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Apostrophe Review

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Lesson: Apostrophes (Follow Up Lesson)

Objective

  • The student will further their understanding in regard to the various uses of apostrophes by applying their previously obtained knowledge, solidifying it through class discussion, and implementing it during independent practice. 

TEKS

  • §110.6. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 4.
  • (b) Knowledge and skills.
  • (18) Writing/grammar/usage. The student applies standard grammar and usage to communicate clearly and effectively in writing. The student is expected to:
  • G) write with increasing accuracy when using apostrophes in contractions such as it's and possessives such as Jan's (4-8)

Anticipatory Set  (10 minutes)

  • The teacher will focus the students’ attention by placing a flamboyant hat on her head in front of the class.  She will ask them to tell her whose hat it is, requesting they be specific with their answers.  Follow up by asking how they’d respond if they didn’t know your name.  Record their responses on the board to review.  (Miss Speer’s hat, The teacher’s hat, The lady’s hat)
  • Place a second hat on your head and ask them to adjust their sentences.  (Miss Speer’s hats,   The teacher’s hats,  The lady’s hats)
  • Address the fact that the apostrophe didn’t change positions, nor were any added to the statement simply because the singular form of hat became hats.
  • Choose two girls from the class and place the hats on their heads.  Ask the students who possesses the hats now.  (The students’ hats,  The girls’ hats, The childrens' hats)

Procedure/Guided Practice  (35 minutes)

  • The teacher will distribute copies of the apostrophe poem sheet to each member of the class.  She will read it aloud, modeling appropriate voice fluctuation and reading rate while the class follows along:

The Apostrophe

Written by Susanne A. Speer 

Sometimes, I use an apostrophe when I write to show who owns what.
Now, does it go before the “s” or after?  Wait, now I’m stuck!
Let me think back on all knowledge I’ve gathered as a student...
I’m sure I’ve learned these rules at some point, and forget them, I just couldn’t!
Now I know apostrophes can show two meanings for almost any noun...
So, let’s think about when we use them and break this down somehow!
If I’m looking at a noun that’s singular and showing ownership,
I’ll place the mark before the “s”, and I’ll do it oh-so-quick!
Now if there’s more than one (which would make the noun plural),
I’ll place my mark after the “s”, or else I’ll be in trouble!
I knew it’d all come back to me if I gave it a little thought!
And guess what, I was right!
No need to get distraught!
 Now, let’s say I
take two words and squish them into one...
I’ll use the apostrophe sign to define the work that I’ve just done!
When this is the case, I’ll need to replace the letters I omit
With the sign to remind me I’m just too smart to quit!
Now when I do this squish technique, we call the new word a contraction.
Man! I feel so smart with all I’ve recalled…let’s put my skills in action!

  • They will review the chart on the bottom of the sheet and the examples listed within its’ boxes.  Make an effort to reference the rules within the poem and apply them to the examples given for additional reinforcement. (A larger master copy of the chart can be made and hung at the front of the room for the next portion of the lesson.)

 Possessives 

  • Jimmy’s house is new.
  • Sarah’s pen is blue.
  • Eric’s hands are cold.
  • Michelle’s necklace is beautiful
  • The cat’s food smells.
  • The smelly shoes are my brother’s.

 Contractions

The apostrophe acts as a squish mark to show where letters were pushed out.

  • do not becomes don’t
  • should not becomes shouldn’t
  • is not becomes isn’t
  • does not becomes doesn’t

 Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns never use an apostrophe.  

His phone - Whose phone is it? It’s his phone.  His would be the possessive pronoun.        

  • her mirror
  • my pillow
  • their grades 

SQUISH!

  • She’s smart.              (She is smart.)
  • He’s intelligent.   (He is intelligent.)
  • We’ll win.                   (We will win)
  • They’re leaving.   (They are leaving)
  • It’s far.                           (It is far)
  • I'm sleepy.                 (I am sleepy.)
  • Inform students that you are all going to play a game:
  • First, ask the class to take out their writing folders, a blank sheet of paper, and a pencil.   You may also choose to have students use a chapter book for this portion of the lesson (rather than their own writing samples).
  • Split the class into two groups, assigning one with possessives, and the other with contractions.
  • Tell them they will have two minutes to skim their own writing (or their chapter books) and to copy down as many examples as possible in correlation to whatever team they are on.  Ask them to be sure and include page numbers if referencing a book so they can look back and fully copy.
  • Ask students to take a minute and review their findings after the two minutes is up.  Walk around and answer any questions they may have while they work independently or quietly converse with a neighbor.
  • Pass out an index card to each student and have them write their most prized example down (in full sentence form).
  • Collect all the index cards, shuffle them, and redistribute.  Asking for volunteers first, have students read the card they were dealt aloud, followed by coming up to the master copy of the apostrophe chart and taping their example in the appropriate box. 
  • Discuss as needed.

Closure (5 minutes)

  • Have students take out their dry erase boards and model the appropriate apostrophe placement for the following: 

Fill in the apostrophe. 
·         The teachers pen is on her deskThe teacher’s pen is on her desk.
·         The boys jackets are on the ground.The boys’ jackets are on the ground.
Is this correctly written? 
·         Maria’s books are on the chair.Yes.
·         The ladies’ coats are fashionable. Yes.
·         The rascals and their practical jokes are driving me crazy!No; The rascal’s are driving me crazy with practical jokes.
·         Yall are goin to love the desert!No; Y’all are goin’ to love the dessert!
·         My parent’s bedroom has a giant television by the bed.My parents’ bedroom has a giant television by the bed.

Independent Practice

  • While they put up their marker boards and other items, collect their notes from the game and distribute copies of the “Possessive Nouns in Sentences” worksheet.  Have them begin this if time permits, otherwise inform them it is to be done at home. 

 Assessment 

  • Students will turn in their copies of notebook paper on which they took notes as they searched writing samples or chapter books for the teacher to critique. 
  • Their responses to the marker board practice will provide immediate feedback as to the level of individual comprehension.
  • Students will also be responsible for completing the possessive nouns in sentences worksheet (during class if time permits, otherwise for homework).   


Name: ____________________________________     Date: _________________           

The Apostrophe

Written by Susanne A. Speer 

Sometimes, I use an apostrophe when I write to show who owns what.
Now, does it go before the “s” or after?  Wait, now I’m stuck!
Let me think back on all knowledge I’ve gathered as a student...
I’m sure I’ve learned these rules at some point, and forget them, I just couldn’t!
Now I know apostrophes can show two meanings for almost any noun...
So, let’s think about when we use them and break this down somehow!
If I’m looking at a noun that’s singular and showing ownership,
I’ll place the mark before the “s”, and I’ll do it oh-so-quick!
Now if there’s more than one (which would make the noun plural),
I’ll place my mark after the “s”, or else I’ll be in trouble!
I knew it’d all come back to me if I gave it a little thought!
And guess what, I was right!
No need to get distraught!
 Now, let’s say I
take two words and squish them into one...
I’ll use the apostrophe sign to define the work that I’ve just done!
When this is the case, I’ll need to replace the letters I omit
With the sign to remind me I’m just too smart to quit!
Now when I do this squish technique, we call the new word a contraction.
Man! I feel so smart with all I’ve recalled…let’s put my skills in action!


 Possessives 

  • Jimmy’s house is new.
  • Sarah’s pen is blue.
  • Eric’s hands are cold.
  • Michelle’s necklace is beautiful
  • The cat’s food smells.
  • The smelly shoes are my brother’s.

 Contractions

The apostrophe acts as a squish mark to show where letters were pushed out.

  • do not becomes don’t
  • should not becomes shouldn’t
  • is not becomes isn’t
  • does not becomes doesn’t

 Possessive Pronouns

Possessive pronouns never use an apostrophe.  

His phone - Whose phone is it? It’s his phone.  His would be the possessive pronoun.        

  • her mirror
  • my pillow
  • their grades 

SQUISH!

  • She’s smart.              (She is smart.)
  • He’s intelligent.   (He is intelligent.)
  • We’ll win.                   (We will win)
  • They’re leaving.   (They are leaving)
  • It’s far.                           (It is far)
  • I'm sleepy.                 (I am sleepy.)
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