Chapter 5 Notes

CHAPTER 5 NOTES:

ENG (Electronic News Gathering) Tips:

Always check the camcorder and recording equipment before going out on a story.

You should have several types of microphones (hand-held, lavalier, shotgun) for obtaining sound bites in various types of situations.

Always check your microphones before going to a story.

Bring several power sources.

Don't forget essentials: videotapes (if needed), tripod, headphones

Bring a light kit

Have a notepad & pen or pencil to take notes, write down how a person's name is spelled, etc..
.

Newsroom positions:

News Director - In charge of news department including anchors, reporters, assignment editors, producers, videographers, etc...

Assignment editor - Stays up to date on news events, monitors police scanners, assigns a crew to cover a story.

Producer - Works in the newsroom selecting and writing stories to be included in the news broadcast.

Reporter - Writes, investigates and presents news stories.

Videographer - Shoots the images with a video camera (analog or digital) then edits the footage so it can be presented on the news.

CHAPTER 5 VOCABULARY WORDS:

ENG - Electronic news gathering. Refers to the process of reporting events and activities that occur outside of the television studio.

lead-in - The first few sentences of script that establish the setting and events of a news story. Introduces the ENG topic to the viewer.

Rule of Threes - During postproduction, the edited clips are grouped by audio and video into segments of three sentences per style or format.

sound bite - A videotaped segment in which the audio and video portions of the tape must remain in sync. Sound bites are usually three to five seconds in length and should be no longer than 15 seconds.

stand up - Refers to an on-camera shot of a reporter as he or she presents information about the topic.

tag - A standard format for the final sentence of script ending an ENG report. Identifies the reporter (by name) and station affiliation.

voice over (VO) - When the reporter's voice is heard, but the reporter is not seen on camera.

VO/SOT - A story read by a news anchor, which has the anchor voicing over a script while video is playing then leads in to a pre-recorded sound bite.

 

An ENG news report is a story and should have a beginning, middle and end.

The Rule of Threes is a postproduction technique or formula that says audio and video segments should be grouped in threes.

Examples:

Lead-in (Reporter stand up) = Three sentences

Reporter Narration over video = Three sentences

Interview1 = Three sentences or comments

Interview2 = Three sentences or comments

Closing tag = Three sentences plus the closing tag. (Closing tag should say "For Iguana 5 News, I'm Joe")

 

Lead-in (Reporter stand up) = Three sentences

Interview1 = Three sentences or comments

Reporter Narration over video = Three sentences

Interview2 = Three sentences or comments

Closing tag = Three sentences plus the closing tag. (Closing tag should say "For Iguana 5 News, I'm Joe")

 

Lead-in (Reporter stand up) = Three sentences

Interview1 = Three sentences or comments

Interview2 = Three sentences or comments

Reporter Narration over video = Three sentences

Closing tag = Three sentences plus the closing tag. (Closing tag should say "For Iguana 5 News, I'm Joe")

 

Postproduction Tips for ENG Reports:

1. Complexity is essential for maintaining viewer interest and attention. Use camera angles and shots that portray the drama associated with the event. Avoid long pans and long wide angle shots that leave out detail. Use two to three seconds of a shot.

2. Use graphics superimposed over video to identify the reporter or person being interviewed on camera. Identify person by name and title. These title graphics should remain on the screen long enough to read. (Three to five seconds.)

Examples: Joe Smith/School Librarian

Emily/Iguana 5 News Reporter

3. Use as much live sound/natural sound from the event for background under the narration or put it up as natural sound for a few seconds to give the viewer a better feel for what is going on.

4. Watch your completed video with a critical eye. What other editing can you do to make it better?

5. Stay within the 60 to 90 second time frame.