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Dracula Extra Credit Project

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Dracula Extra Credit Project (10 points possible)

Last Day Work will be accepted: ___________________________________________________

  • You have many different projects that are competing for your attention.  You will have to manage your time, so this project has a rolling due date.  That is, you may hand in your project at ANY TIME from now until the last day that work will be accepted.  When you are finished and ready to hand in your project, email socialstudiesdavis@gmail.com to arrange a pickup/presentation time.
  • As this is an Extra Credit Project, you do not have to complete the assignment.  In addition, it is possible to earn up to 10 points but that does not mean that you will receive all of the points.  You cannot earn over 10 points, so do not try to do all of the projects.

 

Choose ONE project below to turn in.  Multiple projects will not be accepted.

Plan to Do

Project

 

  • You Be the Person!  Prepare a “You Be the Person” presentation in which you speak to your teachers for 3-5 minutes as the Dracula character of your choice.  It can be any character you choose.  Be prepared to share and defend your beliefs & actions, and be able to answer questions. 

 

  • Rewrite a scene from Dracula using the point of view of one of the ‘Evil’ characters (Dracula, Renfield, Undead Lucy, Brides of Dracula).  How were events from their perspective?  Include the original scene’s page numbers and use both inner thinking & dialogue.  You may incorporate Stoker’s original dialogue and create original dialogue for the scene. 

 

  • Scrapbook for Dracula.  The ‘Good’ characters are all represented throughout Dracula, but Dracula himself rarely has a voice.  Create a scrapbook from Dracula’s point of view, and there must be at least 6 separate entries.  Each entry must have at least one text feature beyond his text.

 

  • Dracula in NYC!  Pretend that Dracula wasn’t completely destroyed at the end of Dracula and he has decided to move to NYC.  Predict which part of the city he would target first.  Identify his main lair (his NYC Carfax), and at least 2 other areas of the city in which he would buy an apartment.  Locate 3 areas that Dracula would avoid.  After pinpointing the locations you feel Dracula would target/buy an apartment/avoid, include a detailed explanation (1 paragraph for each) of why he would be attracted or repulsed to the area.   Include a map with your locations and avoided places marked on them.  How would modern-day Van Helsings fight and defeat Dracula?

 

  • Free Choice.  Prepare a proposal form and submit your idea for approval.  This is your chance to create the project that you think would be best.

 

Assignment Details

Rewritten Scene from Dracula

  • Characters must be believable with what we already know about them from Stoker.
  • Scene clearly portrays the events from the evil characters point of view and perspective.
  • Vivid descriptions (including the use of the five senses) enable readers to envision the characters and setting.
  • Use of appropriate dialogue and inner thinking to propel the scene and enable readers to connect with the characters and their motivations.
  • Correct dialogue format used.
  • Includes the page numbers for the original scene on your cover page or under your name.

Dracula NYC

  • Predict which part of the city (the borough) Dracula would target first. 
  • Identify his main lair (his NYC Carfax), and at least 2 other areas of the city in which he would buy an apartment. 
  • Locate 3 areas that Dracula would avoid. 
  • After pinpointing the locations you feel Dracula would target/buy an apartment/avoid, include a detailed explanation of why he would be attracted or repulsed to the area.
    • Therefore you will need 1 paragraph describing why Dracula would choose that section for his main lair.  What about that area makes it appropriate for him?
    • Need 1 paragraph explaining why Dracula would buy an apartment in the other two areas.
    • For the locations Dracula would avoid, write 1 paragraph explaining what or who in the area would make Dracula avoid it. 
    • Hint – spread the apartment areas and avoided areas out over the city area.  You’ll have more to talk about.
  • Write one paragraph about how modern-day Van Helsings would fight and defeat Dracula this time.
  • Include a map or some type of visual with BOTH your Lair, apartment locations and avoided places marked on it.

Scrapbook for Dracula

  • Cover of scrapbook must have a meaningful title and student’s name.
  • You can mix fictional experiences along with known experiences for Dracula, but all the experiences must be realistic.  Or as realistic as a vampire story would allow.
  • Include inner thinking and dialogue.  Dracula doesn’t have to have said it in the book. 
  • Dialogue format must be used.
  • Must have 6 separate entries.  Each entry must be at least 1 page in length (a page as defined as 8.5 by 11 inches).
  • Each page will have at least 1 meaningful picture with a caption.

You Be the Person

  • Take on the role of the character
  • Cover at least 5 important facts about the life of the character
  • Should be between 3 and 5 minutes in length
  • Script must be turned in before information is presented
  • Should be presented to an audience with the ability to answer questions while in character
  • Must have a prop or some form of costume

 

Name: ____________________________________________________________

 

Rubric for Dracula NYC/Scrapbook/Rewritten scene

 

Criteria

Excellent

Good

Poor

Total

Content:

 

Is the content of the product well chosen?

Content chosen represents the best choice for the product.  Graphics are well chosen and related to content.

Information or graphics are related to content, but are not the best choice for the product.

Information or graphics presented do not appear to be related to topic or task.

 

Completeness:

 

Is everything included in the product?

All information needed is included.  Product meets the product criteria and the criteria of the task as stated.

Some important information is missing.  Product meets the product criteria and the criteria of the task as stated.

Most important information is missing.  The product does not meet the task or does not meet the product criteria.

 

Correctness:

 

Is all of the information included correct?

All information presented in the product is correct and accurate.

Some of the information is incorrect.

Most of the information is incorrect.

 

Communication:

 

Is the information in the product well communicated?

All information is neat and easy to read.  Product is in an appropriate format and shows significant effort.

Most of the product is neat and easy to read.  Product is in appropriate format and shows significant effort.

The product is not neat and easy to read or the product is not in the appropriate format.  It does not show significant effort.

 

 

 

 

Total:

 

 

Comments:



 

You Be the Person Presentation Rubric

Criteria

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Total

Content – Completeness

The presentation included everything it should.

Presentation included all of the important information about the topic being presented.

Presentation covered most of the important information, but one key idea was missing.

Presentation covered some of the important information, more than one key idea was missing.

Presentation included some information, but it was trivial or irrelevant.

 

Content – Correctness

All of the information presented was accurate.

All of the information presented was accurate.

All of the information was correct with a few unintentional errors that were quickly corrected.

Most of the information presented was correct, but there were a few errors.

A majority of the information presented was not correct.

 

Content – Consistency

Speaker stayed on topic during the presentation.

Presented stayed on topic 100% of the time.

Presented stayed on topic 90 – 99% of the time.

Presenter stayed on topic 80 – 89% of the time.

It was hard to tell what the topic was.

 

Prop

Speaker had at least one prop that was directly related to the presentation.

Presenter had the prop and it complimented the presentation.

Presenter had a prop, but it was not the best choice.

Presenter had a prop, but there was no clear reason for its choice.

No Prop

 

Flow

Speaker knew the presentation well, so the words were well spoken and flowed well together.

Presentation flowed well.  Speaker did not stumble over words.

Some flow problems, but they did not distract from information.

Some flow problems interrupted presentation; presenter seemed flustered.

Constant flow problems; information was not presented in a way it could be understood.

 

 

 

 

 

Total:

 

 

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