of unfamiliar words.

                                 2-3.7. Fluency: Use appropriate rate, word automaticity, phrasing,

                                            and expression to read fluently.

                Science:

                               2-5.3. Students will use appropriate tools and units to measure

                                          Objects to the nearest whole unit: length, liquid volume,

                                           Weight, and temperature.

                National:

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant

to a grade 2 topic or subject area.

 

IV.  Measureable Objectives:

  1. Given ice water, students will measure and record the temperatures in Fahrenheit and in Celsius in their response workbook with no errors.
  2. Given 20 multiple choice questions on an open book quiz on

Chapters 1-4, students will answer 18-20 questions correctly.

 

V.  Materials: Response journals, Titanic Workbook for each student, cooler, ice, thermometer, quiz, ZB lined paper for each student

VI.  Character Education Principle: Empathy

VII.  Set:

     The teacher will ask students what the three states of matter are.  The teacher will write these on the dry erase board.  The teacher will show the students the three states of matter using water, ice, and steam (hot liquid from the microwave). The teacher will ask students which state each represents.  The teacher will then show students an outdoor thermometer and ask students what the freezing point of water is.  The teacher will then ask is the students know what Fahrenheit and Celsius are and what the freezing point of each is.  After discussing the correct answers, the teacher will write them on the dry erase board and will have each student put his or her hand into the chest containing ice and water and tell the student to imagine floating in the icy waters after the Titanic sank. 

 

     Following the demonstration, the teacher will write a couple of phrases from Finding the Titanic on the board that contain quotation marks.  The teacher will explain the use of quotation marks.  The teacher will then write sentences on the board and have each student go to the board and attempt to put quotation marks in the correct spots. The teacher will explain that the students will be doing this independently on their Finding the Titanic workbook page on quotation marks.

VIII.  Instruction:

     Learning Style Allowances:    

     Auditory learners will learn from the teacher’s lectures and from the teacher’s question and answer sessions.  Visual learners will learn from the notes written on the dry erase board as well as the board work on quotation marks.  Kinesthetic learners will learn from taking part in the freezing water demonstration as well as the board work on quotation marks.

 

 Question and Answer Sessions are done by pulling sticks to ensure that the faster students are not the only ones answering the questions and stating their opinions.  Appropriate “wait times” will be given.

 

     The “gifted” students will help the teacher help the other “on or below level” students once their work is complete. 

   

Accommodation/Differentiation Allowances:

  1.  On the quiz on chapters 1-4, the teacher will read all of the questions and all of the answer choices to the entire class for those students who cannot read. 
  2. The teacher will repeat the questions and the answer choices on the quiz as many times as necessary for the slower learners and the non-readers.  
  3. The slower or non-readers will try to sound out words on their turns to read. A strong reader will be placed beside each slower or non-reader in the class.  The student sitting beside these students will help him or her if they are unable to decode the words.

                 

IX.  Guided Practice:

  1. The students will take turns going to the board and placing quotation marks correctly in a sentence from the novel Finding the Titanic.
  2. Students will take turns reading chapters 3 and 4 orally with fluency and expression.

 

  1. X.  Independent Practice: After guided practice, students will write in the response journals.  Students will write 3-5 sentences about Ruth Becker and how they would have felt coming to a new country after floating in a lifeboat not knowing if your family was okay.  They will bring their responses to me and their responses will be edited and rewritten until correct. Students will use quotation marks correctly in marking passages in their Titanic workbook. They will bring their workbooks to me and we will edit and rewrite until correct.

 

XI. Closure: Discussion of novel as we read.

XII. Evaluation:  Students will write in their response journals. Students will take a multiple

                               choice paper quiz on chapters 1-4.  They may use their books.

Lesson Plan 3

I.  Subject and Grade Level: Language Arts Grade 2           Duration 2 Days

II.  Topic: The Titanic

III.  Standards:

                 SC:                 

                  Language Arts:

                             2-1.7. Students will be able to create responses to literary texts through

                                        a variety of methods.

                              2-2.3. Students will be able to distinguish between facts and opinions in

                                         informational texts.

IV.  Measureable Objectives:

  1. Given 6 statements from their workbook on Finding the Titanic,

students will label statements correctly as either fact or opinion

5 out of 6 times.

 

V.  Materials: Titanic Workbook, Graphic Organizers for non-fiction book reports, examples of non-fiction book reports, Computer with A.R. Test Finding the Titanic on it, Response Journals.

VI.  Character Education Principle: Gratefulness

VII. Set:

Teacher will explain to the students that they will be doing a non-fiction book report.  The teacher will read an example of a non-fiction book report to the class.

 

The teacher will ask the class the difference in a fact and an opinion. The teacher will write the definition of each on the board.  The teacher will then read examples of facts and opinions and call on students to answer whether the statement is a fact or an opinion. 

 

The teacher will ask students what it means to be grateful.  The teacher will write the student’s answers on the dry erase board.  The teacher will tell students that 1,500 people died when the Titanic sunk and that the people who were rescued were grateful that they had their lives when they were rescued and some were reunited with their loved ones.  The teacher will ask students what they are grateful for and will write their answers on the dry erase board. The teacher will tell students that they will be responding to this question in their response journals later.

VIII.  Instruction: 

   Learning Style Allowances:    

     Auditory learners will learn from the teacher’s lectures and from the teacher’s question and answer sessions.  Visual learners will learn from the notes written on the dry erase board as well as the board work examples of gratefulness.  Kinesthetic learners will learn from activities done on the dry erase board.

 

Accommodation/Differentiation Allowances:

  1. Question and Answer Sessions are done by pulling sticks to ensure that the faster students are not the only ones answering the questions and stating their opinions.  Appropriate “wait times” will be given.
  2. The “gifted” students will help the teacher to help the other “on or below level” students once their work is complete to brainstorm and to complete their graphic organizers and to write the first draft of their book reports once the teacher has checked their graphic organizer and made any changes necessary.     
  3. If the students with more severe disabilities such as autism and developmentally or language delayed are not able to complete their graphic organizers and to write the first drafts of their book reports, instruction, a graphic organizer and a book report template will be sent home to their parents and the student will be given two days to complete and return them.    

IX.  Guided Practice:

  1. Students will read with fluency and expression chapters 5-6.
  2. Students will brainstorm and then complete a graphic organizer for their non-fiction book report.
  3. Students will write the first draft of their non-fiction book report.
  4. Students will respond to journal prompt in their journals about what they are most grateful for in 3-5 sentences.

X.  Independent Practice:

     After guided practice and student participation, students will label statements in their Finding the Titanic workbook as either fact or opinion.  When the page is complete, the student will have labeled 5 out of the 6 statements as either fact or opinion correctly. If any statement is incorrect, the student will be called to the teacher’s desk and it will be explained why his or her answer was not correct and will be let to correct it.

XI. Closure: Review facts from the novel and talk about gratefulness. 

XII.  Evaluation:

     We will discuss, as a class, the answers to the workbook questions on fact and opinion.  Students will read their responses in their journals about what they are most grateful for.                           

 

Lesson Plan 4

I.  Subject and Grade Level: Language Arts        Grade 2

II.  Topic:  The Titanic

III.  Standards:

                  Virginia:                        

                   History and Social Science:

                            2.1f     Student will be able to recognize direct cause and effect

                                        relationships.

                   Language Arts:

                            2.13a   Student will recognize and use complete sentences.

                            2.13c   Capitalize all proper nouns and the word I.

                            2.13j    Use verbs and adjectives correctly in sentences.

 

IV. Measurable Objectives:

  1. Given examples of completed second grade book reports, students will be able to complete a graphic organizer and write a second grade level book report that will be edited, revised, and published with no more than two errors.

V.  Materials: First drafts of book reports with editing marks.

VI. Character Education Principle: Values – What is most important in your own life?

 

VII.  Set:

          The teacher will explain to the students that they are going to look at the corrections on their book reports and that they will re-write the book report making these corrections and that this is called editing and rewriting.  The teacher will tell the students that the final book report will be a grade in language art and that turning in your final paper is called publishing.

     The teacher will give examples of cause and effect.  The teacher will then give a cause and ask for an effect.  The teacher will then ask for an effect and ask for a cause.  This will continue until each student has had a turn.  The causes and the effects will be listed on the dry erase board.  The teacher will ask students what is most important in their lives.  The responses will be listed on the dry erase board.  The teacher will tell students that they will be writing about this topic in their response journals.  The teacher will tell students that their responses will be read standing in front of the class in order to practice their public speaking skills.

VIII.  Instruction:

     Learning Style Allowances:

Auditory learners will learn from the teacher’s lectures and from the teacher’s question and answer sessions.  Visual learners will learn from the notes written on the dry erase board. Kinesthetic learners will learn from taking part in the public speaking aspect of the lesson.

 

Question and Answer Sessions are done by pulling sticks to ensure that the faster students are not the only ones answering the questions and stating their opinions.  Appropriate “wait times” will be given.

 

 The “gifted” students will help the teacher help the other “on or below level” students once their work is complete. 

 

 

Accommodation/Differentiation Allowances:

  1. On the cause and effect section of the workbook, all of the questions and all of the answer choices will be read to the entire class for those students who cannot read.
  2. The teacher take any students who are unable to complete the workbook activity on cause and effect to the back table and the teacher will repeat the questions and the answers as many times as necessary for the slower learners to complete the cause and effect section of the Titanic workbook.  The teacher will spell words for these students and offer suggestions for answers.
  3. If a student with a learning disability is unable to stand in front of the class to

present his or her completed project for Finding the Titanic, the teacher will either stand in front of the class with the student or the teacher will present the project for the student.                 

IX.  Guided Practice:

  1. Students will complete the cause/effect section of the Titanic Workbook using passages from the book. If any answers are incorrect, the student will be allowed to correct them and it will be explained why the answer was not correct by the teacher.

X.  Independent Practice:

                After guided practice and instruction, students will re-write their book reports and publish them.  Students will also write about what is most important in their lives and why in their response journals.  They will then re-write the final draft of their non-fiction book reports.

XI.  Closure:

            Students will read their responses to the writing prompt in front of the class.

            Published book reports will be placed on the classroom bulletin board.

XII.  Evaluation:

     The final draft of the book report will count as a test grade in language arts.

Lesson Plan 5

I.  Subject and Grade Level: Language Arts   Grade 2            Duration: 1- 2 days

II.  Topic:  The Titanic

III.  Standards:

     National:    

     Language Arts:   

Students will describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.  They will use complete sentences in writing and will read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies.   

 

     South Carolina:

              2-2.4 Create responses to informational texts through a variety of methods.

              2-2.1 Student will be able to comprehend a variety of literary texts.

                            

IV.  Measurable Objectives:

                        Given a choice of projects, students will choose one to demonstrate

                         comprehension of the novel.       

V.  Materials: Super Magazine Issue 1, Acrostic Poem Paper, Diagrams of the Titanic, Poster board, Graphic Novel Panels, examples of Acrostic poems. Practice sheets on nouns, verbs, and adverbs.

VI. Character Education Principle: Courage.  The Bible teaches the importance of courageously doing our duty to God and others.  When the lifeboats were being loaded, the rule was “women and children first”. A few men acted cowardly, but most did not.

There is a danger in being prideful.  The designer of the Titanic said that it was not possible that it could sink.

VII.  Set:

The teacher will show the students diagrams of the Titanic and explain to the students that the designer of the Titanic said that it was impossible for the ship to sink therefore, there were not enough lifeboats on the ship.

 

The teacher will explain that some feel that the captain of the Titanic, Captain Smith, was reckless in his speeding through the night when icebergs had been sighted and that the designer of the Titanic was prideful when he said his ship was unsinkable.

 

The teacher will then show students examples of Acrostic Poems and an example of a graphic novel from Super Magazine. The teacher will draw a timeline of the Titanic from the novel and explain to students that they are to choose four dates from the timeline for the four panels of their graphic novel if they decide to choose the graphic novel as their project.  The teacher will explain to students how each is done properly on the dry erase board. 

 

The teacher will explain to students that as part of their assessment they are to choose to do either an Acrostic Poem, a graphic novel, or create a diagram of an unsinkable ship.

 

The Acrostic Poem is to be done using the letters TITANIC and the graphic novel should use four panels to explain the novel that we read.  In the diagram of an unsinkable ship, the student should design his or her own version of an unsinkable ship using diagrams from the Titanic as a reference.  The teacher will explain that the student creations will be presented in front of the class.

 

The teacher will then explain what idioms, similes, personification, hyperbole, and metaphor are.  The teacher will read different examples from the novel and students will be called on to tell which of the above that the statement is an example of.

 

The teacher will ask students to recall what nouns, verbs, and adverbs are.  The teacher will explain to students that they will be practicing working with these in their Finding the Titanic workbook.

VIII.  Instruction:

     Learning Style Allowances:    

Auditory learners will learn from the teacher’s lectures and from the teacher’s question and answer sessions.  Visual learners will learn from the notes written on the dry erase board. Kinesthetic learners will learn from taking part in the public speaking aspect of the lesson as well as the assignments themselves.

 

Question and Answer Sessions are done by pulling sticks to ensure that the faster students are not the only ones answering the questions and stating their opinions.  Appropriate “wait times” will be given.

 

  1.  

IX.  Guided Practice:

     Students will complete an assignment of their choice from the novel Finding the Titanic.                    

X.  Independent Practice:

                   Following guided student practice and participation, students will attempt to complete the following seatwork independently after instructions have been read and questions have been answered:

                   Students will complete a workbook activity using nouns, verbs, and, adverbs.

                   Students will complete workbook pages on passages from Finding the Titanic containing examples of idioms, similes, personification, hyperbole, and metaphor.                     

XI.  Closure:

                     After completing their chosen project, students will share their creations

                     with the class.

XII.  Evaluation:

  1. Students will end the unit by choosing to do either an Acrostic Poem about the Titanic, creating a 4 panel graphic novel about the Titanic, or using diagrams of the Titanic to design and label their own unsinkable ship.
  2. Given 10 passages form the novel, students will read, identify, and label idioms,

similes, personification, hyperbole, and metaphors with fewer than 2 mistakes.

  1. Given 20 passages from the novel, students will correctly identify proper nouns, verbs and adverbs from 18 out of 20 of the questions in the grammar section of the Finding the Titanic workbook.

III. ACCOMMODATION AND DIFFERENTION ALLOWANCES

  1. The “gifted” students will help the teacher to help the other “on or below level” students once their work is complete since it is believed that “peer tutoring” leads to higher order thinking.
  2. Allowances will be made for certain students with learning disabilities who may express themselves in unconventional ways in their retelling of the novel read in class (such as including rabbits in their four graphic novel panels) as long as details are included such as the dates and events from the timeline written on the dry erase board.
  3. The teacher will spell words for students who need help.  The on level students will  

      use their novels and dictionaries to look up the words themselves.         

  1. Non-readers will come to a back table with the teacher following guided student practice and participation and following all directions having been read and all questions being read.  The teacher will then read each sentence in the workbook to the students as they attempt to identify the nouns, verbs, and adverbs.  Help will be given by the teacher until all answers are correct.
  2. Students with learning disabilities will be given as much time as needed to complete book reports, quizzes, projects, and workbooks.  They also may receive help from home.
  3. Auditory learners will learn from teacher instruction.  Visual learners will learn from

videos and notes on the dry erase board.  Kinesthetic learners will learn by participating in the many activities contained in the five lessons and by participating in discussions.

 

 

IV. RESOURCES

Ackerman, B. (2012). G.U.I.D.E. to differentiated instruction for Christian educators.

              Lynchburg, VA: Liberty University Press. ISBN: 9781935986263.       

 Boushey, G. & Moser, J. (2014). The Daily Five (Second Edition): Fostering Literacy  

            Independence in the Elementary Grades. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse Publishers.

 Ciullo, S. (2015). Improving Access to Elementary School Social Studies Instruction.

            Teaching Exceptional Children, 48(2), 102-109. Doi: 10.1177/0040059915605640  

             http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22%22&ff1=subRegular+and +Special+Education+Relationship&ff2=pubGuides+-+Classroom+-+Teacher&id=EJ1080149     

Educationworld.com. (n.d.). Education World. Retrieved February 8, 2016 from

             http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson001.shtml      

Jensen, John (2012). Effective Classroom Turnaround: Practice Makes Perfect [ProQuest 

   ebrary version]. Retrieved  February 8, 2016 from                                                                                                                                          http://site.ebrary.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/lib/liberty/reader.action?docID=10767432

  Kirk, S., Gallagher, J., & Coleman, M. (2015). Educating exceptional children (14th ed.).

                 Stamford, CT: Cengage.                 

  Kubiszyn, T. & Borich, G.D. (2013) Educational Testing & Measurement: Classroom      

                   Application and Practice. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Songs, Inc.       

  Parker, D.V. (2012). Christian teachers in public schools: 13 essentials for the     

         classroom. Kansas City, KS: Beacon Hill Press.     

  Teacher Hub.com (n.d.). Teacher Hub.com. Retrieved February 10, 2016 from

                     http://www.teachhub.com/40-alternative-assessments-learning                  

  Teachers Pay Teachers. (n.d.) Teachers Pay Teachers. Retrieved February 8, 2016 from       

                    www.teacherspayteachers.com