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DOLLHOUSE OF DEATH PROJECT







 

You have spent most of the past year learning about forensic science. You have had the opportunity to examine many types of evidence and to process mock crime scenes. Now you have the opportunity to synthesize and apply what you have learned to create your own miniature crime scene for future students to study.

The Task:

You will be working in a team that will consist of 3-5 members. Each member will be assigned one of the following roles:

  •  
    • Architect /Scene Planner ( 1-2 )

    • Model Builders ( 1-2 )

    • Reporter/Photographer ( 1 )

You will use the Internet to research actual crimes.

Using the role assigned to you, your group will work together to plan, design, and construct a 3-D crime scene miniature based on your research of the crime and the what you have learned about forensic evidence this year.

Your model may depict an actual crime scene, a composite of several different crime scenes, or a fictitious scene created from your imagination.

All members of the group will present the model to the class and be available to answer questions about the scene from the students and/or the teacher.

The Process:

1. Before you can construct a miniature crime scene, you must research actual crimes for inspiration. The scene you ultimately construct could be any type of crime, from any period. Your model may depict an actual crime scene, a composite of several different crime scenes, or a fictitious scene created from your imagination.
You should not limit your research to just the internet. You can and should use print resources for additional information. I will have several forensic textbooks and resource books available for use in the classroom. The library will also have books on reserve for us.


2. Decide who will assume which role for this project and inform the teacher.

Learning Advice:

Communication between all group members is VITAL to the success of this project!! Trade telephone numbers or email addresses if possible to help each other when not in class. While you will have time in class to do some research, it will not be possible to complete the entire project in class.

Help each other along during each phase of the project.
If there are any concerns at all, talk to the teacher as soon as possible.




Dollhouses of Death Project – Overview of Jobs


This is a group project for 3-5 people. Each member of the group should read the descriptions of the jobs and decide to whom each role will be assigned. Each person will be responsible for certain aspects of the project individually, but every member is ultimately responsible for the outcome of the project. Some of the jobs may overlap, and group members may wish to help on all aspects of the project. Make sure that you fully understand the requirements of each job, as you will be graded individually on the tasks outlined below.



  1. Architect/Scene Planner- This individual should enjoy drawing. He/she will be drawing the plans and scale drawing of the crime scene miniature onto a sheet of paper as a reference for the Builders. This individual will also decide the placement of evidence in the scene.

 


  1. The Model Builders- These two individuals will be constructing the actual model. These individuals should have access to each other after school and on weekends as needed to work on the model.


  1. The Reporter/Photographer- This individual should enjoy writing and photography. He/she will be responsible for keeping all members of the group on task, and recording the group’s progress. The reporter will also create a newspaper account of the crime depicted in the scene.

 


 


Step 1

Get with your group members and decide on a crime scene you wish to create. Decide what types of evidence you will use and how it will fit into the scene. Decide what materials you will use to create your scene.


For example, will you use all store-bought miniature pieces, will you make everything from scratch, or will you use a combination of bought & handmade items.


Have the REPORTER record all the information for this step and steps 2 & 3.

Step 2

The minimum requirement for your scene is TEN (10) DIFFERENT types of evidence.


For example, 3 bullets and 2 blood spatter patterns is only TWO different types of evidence. A dead body is only 1 type of evidence, even if you have 5 dead bodies.


AS THE SCENE PLANNER, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE THE FINAL CHOICES AS TO HOW THE EVIDENCE WILL BE REPRESENTED IN THE MODEL AND WHERE IT WILL BE PLACED. YOU WILL BE EVALUATED BASED ON THESE DECISIONS.

 

Step 3

Together, give your crime scene a name. Frances Glessner Lee used practical names such as “Pink Bathroom” or “Woodshed”. You may choose such a name, or you may wish to be more creative.


THIS PART OF THE PROCESS IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY. YOU HAVE THE FINAL SAY ON THE NAME.


Have the REPORTER record this information.

Step 4

As the SCENE PLANNER, it is your responsibility to decide the best placements for different parts of the model and the evidence.


For example, if you are recreating a bathroom scene, you would need things normally found in a bathroom—towels, toilet paper, toiletries, etc. Would you put the towel bar near the toilet or near the tub/sink?

Step 5

Make a rough sketch of your scene, including the placement of the 5 different types of evidence.


Once you have decided on placements of structures in the model, you will begin the final drawing of the scene. Make sure you include the scale, for example, 1 inch = 1 foot. Stick figures/outlines are fine.


Include EVERYTHING in your final drawing. It is the final drawing that the BUILDERS will use to construct the model. If it is not in your final drawing, it should not appear in your scene.


Requirements:

  1.  
    1. Rough sketch should be done on graph paper in pencil.

    2. A ruler must be used for all straight lines, and a compass can be used for circles.

    3. The final drawing should be done in pen or computer generated. The drawing must be neat and clean. Sloppiness will result in a loss of points.

       

 


Step 1

Get with your group members and decide on a crime scene and how it will be depicted.


It will ultimately be the ARCHITECT’S final decision on how the evidence is represented in the model.


Have the REPORTER record all the information for this step and steps 2 & 3.

Step 2

The minimum requirement for your scene is TEN (10) DIFFERENT types of evidence.


For example, 3 bullets and 2 blood spatter patterns is only TWO different types of evidence. A dead body is only 1 type of evidence, even if you have 5 dead bodies.


Discuss with your group what 10 types of evidence your scene will have, how it will be represented, and where it should be placed.

It will ultimately be the ARCHITECT’S final decision on how the evidence is represented in the model and where it should be placed.

 

Step 3

Together, give your crime scene a name. Frances Glessner Lee used practical names such as “Pink Bathroom” or “Woodshed”. You may choose such a name, or you may wish to be more creative.


The ARCHITECT will have the final decision on the name.


IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY AS THE BUILDER TO HAVE A “PLAQUE” WITH THE NAME OF YOUR SCENE, THE DATE, AND THE NAMES OF ALL GROUP MEMBERS INSTALLED SOMEWHERE ON THE SCENE.


Have the REPORTER record this information.

Step 4

As the BUILDER, you will decide which materials to use to represent the different structures in the scene.


For example, will you use all store-bought miniature pieces, will you make everything from scratch, or will you use a combination of bought & handmade items. Use your imagination and be creative!


Please do not use any real food products because they will spoil.


 

Step 5

As the BUILDER, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO CONSTRUCT THE 3-D CRIME SCENE MINIATURE. YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO BEGIN CONSTRUCTION UNTIL THE ARCHITECT/SCENE PLANNER HAS DONE HIS/HER JOB FIRST.


THE MODEL YOU BUILD SHOULD MATCH THE DRAWING BY THE ARCHITECT. IF IT’S NOT IN THE DRAWING, IT SHOULD NOT BE IN YOUR SCENE.


**It is important that the other BUILDER in your group be someone with whom you can work well. You will need access to each other after school and on weekends. The construction of the model will take place at one of your homes and the brought in no later than the due date.**

 


Requirements:

  1. Overall dimensions of your project should be no smaller than a shoebox and no larger than COPY BOX.

  2. The 3-D model must be built following the architect’s sketch.

  3. All structures, 5 different types of evidence, and extras needed to make the scene authentic must be included.





 


Step 1

Get with your group members and decide on a crime scene you wish to create. Decide what types of evidence you will use and how it will fit into the scene. Decide what materials you will use to create your scene.


For example, will you use all store-bought miniature pieces, will you make everything from scratch, or will you use a combination of bought & handmade items.


As the REPORTER, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO RECORD ALL THE INFORMATION FORM THIS STEP AND STEPS 2 AND 3!

Step 2

The minimum requirement for your scene is TEN (10) DIFFERENT types of evidence.


For example, 3 bullets and 2 blood spatter patterns is only TWO different types of evidence. A dead body is only 1 type of evidence, even if you have 5 dead bodies.


Discuss with your group what 10 types of evidence your scene will have, how it will be represented, and where it should be placed. The ACHITECT will have the final decision.

As the REPORTER, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO RECORD ALL THE INFORMATION FROM THIS STEP AND STEP 3!

Step 3

Together, give your crime scene a name. Frances Glessner Lee used practical names such as “Pink Bathroom” or “Woodshed”. You may choose such a name, or you may wish to be more creative.


As the REPORTER, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO RECORD THIS INFORMATION.

Step 4

Each day that your group works together, it will be YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO KEEP ALL MEMBERS ON TASK.


You will also keep a WRITTEN LOG ABOUT THE GROUP’S PROGRESS EACH TIME YOU MEET.

For example, what was discussed? What decisions were made? What deadlines were established? Who is supposed to do what? INCLUDE INFORMATION ABOUT INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS IN TERMS OF HOW MUCH THEY PARTICIPATED.

For example, was the work distributed evenly among the group? Did 1 or 2 people do all the work and everyone else just watched? Did someone promise to do something but fail to get it done? Be honest about how much you yourself contributed!


As the PHOTOGRAPHER, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE PICTURES OF THE GROUP’S PROGRESS. You may include photos of the meetings, sketches, raw materials, construction of the scene, etc. DIGITAL PHOTOS ARE PREFERRED, but are not required.

 

Step 5

As the REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER, YOU WILL ALSO BE RESPONSIBLE FOR CREATING A NEWSPAPER ACCOUNT OF THE SCENE.


Your report should include AT LEAST ONE PHOTO and include information on WHO DISCOVERED SCENE AND WHEN, FIRST RESPONDERS, VICTIMS, ANY SUSPECTS.


This may be done in Publisher or any other processing program that is available at school. It should NOT be hand written or drawn, and should be printed out. No emails or work on a disk accepted!

Requirements:

  1. Record ALL information for steps 1 through 3 above. It is a good idea to use a small spiral notebook or a project portfolio to keep all the papers together neatly.

  2. Each time that the group meets, whether in school or out, record information on the group’s progress and on each individual member’s contribution.

  3. Create and print a newspaper account for your scene.

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