Social Studies is AWESOME

Title: Rome & Christianity

Integration with other content areas: Language Arts

Estimated time for implementation: 2 weeks

7th Grade Social Studies

Standards Addressed in this Unit:

Program of Studies:

Understandings

Program of Studies:

Skills and Concepts

Related Core Content

SS-7-GC-U-3

Students will understand that individual rights in world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. varied under different forms of government.

SS-7-CS-U-2

Students will understand that cultures develop social institutions (e.g., government, economy, education, religion, family) to structure society, influence behavior and respond to human needs.

SS-7-HP-U-2

Students will understand that world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. can be examined in order to develop chronological understanding, recognize cause-effect relationships, and interpret historical events

SS-7-HP-U-4

Students will understand that advances in science and technology had a significant impact on historical events in world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

EL-7-WC-U-2

Students will understand that different forms of writing are appropriate for different purposes and audiences across the content areas and have different features

SS-7-GC-S-3

Students will analyze information from a variety of print and non-print sources (e.g., books, documents, articles, observations, interviews, Internet sources) to research, explain and answer questions about governments and people of world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-7-HP-S-1

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interpretative nature of history using a variety of tools and resources (e.g., primary and secondary sources, Internet, timelines, maps):

a) examine multiple cause and effect relationships that have shaped history throughout world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-7-CS-S-4

Students will describe conflicts between individuals or groups and explain how compromise and cooperation were possible choices to resolve conflict among individuals and groups in world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-7-CS-S-5

Students will compare examples of cultural elements (e.g., beliefs, customs/traditions, language, skills, the arts, literature) using information from a variety of print and non-print sources (e.g., media, literature, interviews, observations, documentaries, artifacts) to analyze how cultures in world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. have influenced cultures of today

EL-7-WP-S-2

Students will prewrite-

Generate ideas to support and develop controlling idea.

SS-07-2.3.2

Students will explain how compromise and cooperation were possible choices to resolve conflict among individuals and groups in early civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-07-4.3.2

Students will explain why and give examples of how human populations changed and/or migrated because of factors such as war, disease, economic opportunity and technology in early civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-07-5.3.2

Students will describe the rise of classical civilizations and empires (Greece and Rome) and explain how these civilizations had lasting impacts on the world in government, philosophy, architecture, art, drama and literature.

WR-07-1.2.3

In Transactive Writing,

Students will incorporate persuasive techniques when appropriate (e.g., expert opinion emotional/logical/ethical appeal, repetition, rhetorical question) or propaganda techniques (e.g., testimonial, bandwagon) when appropriate.

WR-M-4.8.0

Prewriting,

Generating ideas (e.g., reading, journaling, mapping, webbing, note-taking, interviewing, researching, other writing-to-learn activities)

   

 

Interdisciplinary, Meaningful and Authentic Connections

Students need to understand that form of government structures the society it governs, which will be visible from studying the Roman Republic and then continuing to the Roman Empire. As the Roman Republic transformed to the Roman Empire the social institutions changed or were developed in order to structure the transforming society. The chronological examination of Rome will enable students to see the cause and effect relationships that built what is now the history of the Roman Empire. Students will have the opportunity to try to find a solution to the problems that the Romans encountered, a little late, but give a try at saving the Roman Empire. SS-7-GC-U-3, SS-7-CS-U-2, SS-7-HP-U-2, SS-7-GC-S-3, SS-7-HP-S-1, SS-07-2.3.2, SS-07-4.3.2, SS-7-CS-S-4

Roman accomplishments can readily been seen in our society today. This unit will hopefully cause students to think more in-depth of the buildings they pass, the art that encompasses their lives, the laws they may take for granted, or the roads that lead to their homes. History is alive because it is rooted in everything encountered in daily life. Students will be able to connect the accomplishments of the Romans to their own community as a result of this unit. SS-07-5.3.2, SS-7-HP-U-4, SS-7-CS-S-5

Within this unit students will start the writing of a speech which will include pre-writing and the use of audience grabbing techniques. Students will also work on the speech in their Language Arts classroom. By working on their speech in both classes students will be able to make use of skills and receive guidance from their Language Arts and Social Studies classes for the same assignment. Students will be able to see that what is taught in one class can also be used in another. EL-7-WC-U-2, EL-7-WP-S-2, WR-07-1.2.3, WR-M-4.8.0

CONTEXT

Realistic Issues or Problems. Students are not expected to enjoy all of their subjects at school. I realize that some students may not have genuine interest in Rome and Christianity. A realistic issue or problem that I might be faced with during this unit is engaging students who are uninterested. I believe that the instructional strategies incorporated throughout this lesson will be beneficial at energizing students and keeping them interested. A lot of the lessons within this unit are student-led and permit the students to speak and move freely throughout the room, which will meet the needs of the different types of learners in the classroom.

Connects learning to prior knowledge, experiences, skills, beliefs, customs.

Students will build upon prior knowledge of the Roman Republic which was taught in during the previous unit. Students will gain a more in-depth knowledge of Roman life and the reasons which contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire. The lessons within this unit will require students to use skills that have been developed in other units, such as group work, developing lessons to teach their peers, Socratic Circles, and skits.

Goals and objectives will engage students.

The goals and objectives of this unit will engage students because students will be able to see a connection of the daily lessons to their daily lives. I will push for the students’ understanding that the gaining of knowledge of the history of Rome and Christianity is of value to them. Students will understand that the problems that the Roman Empire encountered are visible in societies today. I will attempt to appeal to the different learning styles of the students in the class by having group and individual work. Students will at times be able to move throughout the room when needed. I will not be the only teacher in the room; students will also be expected to teach their peers what they have learned from the examination of their assigned topics. Students will be grouped by interest if possible.

Assessments:

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

 

1

 

1

 

Formative

Bell Ringer

 

1

2

Formative

Frame G.O.

Neo2, extra help

2

3

Formative

Exit Card

 

2

4

Formative

Completion of group assignment

Group assignment

3

5

Formative

Student lessons taught

 

3

6

Formative

Homework

 

3

7

Formative

Homework

 

4

8

Formative

Timeline Created

More time, extra help

4

9

Formative

Word Wall

Peer Help

5

10

Formative

Outline Completed

 

5

11

Formative

Lead Paragraph

 

6

12

Formative

One Sentence Main Idea

More time, peer help

6

13

Formative

Answers to guided questions

 

6

14

Formative

Socractic Circle

Assistance, cues

7

15

Formative

Exit Card

 

7

16

Formative

Exit Card

 

8

17

Formative

Group Skit

More Time

8

18

Formative

Group Skit

Extra Help

9

19

Formative

Graphic Organizer

Neo2

10

20

Summative

Unit Test

 

Essential Question: Strength to demise, is Rome still alive?

1. How can Roman accomplishments be seen in our lives today?

2. What led to the demise of the Roman Empire?

3. Persecution and freedom of religion, can both occur at the same time?

Resources/Technology:

Internet access

Laptops

Teacher computer

Projector

Projection screen

Smart Board

Dry erase board with markers

Student notebooks

Exit cards

Construction paper

Markers

Scissors

Worksheets

Printer

Video- Discovery, Civilizations: Fall of Power

Text book- World History, Holt.

 

Outline of Daily Lessons:

Lesson 1

Objectives: Students will identify the main ideas of the unit.

Students will identify four word wall vocabulary words.

Connection to Standards:

SS-7-GC-U-3

Students will understand that individual rights in world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. varied under different forms of government.

SS-7-HP-U-2

Students will understand that world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. can be examined in order to develop chronological understanding, recognize cause-effect relationships, and interpret historical events

Procedures

Bell Ringer- Students scan through their text book and find four words and their definitions they would like to add to the Word Wall. (10 min)

Group discussion of the words and their meaning (8 min)

We choose, as a group, four words to add to the wall. (2 min)

Enrichment Activities- The list of four words will be placed on the back Enrichment Activity table and students can create colorful word signs with definitions on back to be placed on the wall. Students will also be given the opportunity to suggest during reading activities to be used in class. Design a coin for Caesar. Include two aspects that commemorate the life or achievements of Caesar.

Review of unit big ideas. The difference between a republic and empire will be explained to students. Students are given a Frame graphic organizer to list each section of the chapter and to put in their binder when complete. We will also complete a Frame with the use of the Smart Board. During lecture/conversation, students are able to freely walk up and add something they believe is worthy of the Frame. (35 min)

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

 

1

 

1

 

Formative

Bell Ringer

 

1

2

Formative

Frame G.O.

Neo2, extra help

Lesson 2

Objectives: Students will contribute to their group.

Students will create a lesson for their peers.

Connection to Standards:

SS-7-HP-U-2

Students will understand that world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. can be examined in order to develop chronological understanding, recognize cause-effect relationships, and interpret historical events

SS-7-GC-S-3

Students will analyze information from a variety of print and non-print sources (e.g., books, documents, articles, observations, interviews, Internet sources) to research, explain and answer questions about governments and people of world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-07-4.3.2

Students will explain why and give examples of how human populations changed and/or migrated because of factors such as war, disease, economic opportunity and technology in early civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

Procedures

Class divided into five groups. Each group will be assigned a section of section one (of their text book: World History) to become an expert of topic and teach to the class. Each group will have use of two laptops, their textbooks, and will also be assigned guiding questions they will need to answer and incorporate into their lesson. Groups will be expected to create some type of visual and given examples for ideas. It will be explained to students that the largest percentage of their grade will be their contributions to the group.

Group 1: Disorder in the Republic – Calls for Change.

Who was Cicero?

Identify and describe the problems that plagued Rome in the 70s B.C.

How might Cicero have been more successful in his efforts to improve Rome?

Group 2: Caesar’s Rise to Power

Who was Caesar? (Identify the lands he conquered, the books he wrote)

Identify the position Caesar 1st held in government.

Explain the leadership qualities of Julius Caesar.

Identify Caesar’s alliances.

Group 3: Challenges to Caesar

Identify Caesar’s challenges.

Impact today- People today use the phrase "crossing the Rubicon," explain its meaning in relation to Caesar.

Why did Caesar cross the Rubicon with his army?

Caesar did what to Pompey?

Identify the role Caesar gave himself.

Why was Caesar killed?

How did most Roman’s feel about Caesar’s death?

Group 4: The End of the Republic

Who emerged to take control of Roman politics?

Explain what happened to Caesar’s assassins.

Identify the main components and importance of Marc Antony’s speech.

Why did Octavian turn against Marc Antony?

Which resulted in?

Who is Augustus?

Identify why the naming of Augustus is considered the end.

Group 5: Rome’s Growing Empire

Roman conquest promoted….

Identify the resources Romans wanted.

Identify the areas Romans took over by the early 100s.

Explain Pax Romana.

With a map either made or that can be projected on the projection screen- Identify and explain the borders of Roman Republic 100 B.C., Rome at Caesar’s death 44 B.C., Empire at Augustus’ death A.D. 14, Greatest extent of Empire A.D. 117.

Exit Card- List the contributions you made to your group. How did the day go? Any complaints?

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

2

3

Formative

Exit Card

 

2

4

Formative

Completion of group assignment

Group assignment

Lesson 3

Objectives: Students will successfully teach their lesson to their peers.

Students will identify Roman lasting accomplishments visible in their community.

Students will describe the Roman lasting accomplishments visible in their community.

Connection to Standards:

SS-7-CS-U-2

Students will understand that cultures develop social institutions (e.g., government, economy, education, religion, family) to structure society, influence behavior and respond to human needs.

SS-7-HP-U-4

Students will understand that advances in science and technology had a significant impact on historical events in world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-7-CS-S-5

Students will compare examples of cultural elements (e.g., beliefs, customs/traditions, language, skills, the arts, literature) using information from a variety of print and non-print sources (e.g., media, literature, interviews, observations, documentaries, artifacts) to analyze how cultures in world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. have influenced cultures of today

SS-07-5.3.2

Students will describe the rise of classical civilizations and empires (Greece and Rome) and explain how these civilizations had lasting impacts on the world in government, philosophy, architecture, art, drama and literature.

Procedures

Group share (25 min)

Walk of Roman Accomplishments- Remainder of class.

Class will take a walk outside of the school and walk on the sidewalk around the school property. Talk and have a group conversation of Roman lasting accomplishments that can be seen in "our" life.

Engineering- Durable roads, bridges, aqueducts, building designs that inspired later societies.

Architecture- Large and strong buildings, columns, and open spaces.

Government- Importance of written laws, equality, rights and duties of citizens.

Homework- Students will write a short description of how the buildings of their community have been influenced by Roman architecture.

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

3

5

Formative

Student lessons taught

 

3

6

Formative

Homework

 

3

7

Formative

Homework

 

Lesson 4

Objectives: Students will create an illustrated timeline of the Roman Empire and religion.

Students will identify four word wall vocabulary words in section 2.

Connection to Standards:

SS-7-CS-U-3

Students will understand that interactions among individuals and groups assume various forms (e.g., compromise, cooperation, conflict, competition) and are influenced by culture.

SS-7-HP-U-2

Students will understand that world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. can be examined in order to develop chronological understanding, recognize cause-effect relationships, and interpret historical events

Procedures

Bell Ringer- Share homework- discussion (10 minutes)

Students will be given a file folder (w/holes) to create an illustrated timeline of Roman Empire and Religion (that will go in binder). (35 min)

Students will also be assigned to choose 4 Word Wall words of this section of the chapter.

Discussion of timeline and choosing of Word Wall words. Words will be placed on the Enrichment Activity table for students to illustrate. (10 min)

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

4

8

Formative

Timeline Created

More time, extra help

4

9

Formative

Word Wall

Peer Help

Lesson 5

Objectives: Students will complete an outline of their speech of selected god or goddesses.

Students will begin their lead paragraph which contains one technique of grabbing the reader’s attention.

Connection to Standards:

EL-7-WC-U-2

Students will understand that different forms of writing are appropriate for different purposes and audiences across the content areas and have different features

WR-07-1.2.3

In Transactive Writing,

Students will incorporate persuasive techniques when appropriate (e.g., expert opinion emotional/logical/ethical appeal, repetition, rhetorical question) or propaganda techniques (e.g., testimonial, bandwagon) when appropriate.

WR-M-4.8.0

Prewriting,

Generating ideas (e.g., reading, journaling, mapping, webbing, note-taking, interviewing, researching, other writing-to-learn activities)

EL-7-WP-S-2

Students will prewrite-

Generate ideas to support and develop controlling idea.

Procedures

Students will be reminded that Roman’s often adopted gods or goddesses from the people with who they came in contact.

Each student will select a god or goddess that was worshipped in Rome but originated in a different civilization. Examples will be given- Isis, Cybele, Mithras, Osiris, and many of the Greek gods and goddesses.

Students can use the library, internet (laptops), or other resources in the room.

Each student will imagine that he or she is a speech writer for a provincial official. Each student should write a speech for the official expressing why that god or goddess should be included in a Roman pantheon. Students will be expected to have a speech outline completed and the start of the leading paragraph that grabs the reader’s attention. Students will work on the speech in L.A. class and for homework, prepared to share in 2 days.

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

5

10

Formative

Outline Completed

 

5

11

Formative

Lead Paragraph

 

Lesson 6

Objectives: Students will identify the main idea of their assigned topic in one sentence.

Students will complete their guided questions in preparing for their Socratic Circle.

Students will contribute at least once but not more than four times in their Socratic Circle.

Connection to Standards:

SS-7-CS-U-2

Students will understand that cultures develop social institutions (e.g., government, economy, education, religion, family) to structure society, influence behavior and respond to human needs.

SS-7-CS-U-3

Students will understand that interactions among individuals and groups assume various forms (e.g., compromise, cooperation, conflict, competition) and are influenced by culture.

Procedures

Each student will be assigned a topic of either: Religious Tolerance and Conflict, A New Religion, Jesus of Nazareth, The Growth of Christianity.

With use of their textbooks they are to write a 1 sentence main idea of their topic. (10 min)

Students will then group by topic and answer a set of questions together, but each student is responsible for having the answers to each question written down.

Religious Tolerance and Conflict

Describe the type of religion Roman’s practiced.

Identify the peoples from which Romans adopted some gods.

Describe how Roman’s dealt with other religions.

Identify when Rome conquered Judea.

A New Religion

Identify the religion the teachings of Christianity were based.

Explain why many Jews believed the Messiah would soon appear.

Jesus of Nazareth

Identify where the story of Jesus is recorded.

Describe why Jesus was arrested and executed.

Why do the Christians consider the Resurrection important?

Describe how Jesus spread his message.

The Growth of Christianity

Identify and describe: Who were the Apostles?

Describe why it was important for the Christian Church to break away from Judaism.

Predict why persecution might have made Christianity stronger.

Describe the effect Constantine had on the growth of Christianity

Each group will then participate in a Socratic Circle. Students are to focus on the guiding questions above and discuss the answers and their thoughts and feelings evoked from the sections. Every student will be given a worksheet with the above questions listed. Members of the audience will be able to take notes and fill in the answers to the questions. As each Socratic Circle takes place I will tally the responses and students will be given points based upon their participation. Students will be guided to make at least one contribution to their Socratic Circle but not more than 4 separate statements.

After each group participates in a Socratic Circle we will have a group discussion of the questions

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

6

12

Formative

One Sentence Main Idea

More time, peer help

6

13

Formative

Answers to guided questions

 

6

14

Formative

Socractic Circle

Assistance, cues

Lesson 7

Objectives: Students will identify why the Western Roman Empire is said to have fell.

Students will describe two reasons why the Western Roman Empire is said to have fell.

Connection to Standards:

SS-7-HP-U-2

Students will understand that world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. can be examined in order to develop chronological understanding, recognize cause-effect relationships, and interpret historical events

Procedures

Collect speeches and volunteers will share. (7 min)

Watch Video: Discovery, Civilizations: Fall of Power.

Students will be instructed to take notes using Double-Entry Note Taking. Students will draw a T-table on their paper. The left side of the T-table will be labeled Main Idea. The other side of the table will be labeled Details. At the bottom of their paper students will draw a box that is labeled "Summary." While watching the video students will fill in the detail box first and then at the end decide what the main ideas of the video were and then summarize.

After Video- Discussion/lecture. We will discuss their notes and I will call on volunteers to identify the main ideas they listed. We will then summarize the video as a group. Rome had one of the most stable empires in history. Stretching from Britain to the Sahara Desert (show map). For centuries the empire was united and prosperous. 285 the empire was split in two, East and West. 312, Constantine became the emperor- he moved the capital from Rome to the city of Byzantium and renamed the new capital Constantinople. 410, the Visigoths sacked Rome, and in 476 the last Roman emperor was overthrown. The Eastern part of the empire became known as the Byzantine Empire and remained powerful for several hundred years. Discuss the reasons why the Western Empire is said to have fell.

Exit Card- Indentify and describe why- two reasons given in the video or discussion as to why the Western Roman Empire fell.

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

7

15

Formative

Exit Card

 

7

16

Formative

Exit Card

 

Lesson 8

Objectives: Students will identify and answer 1 question in their assigned section.

Students will create and perform 1 skit based on their question and information of section.

Connection to Standards:

SS-7-CS-U-2

Students will understand that cultures develop social institutions (e.g., government, economy, education, religion, family) to structure society, influence behavior and respond to human needs.

SS-7-HP-U-2

Students will understand that world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. can be examined in order to develop chronological understanding, recognize cause-effect relationships, and interpret historical events

Procedures

The class will be divided into 3 sections.

1. From Republic to Empire

2. The Roman Empire and Religion

3. The End of the Empire

Sections will be subdivided

1. Disorder in the Republic

The End of the Republic

Rome’s Growing Empire

Rome’s Accomplishments

2. Religious Tolerance and Conflict

A New Religion

Jesus of Nazareth

The Growth of Christianity

3. Problems in the Empire

The Decline of Rome

A New Eastern Empire

Students will be directed to use their textbooks, class binders with work completed for the unit, and any other resources in the room to create a skit that is informative of the section they have been assigned.

Given examples- create a song, rap, poem, or play.

They must first each identify a question and answer and it must be incorporated into their skit in some way. Examples of questions and answers will be given… such as "Identify the definition of corruption," their rap will include "Corruption.. the decay of people’s values."

As each section performs their group will write their questions on the Smart Board and after their performance the audience will answer their questions.

As each group performs I will fill in any gaps needed.

Tomorrow students will be given a study guide with student questions and answers included which I will choose some from each class to be on the test in two days.

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

8

17

Formative

Group Skit

More Time

8

18

Formative

Group Skit

Extra Help

Lesson 10 Unit Test

Objectives: Students will complete unit exam.

Connection to Standards

SS-7-HP-U-2

Students will understand that world civilizations prior to 1500 A.D. can be examined in order to develop chronological understanding, recognize cause-effect relationships, and interpret historical events

Procedures:

Students will each be able to ask one question in regards to the test as time allows. (15 min)

Students will complete the exam.

Exam questions will be partially their questions that they made yesterday.

 

1. Describe the type of religion that the Romans practiced.

2. Identify three different groups of people from who the Romans adopted their gods.

3. Indentify the most common vehicle that would have been found on a Roman road.

4. Identify two economic resources that the Romans wanted.

5. Describe three events that led to Caesar’s death.

6. Identify the date of Caesar’s death and also what it is referred to as.

7. Predict how Cicero might have been more successful in the improvement of Roman government. Make one prediction and give an explanation of why it might be successful.

8. Identify the position in government that Caesar first held.

9. Define conquest.

10. Compare the elements of Roman architecture and modern-day American architecture

11. Describe two lasting achievements that Romans made in art.

12. Describe why it is that Christians consider the Resurrection important.

13. Where is the story of Jesus recorded?

Lesson #

Objective #

Type of Assessment

Brief Description of Assessment

Differentiation

10

20

Summative

Unit Test