Assessment

 

  Assessment


                                                                      


Assessment of students' work and progress will be done on an on-going basis.

“The English Language Arts curriculum engages students in a range of experiences and interactions with a variety of texts designed to help them develop increasing control over language processes, use and respond to language effectively and purposefully, and understand why language and literacy are so central to their lives.” (from Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum: Grades 7-9, 1998 p.5)

General Curriculum Outcomes:

Students will be expected to:

Speaking and Listening

  • speak and listen to explore, extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences.
  • communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and critically.
  • interact with sensitivity and respect, considering the situation, audience, and purpose.

Reading and Viewing

  • to select, read, and view with understanding a range of literature, information, media, and visual texts
  • interpret, select, and combine information using a variety of strategies, resources, and technologies.
  • respond personally to a range of texts.
  • respond critically to a range of texts, applying their understanding of language, form, and genre.

Writing and Other Ways of Representing

  • use writing and other ways of representing to explore, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learning; and to use their imagination.
  • create texts collaboratively and independently, using a variety of forms for a range of audiences and purposes.
  • use a range of strategies to develop effective writing and other ways of representing and to enhance their clarity, precision, and effectiveness.

All major assignments are evaluated based on criteria outlined on a rubric. A rubric will be introduced prior to the distribution and commencement of each assignments to ensure that students' are well aware of what’s expected and required of them and how their work will be graded. The focus of the grading will be evaluation of what outcomes are met and which will require further demonstration of the skill(s) in future attempts. An example of a rubric is below:
 

Short Story Writing Rubric

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Organization

The story is very well organized. One idea or scene follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions.

The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used.

The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are sometimes not clear.

Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.

Introduction

First paragraph has a "grabber" or catchy beginning.

First paragraph has a weak "grabber".

A catchy beginning was attempted but was confusing rather than catchy.

No attempt was made to catch the reader's attention in the first paragraph.

Setting

Many vivid, descriptive words are used to tell when and where the story took place.

Some vivid, descriptive words are used to tell the audience when and where the story took place.

The reader can figure out when and where the story took place, but the author didn’t supply much detail.

The reader has trouble figuring out when and where the story took place.

Characters

The main characters are named and clearly described in text as well as pictures. Most readers could describe the characters accurately.

The main characters are named and described. Most readers would have some idea of what the characters looked like.

The main characters are named. The reader knows very little about the characters.

It is hard to tell who the main characters are.

Problem/Conflict

It is very easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem.

It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem.

It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face but it is not clear why it is a problem.

It is not clear what problem the main characters face.

Solution/Resolution

The solution to the character\'s problem is easy to understand, and is logical. There are no loose ends.

The solution to the character's problem is easy to understand, and is somewhat logical.

The solution to the character\'s problem is a little hard to understand.

No solution is attempted or it is impossible to understand.

Spelling and Punctuation

There are no spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. Character and place names that the author invented are spelled consistently throughout.

There is one spelling or punctuation error in the final draft.

There are 2-3 spelling and punctuation errors in the final draft.

The final draft has more than 3 spelling and punctuation errors.

Creativity

The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination.

The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his imagination.

The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination.

There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination