Social Studies Lesson Plans

 

HSA3 Second Grade Social Studies

Week: 1, Unit: Needs and Wants Lessons 1-2

 

Monday

8/24/09

Thursday

8/27/09

Lesson 1

 

Teaching Points: Today in S.S. we will learn about urban, suburban and rural communities

 

By: looking at building types, transportation and relative locations.

Lesson 2

 

Teaching Points: Today we will learn about rural communities

 

By: looking at population sizes, pop. density, space distribution, buildings, transportation and location. 

Focus Points

-Identify urban, suburban and rural characteristics.

-Distinguish between rural, urban & suburban. 

-Identify building types and transportation in urban, suburban and rural communities. 

 

Vocabulary

urban, suburban, rural, transportation, skyscraper, city, country, outer city, small town

Focus Points

-Identify and describe characteristics of rural communities.

-Write about suburban communities. 

-Support opinions with fact in your writing.

 

Vocabulary

rural, urban, country, population, population density, farmland, deserts, prairie’s, woodland forests and plains

Materials

-Notebook file

-Post its

-Baggies with picture cutouts of 3 community types

Materials

-Notebook file

-Letter templates

-Shared reading

-Pictures

Routines/Procedures to teach—Whole group

 

Introduce freeze clap & practice once.

 

Remind students that last year they discussed individual and family needs and wants.  Explain to students that they will engage in a TPS and to get their attention at the end I will count down from 3-0 clapping twice after each # except 0 where I’ll display zero noise sign and they should be magic 5).  Practice once.  T-P-S: Come up w/ 1 need and 1 want.  3-0 count down, magic sticks for share. 

 

Explain to students that just like individuals and families have different needs and wants, communities have different needs and wants too.  Tell them that before we learn the needs and wants of communities we have to learn what different communities look like.

 

Bulls Eye: Give each student a post it with their name on it.  Tell them you will wait until they put the post its on their laps. Tell students to imagine the coolest, most fun city and then describe it to their partner.  Introduce urban and remind them that cities are urban communities like NYC.  3-0 count down. Ask partnerships to share as you record answers on a circle on the board. Ask them to raise post its if they would like to live in this city and have those scholars place their post its in the circle as you call their rows. Point out how crowded it gets.  Draw an outer circle to introduce suburb and discuss that they are outer cities.  Ask them to raise hands if they would like to live in suburbs and move post it’s accordingly.  To introduce rural, ask scholars to raise hands if they prefer to live somewhere quiet with open spaces instead of the city, move those post its and introduce rural.  

 

Discuss types of buildings and transportation in urban, suburban & rural.  Ask what they know about each and record on chart.  Hand-raising to share. They will need support with suburban as this is new to them. Explain/Model Activity—show photos on screen and ask thumbs up if U, S, or R.

Explain that they will work in table teams to sort pictures into 3 piles of U, S & R. Demonstrate silent, whisper, restaurant and loud voices.  Explain that appropriate noise level for group work is restaurant voice.

 

Ask class: “someone raise hand and tell the class what we should do when we have a question during independent work.” Teacher will explain that they ask 3 neighbors before me and then raise hand to get my attention.

 

Practice 1-get ready 2-stand up 3-to your seats.  Ask one S.S. super scholar to demonstrate then ask that student to place worksheets on e/ desk. Then send row by row. 

 

Routines/Procedures to teach—Whole group

 

Elicit class attention w/ freeze clap.  Tell them that today we are going to take a closer look at one of the three community types we learned about yesterday: rural.  Ask them to what they remember about rural communities.  Mention building types and transportation to jog their memories. Hand raise to share.  Record their responses. 

 

Ask a student to define population (Hand raise). If they can’t define, define population & population density for them (definitions on nb file). Tell them that we will learn about the population and pop. density of rural communities. 

 

Tell students that we will engage in a shared reading and they should read in loud clear voices. Shared reading about rural characteristics. Guide discussion about the reading.  When discussing the part about rural as not just farmland, show pictures of deserts, prairie’s, woodland forests and plains.  Ask students to turn and talk about how they would feel if they had to move to a rural community. 3-0 count down.

 

Tell students to imagine that their parents told them they were moving to the country. Ask them to turn and talk about how they would feel if they had to move to a rural community. Do they agree or disagree with their parent’s decision? 3-0 count down. Tell them that at their seats they will write a letter to their parents explaining why they should or shouldn’t move to a rural community.  Explain that they have to support their choice with reasons for why they should or shouldn’t move.  Ask them if they think it is enough to simply write “I don’t because its boring and there is nothing to do” or “Yes because I can run around”.  Explain that they have to include facts: “Yes because the country is quiet and has large open fields.”  Ask how they should start a letter (date and “Dear ___”). Ask how they should end their letters.   

 

Tell students that since they are working independently to write these letters to their parents, the appropriate noise level is silent. Ask a S.S. super scholar to from each table to hand out the materials to their tables. Row by row say, 1-get ready 2-stand up 3-to your seats.    

Routines/Procedures to teach—Independent work

 

When all scholars are at seats use freeze clap to get their attention.   Say, “someone raise hand and tell the class what we should do when we have a question during independent work.” Explain that without leaving their seats, they should ask 3 neighbors before me and then raise hand to get my attention.

 

Teach learning clap and practice until they are ready.  Give tables that are ready their pictures to begin sorting.   

 

Walk around to observe teamwork and listen to conversation. Use learning clap once to publicly comment on or praise teamwork.

 

Use freeze clap to announce clean up. Tell scholars that expectations for clean up are cleared desks except for the three piles, chairs pushed in and students are back at rug spots showing magic 5 in 15 seconds).  Begin count down from 15.  

 

Routines/Procedures to teach—Independent work

 

Walk around observing scholar work and meeting with students. 

Use learning clap to elicit attention and publicly comment on student work/behavior 1-2 times.

 

Use freeze clap to announce clean up. Tell scholars that expectations for clean up are cleared desks, chairs pushed in and students are back at rug spots with their letters showing magic 5 in 10 seconds).  Begin count down from 10.  

 

Wrap up

 

Walk around room reviewing their piles as they track you from the rug. Point out interesting findings and cold call on team members from e/ table to talk about their piles. Ask questions like, “why did you place this here?”

Wrap up

 

Use magic sticks to choose 3 students to read their letters.  Ask students to touch heads if they wanted to move to rural and touch ears of they didn’t want to move.  Collect letters.    

 Formative Assessment

Oral responses, observation, sorting activity.

 

 Formative Assessment

Oral responses, turn & talk observations,

student letters.

 

 

 

HSA3 Second Grade Social Studies

Week: 2, Unit: Needs and Wants Lessons 3-4

 

Monday

8/31/09

Thursday

9/3/09

Lesson 3

 

Teaching Points: Today we will learn about rural communities

 

By: looking at their population sizes, pop. density, space distribution, buildings, transportation and location. 

Lesson 4

 

Teaching Points: Today we will review rural communities and learn about urban and suburban communities

 

By: looking at their

population sizes, pop. density, space distribution, buildings, transportation and locations.

Focus Points

-Identify and describe characteristics of rural communities.

-Write about suburban communities. 

-Support opinions with fact in writing.

 

 

Vocabulary

rural, urban, country, population, population density, farmland, deserts, prairie’s, woodland forests, safari and mountains.

Focus Points

-Are students able to identify and describe the population, density, buildings, transportation and space distribution in rural, urban and suburban communities.

-Students are able to distinguish between characteristics of all three community types. 

 

 

Vocabulary

Rural, urban, suburban, population, population density, mass transit

Materials

-Notebook file

-Letter writing paper

-Shared reading

 

Materials

-NB file

-R, U, S video

-Chart paper with U, S or R on top

-different colored markers

-tape

Whole group

 

Tell scholars that today we are going to take a closer look at one of the three community types we learned about yesterday: rural.  Ask them to what they remember about rural communities.  Mention building types and transportation to jog their memories. Hand raise to share.  Record their responses. 

 

Ask them to raise their hand if they know or think they know what population means.  Have them turn and talk and then use magic sticks to get some responses.  Record on board and then discuss population density.  Show the definitions of population and population density.   Demonstrate population density by asking one scholar to stand in a body box and then 3-4 to safely stand in a body box.   Tell them that today we will learn about the population and pop. density of rural communities. 

 

Tell students that we will engage in a shared reading and they should read in loud clear voices. Shared reading about rural characteristics. Guide discussion about the reading.  When discussing the part about rural as not just farmland, show slides of farmland, deserts, prairies, woodland forests mountains and safaris.   

Fill out the population and population density of rural communities on the chart.

 

Tell students to imagine that their parents told them they were moving to a rural community. Ask them to turn and talk about how they would feel about moving to a rural community. Do they agree or disagree with their parent’s decision?  Why? 3-0 count down. Tell them that at their seats they will write a letter to their parents explaining why they should or shouldn’t move to a rural community.  Explain that they have to support their choice with reasons for why they should or shouldn’t move.  Ask them if they think it is enough to simply write “I don’t because its boring and there is nothing to do” or “Yes because I can run around”.  Explain that they have to include facts: “Yes because the country is quiet and has large open fields since buildings are far apart.”  Ask them to be specific; if they would like to move to a rural community, they should write which kind of rural community they want to move to.  Quickly show letter template to review how to start and end a letter

Appripriate noise level for independent work is silent.  Use magic sticks to choose a paper passer.  1-get ready 2-stand up 3-to your seats.      

Whole group

 

Introduce and show Urban, suburban and rural video.  Stop the video to discuss certain characteristics or make clarification.  TPS-Ask scholars what they know about urban communities based on the last three lessons, living in an urban community and the video. Record their responses on SMARTboard.  Repeat with suburban communities. Have them read the definitions of population and population density with you as a refresher. Show picture of high population density (crowded city street) and low population density (3 people in open space).   

 

Display slides with urban and suburban photos.  With the class, fill in the population and population density of urban and suburban communities.  

 

Explain that each table will be assigned a community type that they will have to describe.  Assign one recorder who will write their table’s ideas on chart paper.  Explain that when you do a freeze clap, they will stop, rotate, read the next tables chart and the recorder will make any additions. 

 

1-get ready 2-stand up 3-to your seats.       

Independent work

 

Walk around observing scholar work and meeting with students. 

Learning clap to comment on work.

Freeze clap to announce clean up. 10 second countdown.

Independent work

 

Each table will be assigned urban, suburban or rural and provided with chart paper and one marker. They will brainstorm the characteristics of that community and the recorder will write them down.  When the teacher asks them to rotate they will move to the next table and read the chart.  They will decide if the other charts are missing anything and the recorder will add them to the other teams’ charts. 

Wrap up

 

Have students read their letter to their neighbors.  Use magic sticks to choose 1-2 students to read their letters.  Ask students to touch heads if they wanted to move to rural and touch ears of they didn’t want to move.  Collect letters.    

Wrap up

 

Students will come to the rug to view all of the charts and discuss.  The teacher will add anything they think is missing. 

 Formative Assessment

Oral responses, turn & talk observation,

letters.

 Formative Assessment

Oral responses, observation, charts. 

 

 

 

 

HSA3 Second Grade Social Studies

Week: 2, Unit: Needs and Wants Lessons 5-6

 

Friday

9/11/09

Friday

9/18/09

Lesson 5

 

Teaching Points: Today we will learn about natural vs. man-made items

 

 

 

 

By: defining them, looking at their characteristics and determining if they came from the environment or from man. 

Lesson 6

 

Teaching Points: Today we will learn why it is important to take care of our planet

 

 

 

By: learning about natural resources and learning how we can help protect the environment. 

 

Focus Points

-Students are able to differentiate things that are from nature and things that are made by people. 

-Students will be able to identify that many things we use are from nature or are made out of natural materials.

 

Vocabulary

Natural, man-made, environment.

Focus Points

-Students will understand what natural resources are and why they are important.

-Students will understand that most natural resources come from rural communities.

-Students will understand at least 3 ways that they can help protect their planet. 

 

Vocabulary

Environment, natural resources

Materials

-Notebook file

-Natural vs. Man-made worksheet

 

Materials

-NB file

-clipboards & worksheets

-chart paper

Whole group

 

Tell scholars to imagine that an alien wanted to visit our planet, but wanted to know what to expect first.  The alien wants us to make a list of all the things he will see on earth.  Tell them you started the list and read it to them; have them t-p-s and then add to the list. Record their responses.  Introduce the concept natural vs. man-made.  Define the two and then spend some time deciding which items from the list are natural and which are made by man. When defining natural, be sure to explain what the word “environment” means.  Circle the natural items in green.  You can have kids come up to circle items. 

 

Show scholars the slide with wood and a chair.  Explain that wood is natural, but man has used it to make chairs.  Repeat with the picture of milk and ice cream.  Explain that so many man-made things are made out of natural materials.   

 

Display the Natural vs. man-made T-chart and ask scholars to help you list a few more under each category.  Use a t-p-s and then take 2-3 answers for each side of chart.  Show them the worksheet and have them help you list 1-2 items before they work on it at their seats. 

 

Appropriate noise level for partner work is whisper.

Whole group

 

Ask students what planet we live on.  Magic stick to choose a scholar with their hand up.  T-P-S Ask scholars why they think it is important to take care of our planet.  Tell them you are thinking of where paper, oxygen and some food comes from, ask them to guess what you are thinking of--choral response.  Ask them where water comes from.  Ask if they think such things are mostly in urban or rural communities.  Explain what a natural resource is and tell them that most natural resources come from rural areas.  Again show definitions of environment and natural resource.  Go over some examples of natural resources and discuss their importance.  

 

Tell students you will ask 2 questions, but you want them to whisper answers to their hands before you ask for a response.  1-Are natural resources natural or man-made?  Ask a scholar to explain why.  2-Are natural resources needs or wants? 

 

 

Explain that students will watch a video and answer trivia questions on a worksheet as they watch.  Hand out clipboards with trivia worksheet & pencils.  Give students a few minutes to review questions and then play video.  Stop the video to discuss/emphasize points from the worksheet.  After video, send students to their tables to work in groups.           

Independent work

 

Walk around observing scholar work and meeting with students.  Stop to address difficult materials/items such as fire, tea, etc.

 

Independent work

Students should work together to check the answers on their trivia worksheets. 

 

 

Wrap up

 

Go over the entire list with students at the rug.  Invite students who came up with additional items to share out.      

Wrap up

 

We will share trivia answers and then make a list of ways we can help protect our planet. 

 Formative Assessment

Oral responses, think-pair-share,

worksheets.

 Formative Assessment

Worksheets, t-p-s, chart, oral responses, observation

 

 

 

HSA3 Second Grade Social Studies

Week: 4, Unit: Needs and Wants Lessons 7-8

 

Monday

9/21/09

Friday

9/25/09

Lesson 7

 

Teaching Points: Today we will learn about the effects of pollution and deforestation on the environment 

 

 

 

By: reading “The Lorax” by Dr. Seuss. 

Lesson 8

 

Teaching Points: Today we will learn how we can take care of the environment in NYC

 

 

 

By: by exploring the 3 R’s: reducing, reusing & recycling.     

Focus Points

-Students will understand how pollution affects the natural environment. 

 

 

 

Vocabulary

deforestation, pollution (air, land & water), environment.

Focus Points

-Students will understand the terms reduce, reuse & recycle.

- Students will differentiate between the terms reduce, reuse & recycle.

- Students will document their own ideas for using the 3 R's with respect to simple objects.

-Students will understand the need for waste management. 

 

Vocabulary

Environment, reduce, reuse, recycle, landfill

Materials

-Notebook file

-The Lorax by Dr. Seuss

-Letter writing paper

 

Materials

-NB file

-video

-worksheets

-materials for RRR

-Stony Brook water reusable bottle

Whole group

 

Tell the class we are going to take a deeper look at pollution and its effects on the environment by reading The Lorax.  Begin read aloud.  Stop to ask questions and initiate discussion.  You don’t have to ask all questions below, but can choose some for talking points.   

 

P. 12 "What do you think happened to the green grass, the pond and the clean clouds?" T-P-S

 

P, 18 "Do you think the Once-ler is going to chop more trees down?  Is that good or bad for the environment?  Why?"  Discuss deforestation and its implications. 

 

P. 24 "Is a Thneed a need or a want?  Do we need a lot of Thneeds or just enough to keep us warm?" 

   

P. 24 "Is a Thneed a need or a want?  Do we need a lot of Thneeds or just enough to keep us warm?"

 

P. 35 "What happened to the Barbaloots?

 

P. 39 "Does everyone NEED money?  Does everyone need so much money?"

 

P. 40 "What do you think will happen to the Swans and other animals living in the pond?"

 

P. 50 "They chopped down the last Truffula tree.  What do you think will happen now? Can people continue to live in that environment?'

 

P.48  What can we do to protect our environment as the Once-ler suggests?

 

T-P-S Ask students why we shouldn’t pollute and record some of their answers.  Tell students they will pretend to be the Lorax and write a letter to the Once-ler about why he shouldn’t pollute and what he can do to prevent it.  Show letter format and quickly discuss with students.  Noise level zero.

Whole group

 

Ask the children if they know what happens to garbage after they put it in the garbage can. Write their thoughts on the SMARTboard. Explain to the children that garbage goes to a garbage dump (landfill) and that once one landfill gets full room for another one must be found.  Tell them to imagine if they replaced playgrounds, parks, etc. with landfills.  Ask students how they could help prevent this from happening.  Introduce the 3 R’s and explain examples.  Show the “New Adventures of Binman” video.  TPS: Ask students to name some items they could reuse and then some items they could recycle.  Have them explain how they will reuse the items they mention.  Explain that by reusing and recycling, we are reducing trash.

 

Explain that students will think of ways to reduce trash, things they could reuse and things they could recycle and they will use the Reuse & Recycle Sheet to record their ideas.  If it isn’t already clear, give an example of each before you send them off.  (Another FUN option is bringing in materials, i.e., aluminum, paper, plastic, cans, etc. and having them decide what is recyclable and what is reusable—you can have the items upfront for them to look at or pictures on the smart board-let me know).

 

 

Independent work

 

Walk around observing scholar work and discuss their writing.

Independent work

 

Observe and assist scholars as they work on Reuse & Recycle worksheet independently.  Make sure they write how they could reuse the reusable items.

 

 

Wrap up

 

Have scholars read their letters to their neighbors.  If time permits, have 1 or 2 scholars read their letters to class.        

Wrap up

 

During the last 5 minutes they should share with their neighbor and jot down any ideas they did not come up with.

 

 Formative Assessment

Oral responses, think-pair-share,

letters.

 Formative Assessment

Worksheets, t-p-s, oral responses, observation