Why Be A Teacher Leader in Special Education?

 


Becoming a Leader:  Both in Your Classroom and in Your School

By

Kelly Snell

   

BECOMING A LEADER IN YOUR CLASSROOM:

 

Four Common Problems and Solutions for Classroom Teachers:

Challenge One: Capturing the attention of young people while  introducing a topic.

 

     CHALLENGE  ONE SOLUTION:

 

WHILE  WRITING LESSON PLANS:

  • DETERMINE WHY YOU ARE EXCITED ABOUT TEACHING THIS LESSON!   
  • INTRODUCE YOUR TOPIC IN AN INTERESTING AND ENTHUSIASTIC WAY
  • ENCOURAGE QUESTIONS AND OPINIONS.
  • EXPLORE THEIR KNOWLEDGE/IDEAS.  ASK, “WHAT IF?”
  • DECIDE WHAT YOU WILL EXPECT THEM TO LEARN AND WHY?  
  • DECIDE WHAT CHOICES YOU WILL GIVE AS FAR AS ASSESSMENTS.
  • BRAINSTORM QUESTIONS TO ASK AND PROBLEMS TO PRESENT.
  • MAKE OR FIND GOOD EXAMPLES OF  PAPERS OR PROJECTS.
 
   

Challenge TWO:

Keeping your students’ attention in this Pokémon world!

SOLUTION TWO: KEEPING YOUR STUDENTS’ ATTENTION:

History of Teaching:

TEACHERS IN THE PAST

  • Were isolated in the classroom.
  • Taught using the teacher’s favored learning style.
  • Saw other adults only in passing and felt responsible for their class only.
  • Talked while the students sat and listened or worked quietly at their desks.
 
   

EFFECTIVE TEACHERS TODAY
  • Work with other teachers to discuss lesson plans and teaching methods that have worked.
  • Include many different learning styles/differentiated assignments that include every student’s strengths.
  • Connect what is being taught to real life.
  • Communicate with  students.
  • Are excited about what they are teaching.
 

Challenge  Three:

Allowing for practice/ experimentation of concepts that were taught while controlling behavior.

SOLUTION THREE: EXTEND KNOWLEDGE AND REINFORCE LEARNING IN ORIGINAL WAYS

In Your Lesson Planning:

  • Decide on projects, skits, or experiments ahead of time.
  • Create a list of websites that you can explore together.
  • Plan some out-of-your-seat activities for your class, not just worksheets but do not give instructions until you have everyone’s attention.
  • Avoid situations where students are left with nothing to do.
  • Hold a Quiz Bowl. 

 

CHALLENGE FOUR: ASSESSING AND EVALUATING WHILE PROVIDING CHOICES

 

SOLUTION FOUR: PUBLISHING

In Your Planning:

  • Consider alternative assessments.
  • Let students present their finished products.
  • Decide if you will use peer review or teacher    review before assessments.
  • Plan to ask  your students what they have learned and consider options such as portfolios for assessments.

 

 

Part II.Becoming A Leader In Your School(And Why You Should Want To Be)

 

# 1.)  You Care About Your School Including Teacher Leadership:

  • Allows the school to take advantage of teacher experience and expertise.
  • Promotes a more professional work environment.
  • Promotes democratic schools and education.

 

  • #2.)  You Are A Grownup:

(Why  Teachers Make Good School Leaders)

  • Teachers practice daily the ability to be self motivated, to control impulses, and to control moods that have the potential to inhibit the ability to think. 
  • Teachers take responsibility for student growth and development.
  • Teachers see themselves as part of something noble and will work together to benefit their students

 

  • #3.)  TEACHING IS A CALLING AND NOT  JUST A JOB!

 

 

References

Bass, B.M., Avolio, B.J., Jung, D. & Berson, Y. (2003). Predicting unit performance by

Assessing transformational and transactional leadership.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 88, 207-218.

Doe, R., Ndinguri, E., & Phipps, S. T. A. (2015). EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE: THE LINK TO SUCCESS AND FAILURE OF LEADERSHIP.Academy of Educational Leadership Journal, 19(3), 105-114. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1768629255?ac   countid=12085

Glickman, C.D., Gordon, S.P., & Ross-Gordon, J.M. (2014). SuperVision and instructional leadership: A developmental approach (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Kellough, J. D., & Jarolimek, J. (2008). Teaching and learning K-8: A guide to methods and resources (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Locke, E.A. (2005). Why emotional intelligence is an invalid concept. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 26(4): 4251431.doi:10.1002/job.318

Onorato, M. (2013). TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP STYLE IN THE EDUCATIONAL SECTOR: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF CORPORATE MANAGERS AND EDUCATIONAL LEADERS. Academy

Of Educational Leadership Journal, 17(1), 33-47. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.liberty.edu: 2048/login?uri=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1368593704?accountid=12085