PAPER CRANES FOR JAPAN

After the recent devastating earthquake and Tsunami in Japan, students at Oasis Charter Middle School decided to take action. The students following the Japanese tradition of folding 1000 paper Cranes for wish granting have created over 2000 paper cranes. What started out as a small project has become a school wide effort that has even garnered the attention of the national network news.

Students in the Kiwanis sponsored Building Leaders club are spearheading the project. The students held a crane folding gathering for 6th graders last week that was video taped by a news crew sent from Katie Courics office, for inclusion in a nightly news broadcast.

After the news aired on our local FOX network last week, Barbara Misaki Reder, a viewer with family and friends affected by the disaster stopped by the school. She wanted to extend her thanks from her family touched by the disaster and our effort and to drop off a traditional Japanese Paper 1000 Crane kit. The students got to work feverishly making cranes and they now have over 2000 paper cranes hanging in the school hall ways and ringing the cafeteria. The students at Oasis Elementary have joined the effort also and many classes have made and hung their own cranes. Students also donated money to be sent to Japan.

The Dosomething.org organization has created along with studentsrebuild.org an opportunity for raising even more money. The Bezos Family Foundation will donate $2.00 per crane sent to them up to $200,000, toward rebuilding efforts in Japan. That means the students at Oasis Charter schools have raised over $4,000.00 to assist those in the affected areas.

This project is a true example of service learning and character building. According to Elisa Collins, 6th grade teacher and Building Leaders Club sponsor, “the students are doing this not for an external reward, but for the intrinsic one. The students understand the idea of doing something for others because it is the right thing to do.  It is also gratifying to see students working so diligently to create these small works of art.  Watching students help other learn the intricacies of this ancient art form.”

 For more info go to: www.studentsrebuild.com or www.dosomething.org